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Old 02-15-2018, 04:26 PM
 
5,432 posts, read 3,464,353 times
Reputation: 13714

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Quote:
Originally Posted by bgrasser View Post

For older folks with acreage, it may be a young mans game if you canít afford to hire out some of the required tasks. With many acres, comes much work.
What happens if one does no work on the acres? What happens to the acres?
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Old 02-15-2018, 04:47 PM
 
Location: The Outer Limits
1,467 posts, read 1,824,679 times
Reputation: 2416
Quote:
Originally Posted by matisse12 View Post
What happens if one does no work on the acres? What happens to the acres?
In time my cleared fields, orchards, and gardens will return to their natural state.
My driveway is 1/2 mile long, we keep grasses on both sides clipped back about 6í using weed eaters.
If I donít maintain, I will lose my investment.
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Old 02-15-2018, 05:35 PM
 
7,974 posts, read 5,065,845 times
Reputation: 13635
Quote:
Originally Posted by bgrasser View Post
In time my cleared fields, orchards, and gardens will return to their natural state.
My driveway is 1/2 mile long, we keep grasses on both sides clipped back about 6í using weed eaters.
If I donít maintain, I will lose my investment.
My place isn't quite as substantial, but I've blithely ignored "yard" work on my acreage. Why bother? Property values will likely never return to the level at which I bought the place. Instead, I just view it as a depreciating asset.
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Old 02-15-2018, 05:41 PM
 
10,604 posts, read 14,232,720 times
Reputation: 17208
Quote:
Originally Posted by ss20ts View Post
Your post doesn't say their ages. I also know many retirees who live in rural areas who are very active. Life is what you make it. Some folks live in rural areas until they die. Others move to a city to be near medical care or family or grocery stores or whatever.
They're his age.

Early 30's. So they're not anywhere near retirement age.

I was wondering what the point was, too. I think it just triggered the discussion point.
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Old 02-15-2018, 06:04 PM
 
5,432 posts, read 3,464,353 times
Reputation: 13714
Quote:
Originally Posted by matisse12 View Post

What happens if one does no work on the acres? What happens to the acres?
Quote:
Originally Posted by bgrasser View Post

In time my cleared fields, orchards, and gardens will return to their natural state.
My driveway is 1/2 mile long, we keep grasses on both sides clipped back about 6’ using weed eaters.
If I don’t maintain, I will lose my investment.
Quote:
Originally Posted by ohio_peasant View Post
My place isn't quite as substantial, but I've blithely ignored "yard" work on my acreage. Why bother? Property values will likely never return to the level at which I bought the place. Instead, I just view it as a depreciating asset.
I do not know anything about owning acres and tending to the acres, that is why I asked.

Last edited by matisse12; 02-15-2018 at 06:27 PM..
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Old 02-15-2018, 06:48 PM
 
10,604 posts, read 14,232,720 times
Reputation: 17208
Quote:
Originally Posted by GeoffD View Post
Looks like a backwater place to me

Here's a real hospital:
https://health.usnews.com/best-hospi...spital-6140430
Nope.

The snark doesn't work when the facts are so obvious.

A teaching hospital, ranked #4 in the state of Michigan. it's a rural hospital. #s 1-3 were large urban.

Level II Trauma Center, established 1915.

This hospital achieved the highest rating possible in 9 procedures or conditions.

Rated High Performing in
5 Adult Specialties
9 Adult Procedures/Conditions

Cardiology & Heart Surgery
Diabetes & Endocrinology
Gastroenterology & GI Surgery
Geriatrics
Pulmonology

Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair
