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Old 02-06-2018, 11:06 AM
 
8,197 posts, read 11,913,206 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Flamingo13 View Post
Lots of info. (you also must be at least 62, not 60)
This is incorrect.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Winter Sucks View Post
I'm a mid 50's female in good health right now and there is some longevity in my family. My full retirement age is 67. I've always done office work earning about $20,000.00 a year. Late last summer I lost my job and only earned $16,000.00 and have been unable to find another job so far. I was married to my former husband for 15 years. He passed away 10 years ago (and never re-married) when we were divorced. I would be entitled to his Social Security when I turn 60. During the last five years he was employed, he got a much better job than he always held and was earning $50,000.00-$60,000.00 a year. I know that the longer you wait to start collecting the more you're supposed to get per month, but I wonder if I'd actually get more by taking HIS SS benefits at age 60 since he earned significantly more than me the last several years he worked. Anyone have knowledge in this area?
You can collect based on your deceased ex-husband's work history at age 60 and then switch to your own at age 67 (or at any age between 62-70) if it provides you with a higher benefit.
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Old 02-06-2018, 11:10 AM
 
Location: Alexandria, VA
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Have you read this? https://www.ssa.gov/planners/retire/divspouse.html
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Old 02-06-2018, 11:13 AM
 
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if you are less than full retirement age you lose a piece of his . how much depends on who took what and when .

if he filed early for his and you file early you get at age 60 his full retirement amount (not the age 70 benefit) , less 29% ..... at age 62 it is less 19%
that is what you would get . so if his is 2500 a month you would get at age 60 1775.00 , age 62 you would get 2015 , and your fra 2500.00

Last edited by mathjak107; 02-06-2018 at 11:42 AM..
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Old 02-06-2018, 11:23 AM
 
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A sidenote: if you work WHILE you are accepting survivor benefits, your benefit check can be reduced.

Last time I checked, the earnings limit was around $1400 a month while keeping 100% of your survivor benefits. This is if you are under
full retirement age (FRA).

If you are FRA or older, you no reduction applied. You keep all of your job earnings

One other trick to know for sure is to do the math yourself. This bull ****** statement of you get about as much Social Security in a lifetime whether you take it early or late is often inaccurate.
If I take my SS early, I get 30K more. Why??
1. My husband is 8 years older
2. Male lifespan is 5-7 years less than a female
3. He is on a CPAP Machine already at age 57. That is conducive to someone who will not live longer than the average lifespan
especially since he lived with severe breathing issues for decades. His heart cannot be that stron.

When I am 62, he is 70 yrs old. When I am 72, He is 80 years old which is a few years longer than the average lifespan. Despite his health issues. That;s the longest he'll probably live but if we give him 3 more years until age 83, I still end up with 30K more lifetime benefits off of my own earnings prior to taking over his Survivor benefit at age 75. If he dies at 83, later in life. He exercises and eats right

If I am wrong, and he lives until age 85 which would be a miracle with his health issues, then I break even. No $$ lost nor gained. I oly gain when he lives beyond age 85


This is the Social Security Phamplet which addresses Survivor Benefits. It's exactly what you need

https://www.ssa.gov/pubs/EN-05-10084.pdf

Last edited by DaddyLongLeg; 02-06-2018 at 11:40 AM..
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Old 02-06-2018, 11:37 AM
 
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survivor benefits are very complicated to figure out just by reading if you are not familiar how they work . there are different formulas based on who took what and when .

Deceased filed for Social Security retirement benefit:


Filed prior to full retirement age: maximum widow benefit equals the larger of the deceased reduced benefit or 82.5% of deceased primary insurance amount

Filed after full retirement age: maximum widow benefit equals the deceased benefit including delayed retirement credits

Deceased did not file for benefits

Died prior to full retirement age: maximum widow benefit equals the primary insurance amount of the deceased

Died after full retirement age: maximum widow benefit equals the deceased benefit as if deceased elected on date of death, including delayed retirement credits

There will most likely be complications when advising a widowed spouse on when to elect Social Security benefits.

Here are the three main complicating factors for widows:

Two different full retirement ages (FRA): retirement FRA and their widow FRA. For most people getting ready to elect Social Security, their retirement FRA is 66. Their widow FRA is determined by subtracting two years from their date of birth and using that as their birth year. There is no advantage to delaying widow(er) benefits past the widow’s FRA as there are no delayed retirement credits based on the widow’s claim age.

Two different full retirement ages (FRA): retirement FRA and their widow FRA. For most people getting ready to elect Social Security, their retirement FRA is 66. Their widow FRA is determined by subtracting two years from their date of birth and using that as their birth year. There is no advantage to delaying widow(er) benefits past the widow’s FRA as there are no delayed retirement credits based on the widow’s claim age.

Widow limit: the widow limit caps the widow(er) benefit at the larger of the benefit the deceased would have received if he or she were still alive, or 82.5% of the deceased primary insurance amount. The widow limit only comes into play if the deceased claimed benefits prior to his or her full retirement age.
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Old 02-06-2018, 11:45 AM
 
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In my case, the ex-husband passed away in his 40's so he wasn't collecting any SS.

It's confusing and I have to wonder by visiting the SS office if they're really going to give me the advice most advantageous to ME or advice that will save SS money.
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Old 02-06-2018, 11:55 AM
 
8,197 posts, read 11,913,206 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Flamingo13 View Post
Yes, I have. And unlike you, I comprehended that that particular provision does not apply to the OP.

The OP would be filing as a surviving divorced spouse, not as simply a divorced spouse. Consequently, she would be entitled to file at age 60, not 62, in accordance with these provisions:

https://www.ssa.gov/planners/survivors/ifyou3.html

https://www.ssa.gov/planners/survivors/ifyou2.html


Apology accepted.
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Old 02-06-2018, 12:06 PM
 
71,559 posts, read 71,730,589 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Winter Sucks View Post
In my case, the ex-husband passed away in his 40's so he wasn't collecting any SS.

It's confusing and I have to wonder by visiting the SS office if they're really going to give me the advice most advantageous to ME or advice that will save SS money.
you have to see what his work history looks like . most likely what his fra was reduced by 29% at age 60. there will always be a cut because you are not fra .
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Old 02-06-2018, 12:28 PM
 
Location: Verde Valley AZ
8,618 posts, read 9,682,513 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mathjak107 View Post
you have to see what his work history looks like . most likely what his fra was reduced by 29% at age 60. there will always be a cut because you are not fra .

Maybe you can answer a question for me since I can't seem to find any answer in all the reading I've done. Does my ex have to be at FRA for me to collect anything on HIS benefits? Reason I ask is because my ex was way younger than me and I think his FRA is probably 65-70. Well, he's only 59 and will be 60 this year. A VERY good reason to not marry someone so much younger!! He has always made way more than I did/do so is probably going to have a good sum available when the time comes. Any answers/suggestions??
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Old 02-06-2018, 12:52 PM
 
1,836 posts, read 787,154 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Winter Sucks View Post
In my case, the ex-husband passed away in his 40's so he wasn't collecting any SS.

It's confusing and I have to wonder by visiting the SS office if they're really going to give me the advice most advantageous to ME or advice that will save SS money.
You need to talk with the social security office. You need to find out what his social security will pay out if you take it at 60 vs. what you would get at 67 and determine your life expectancy then you determine which way you would get more.

For example

Say at 60 you get $1,000 a month based on your ex's work and your life expectancy is 85. This gives you 25 years of collecting, or $300,000 in total.

If you wait until 67 and you get $1200 a month you collect $259,200.

In this scenario it makes sense to take $1,000 at 60 because over your lifetime you would collect more.

In fact, even if you were to die earlier, say 79, you would still benefit by taking it early.

You first need the numbers which you can get from social security.
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