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Old 02-06-2018, 04:07 PM
 
167 posts, read 74,475 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mathjak107 View Post
they may be obligated but these clerks are scripted and i found i know more than they do . there are sites where you pay but they are social security pro's . depending on the work up and how integrated you want the analysis to be with all your assets they charge different amounts . i like social security solutions but there are loads of them .
Spot on
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Old 02-06-2018, 05:25 PM
 
Location: Out West
273 posts, read 180,831 times
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Your SS benefit is based on your highest 35 YEARS of earnings, adjusted for inflation. If you have fewer than 35 years of earnings, your benefit calculation will contain some 0s. When SS gives you an estimate of your benefit, whether online or by a printed copy mailed to you (those are going away, btw), the number is based on the assumption that you will continue to earn your most recent years' salary until you are 66/67, whichever your full retirement age.

Have a look at this SS page: Scroll down to the chart and click on the year you were born. It will tell you the percentage you will receive. https://www.ssa.gov/planners/survivo...rchartred.html


To know whether you would be better off taking a fraction of your ex-spouse's benefit instead of your own would require knowing what his benefit was, and when he elected to take it.

Agree with the others that speaking to a social security representative in your local office will be the most helpful.
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Old 02-06-2018, 06:16 PM
 
588 posts, read 302,149 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PartIrish View Post

To know whether you would be better off taking a fraction of your ex-spouse's benefit instead of your own would require knowing what his benefit was, and when he elected to take it.
He never collected anything. He was in his 40's when he passed away.
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Old 02-06-2018, 06:46 PM
 
Location: Saint John, IN
11,043 posts, read 3,994,985 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Flamingo13 View Post
Lots of info. (you also must be at least 62, not 60)


My mother was able to collect my deceased fathers when she turned 60, but that was almost 4 years ago so the laws may have changed since then. rs ago). From my understanding you can collect his now and collect yours later. You can take whatever is better. My mother still works so she does not get checks every month as they adjust for her income. When she retires she can decided to continue to take his benefit or take hers, whichever is better.
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Old 02-06-2018, 06:51 PM
 
Location: Idaho
4,628 posts, read 4,470,900 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Winter Sucks View Post
In my case, the ex-husband passed away in his 40's so he wasn't collecting any SS.

It's confusing and I have to wonder by visiting the SS office if they're really going to give me the advice most advantageous to ME or advice that will save SS money.
If you speak to a knowledgeable representative, and most of them are, they will do what is best for you, not the Social Security Administration. You need not worry about that, but as suggested, it wouldn't hurt to visit several offices over time. (But, I think they do keep notes on your interactions with them as part of your file. When you visit a rep, they will look up your account and read the notes of previous visits. If this is wrong, please, somebody, let me/us know.)
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Old 02-06-2018, 06:55 PM
 
671 posts, read 178,592 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Winter Sucks View Post
I'm a mid 50's female in good health right now and there is some longevity in my family. My full retirement age is 67. I've always done office work earning about $20,000.00 a year. Late last summer I lost my job and only earned $16,000.00 and have been unable to find another job so far. I was married to my former husband for 15 years. He passed away 10 years ago (and never re-married) when we were divorced. I would be entitled to his Social Security when I turn 60. During the last five years he was employed, he got a much better job than he always held and was earning $50,000.00-$60,000.00 a year. I know that the longer you wait to start collecting the more you're supposed to get per month, but I wonder if I'd actually get more by taking HIS SS benefits at age 60 since he earned significantly more than me the last several years he worked. Anyone have knowledge in this area?
Sorry, just re-read your post and realized that I might misunderstood your question in my earlier reply to you.
I think you are hoping to start collecting SS based on your ex- husband record at 60, while hoping to let your SS benefit to grow? Or the other way around?
If it is so, I am afraid that you may not be aware of 2015 changes which closed that loophole

https://www.ssa.gov/planners/retire/claiming.html

Once you applied for SS benefit, no matter the age- SSA consider that you retired and will compare ALL available benefits to you- in your case based on your ex husband record and your own and will pick the higher of the 2. You will not be able to let your benefit to grow.
As your ex- husband is gone- your SS benefit based on his record is not going to grow either- so you can learn what is the exact amount of your benefit based on his record will be available for you
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Old 02-06-2018, 08:06 PM
 
