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Old 02-13-2018, 07:55 PM
 
Location: So Ca
15,858 posts, read 15,088,758 times
Reputation: 13786

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Quote:
Originally Posted by JJAF View Post
TI really don't know if this is a benefit, but I am somewhat physically imposing. 20 years military and most say I do not look like I am 54. I have always come into a authoritative situation firm, and can let loose the reigns a little as the situation warrants, versus coming in trying to be everyone's buddy and then try to tighten it up.
Yes, it will be a benefit. Any school district will be thrilled to have someone like you!
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Old 02-14-2018, 05:31 AM
 
224 posts, read 239,191 times
Reputation: 237
Default Realize I am unqualified

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sand&Salt View Post
Loosen the "reins"....
I am definitely disqualified from teaching now.
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Old 02-14-2018, 10:12 AM
 
1,219 posts, read 1,359,720 times
Reputation: 1921
Quote:
Originally Posted by JJAF View Post
I searched the forum board to see if a thread had already been discussed. But I was wondering if anyone has done substitute teaching in their retirement years and if they liked it or thought it wasn't worth the trouble. I don't have to have the extra income....would be nice "pocket change", but am bored of just going to the gym and not a whole lot else productivity during the week. Thank you in advance of your responses.
As evidenced in the posts here, each person has his/her own experience or idea about subbing. You won't know how it works for you until you actually have your own subbing experience. I sub often and love it. It gets me out of the house, I also love that it is nice "pocket change" and I sub on my own schedule. I do like subbing in the same school as much as I want because I get to develop a relationship with the students. If my presence makes the difference in one child's life, it is all worth my time.

Consider subbing in different schools and different grade levels to determine what works for you. Let us know how it goes.
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Old 02-14-2018, 09:02 PM
 
405 posts, read 162,451 times
Reputation: 1148
Quote:
Originally Posted by yellowsnow View Post
All of the above is true. I think a good bit of the problems are caused by students who for one reason or another can't keep up. So they act out. They then get all the attention and those who come to school to learn are not being served because of all the discipline problems.

This is why I volunteer teaching ESL. The students want to learn!
Why Volunteer? I teach ESL part-time and I am paid by my school district to teach ESL and Citizenship.
I started out as a substitute, then a long term sub, then a regular teacher. I only work 4 mornings a week, and get Fridays and weekends off. Two of those days I teach citizenship for an extra 2 1/2 hours in the afternoons. The adult students are fantastic and want to learn.
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Old 02-18-2018, 05:49 AM
 
Location: Upstate NY
34 posts, read 22,815 times
Reputation: 119
I retired after teaching 30 years. For the next two and a half years I was a substitute teacher. The key to enjoying it was finding the right school. I began by subbing in three districts. Two of the districts had bad management and poor teacher morale. The third district was very small and ran well. I knocked the other two districts out and stayed with the one. I very much enjoyed it. Once you get known you are often asked to work long-term absences. I once worked 6 weeks for a teacher that was out with knee surgery. I loved not having to stay for faculty meetings, write report cards, or meet with parents. It was perfect. The one downside it that the school did come depend on me more than I wanted. I worked almost every day when 3 days per week was my goal. Of course I could always say no, but I never want to let people down, ha! After two and a half years of subbing two things happened, my first grandchild was born and we moved out of the area. So I stopped subbing. I think if you can find the 'right' school district and you still enjoy being around children, it would be a nice retirement career. As a former teacher, at least where I worked, you got paid at a higher rate than other subs.
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Old 02-18-2018, 06:25 AM
 
284 posts, read 260,864 times
Reputation: 715
My DH always wanted to teach, but back in the 70ís in MS pay was so low and health insurance so bad, he had to choose another career. Upon retirement, he started substitute teaching. Of course he didnít make a lot of money doing it, but he loved it and could work most any day he chose to. The middle school in our town kept him very busy. He was picky about where he worked, since some shools were much better disciplined than others. He wasnít going to work where he had to put up with a bunch of unruly kids in his class and knew the schools to avoid. Plus being a 6í2Ē man with a commanding voice helped keep his classrooms under control and kept him in demand. It was a good retirement gig for him, but again he always wanted to teach. He truly enjoyed being around the kids and being in a school environment, and the extra $$ didnít hurt.
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Old 02-18-2018, 06:49 AM
 
Location: Kennett Square, PA
1,699 posts, read 2,615,240 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by runswithscissors View Post
You could probably be a teacher's assistant/aide if you don't want to make a huge commitment right now.

As a parent, I'd be just as demanding of a sub as a full timer. Maybe more so.


Or how about tutoring?

My FL county has a huge program of volunteers who tutor, also. Especially reading.

There are also kids who get personal assistants from Counties when they have an IEP. Sometimes constant one on one. AT the schools, even.
Really? Well, perhaps you had better appeal to your school board for equity in the remuneration department. I've worked in education for 35 years (5 as a full-time teacher), 17 as a part-time teacher (while juggling other venues) and 13 as a college administrator. I am fully certified with a wealth of experience along the socioeconomic corridor. Yet I have NEVER experienced a more intractable system than that of substitute teaching. And they wonder why there is such an enormous shortage

In an area of SE PA where teachers average a very hefty pay https://patch.com/pennsylvania/sprin...eld-sd-compare ALONG with an enormous benefits package, the substitute teacher receives an average of $12.50 per hour, pre-tax, and is often given the job of ONE AND ONE-HALF teachers per day (with a "generous" 25 minute lunch).

Yes, we have the already-retired personnel who are able to glide through on their munificent packages, and the young bloods who believe that they will land a full-time position (few do). I am there because I LOVE the kids (particularly middle school children, as they still retain "the goofy factor"). And they love ME I am not sitting in a desk at the front of the room playing on a smartphone (as many full-time teachers have complained). I am on my feet through 6, 7, and sometimes 8 classes; I am engaged and continually create additional activities if and when the "plans" fall short of the period. The districts for which I work are very happy with me. But alas...these positions are unsustainable financially, and this will be my last year of "subbing." I have written several times to the PDOE - typical no response.

So perhaps, "as a parent," you might be willing to write YOUR DOE or show up at your local school board meeting and get it through their thick skulls that professionalism comes with a price: (of a 40% increase, which would still place us well behind a "beginning" teacher). Thank you for listening.
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Old 02-18-2018, 08:40 AM
 
6,371 posts, read 5,101,471 times
Reputation: 12946
Quote:
Originally Posted by soulsurv View Post
Really? Well, perhaps you had better appeal to your school board for equity in the remuneration department. I've worked in education for 35 years (5 as a full-time teacher), 17 as a part-time teacher (while juggling other venues) and 13 as a college administrator. I am fully certified with a wealth of experience along the socioeconomic corridor. Yet I have NEVER experienced a more intractable system than that of substitute teaching. And they wonder why there is such an enormous shortage

In an area of SE PA where teachers average a very hefty pay https://patch.com/pennsylvania/sprin...eld-sd-compare ALONG with an enormous benefits package, the substitute teacher receives an average of $12.50 per hour, pre-tax, and is often given the job of ONE AND ONE-HALF teachers per day (with a "generous" 25 minute lunch).

Yes, we have the already-retired personnel who are able to glide through on their munificent packages, and the young bloods who believe that they will land a full-time position (few do). I am there because I LOVE the kids (particularly middle school children, as they still retain "the goofy factor"). And they love ME I am not sitting in a desk at the front of the room playing on a smartphone (as many full-time teachers have complained). I am on my feet through 6, 7, and sometimes 8 classes; I am engaged and continually create additional activities if and when the "plans" fall short of the period. The districts for which I work are very happy with me. But alas...these positions are unsustainable financially, and this will be my last year of "subbing." I have written several times to the PDOE - typical no response.

So perhaps, "as a parent," you might be willing to write YOUR DOE or show up at your local school board meeting and get it through their thick skulls that professionalism comes with a price: (of a 40% increase, which would still place us well behind a "beginning" teacher). Thank you for listening.
heck - here in our small town the pay for a sub with less than 60 college hours is 60 dollars a day. That is 7.50 an hour! There was a job advertising for help to sort lettuce and they paid 10 dollars an hour!

Our school also suffers from a shortage of subs.
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Old 02-18-2018, 10:57 AM
 
Location: Kennett Square, PA
1,699 posts, read 2,615,240 times
Reputation: 2594
Quote:
Originally Posted by Clemencia53 View Post
heck - here in our small town the pay for a sub with less than 60 college hours is 60 dollars a day. That is 7.50 an hour! There was a job advertising for help to sort lettuce and they paid 10 dollars an hour!

Our school also suffers from a shortage of subs.
Clemencia53, I pay my DOG SITTERS $20.00 for 20 MINUTES! And they're worth every penny! I don't see the Substitute teaching situation changing anytime soon. It's basically for people who don't need the money - YET who must be certified, according to the state. Simply doesn't match up. The DOE should change the laws and allow the aids to sub; they are an incredibly dedicated group of people, Lord bless them.
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Old 02-19-2018, 06:15 AM
 
Location: Kennett Square, PA
1,699 posts, read 2,615,240 times
Reputation: 2594
Quote:
Originally Posted by JJAF View Post
I am definitely disqualified from teaching now.
JJAF, in my area (SE PA) "Alternative" Schools are screaming for someone your "size" as guards (sometimes disguised as "aids"). And they usually pay a bit more.

BUT PLEASE NOTE: Alternative schools, designed for "youth-at-risk" (formerly known as juvenile delinquents) have undergone a huge change. I worked in 2 of them for 4 years (2000-2004), but NOW - Many states have relabeled Youth-at-risk under the DISABLED umbrella. Yeah...so now these kids have no consequences. Whereby formerly a teacher under threat or who witnessed violent property destruction could call in law enforcement, now the offender is simply coddled with an arm around his/her shoulder and told he is "better than that" until he calms down (and of course, repeats the behavior two hours later). Huge mistake, thanks to our departments of education

As a substitute, I was offered a full-time job/full benefits package in one of them just recently. But I told them that their state-mandated policies were irresponsible and unsustainable.

You might want to look into a part-time job (morning or afternoon shift) as either a guard or an aid, both of whom work closely with the kids.
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