8,204 posts, read 11,918,472 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nik4me View Post
Sorry, just re-read your post and realized that I might misunderstood your question in my earlier reply to you.
I think you are hoping to start collecting SS based on your ex- husband record at 60, while hoping to let your SS benefit to grow? Or the other way around?
If it is so, I am afraid that you may not be aware of 2015 changes which closed that loophole

https://www.ssa.gov/planners/retire/claiming.html

Once you applied for SS benefit, no matter the age- SSA consider that you retired and will compare ALL available benefits to you- in your case based on your ex husband record and your own and will pick the higher of the 2. You will not be able to let your benefit to grow.
As your ex- husband is gone- your SS benefit based on his record is not going to grow either- so you can learn what is the exact amount of your benefit based on his record will be available for you
No, I'm afraid you didn't understand fully the link that you provided to the OP. The loopholes that were closed do not - - - I repeat, do not - - - apply to survivors' benefits. The information I provided earlier in this thread is correct. If you doubt me, just click on your own link and read the paragraph titled Who Will Be Affected. In fact, I'll just C&P it for you below:

Who will be affected? If you turn 62 on or after January 2, 2016, and will be eligible for benefits both as a retired worker and as a spouse (or divorced spouse), then the new law applies to you. Deemed filing applies to retirement benefits, not to survivorís benefits. So, if you are a widow or widower, you may start your survivor benefit independently of your retirement benefit if you restrict the scope of your application. There are also some exceptions to deemed filing. For example, deemed filing does not apply if you receive spouse's benefits and are also entitled to disability, or if you are receiving spousal benefits because you are caring for the retired workerís child. If you have questions about your specific situation, contact Social Security.

To reiterate what I wrote earlier, the OP can collect based on her deceased ex-husband's work history at age 60 and then switch to her own at age 67 (or at any age between 62-70) if it provides her with a higher benefit.
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Old 02-07-2018, 06:29 AM
 
4,004 posts, read 3,223,268 times
Reputation: 13029
I cringe when reading these Social Security threads. So much bad information is given.
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Old 02-07-2018, 06:41 AM
 
71,650 posts, read 71,777,271 times
Reputation: 49240
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nik4me View Post
Sorry, just re-read your post and realized that I might misunderstood your question in my earlier reply to you.
I think you are hoping to start collecting SS based on your ex- husband record at 60, while hoping to let your SS benefit to grow? Or the other way around?
If it is so, I am afraid that you may not be aware of 2015 changes which closed that loophole

https://www.ssa.gov/planners/retire/claiming.html

Once you applied for SS benefit, no matter the age- SSA consider that you retired and will compare ALL available benefits to you- in your case based on your ex husband record and your own and will pick the higher of the 2. You will not be able to let your benefit to grow.
As your ex- husband is gone- your SS benefit based on his record is not going to grow either- so you can learn what is the exact amount of your benefit based on his record will be available for you
madman is correct . retirement ss works differently than survivor benefits and has it's own rules and formulas . the changes were to retirement ss
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Old 02-07-2018, 08:16 AM
 
6,483 posts, read 3,076,749 times
Reputation: 5942
In the last few years, I've been to 3 different offices with other people needing info.

One office was in a large city, one in a suburb/exurb of a large city and one in a small town.

The best service was in the small town office and I don't think that was coincidental. They had by far the highest ratio of older and presumably more knowledgeable/experienced staff. They were less busy and more on track with their appointment times. They also were more thorough with explanations and more patient with questions.

In all three offices, I noticed that the older staff were the ones taking people with appointments.

They will give you printouts with amounts for the options you have and its pretty easy to see which option is best. Just make sure you understand what's not included like COL estimates and changes to future earnings.
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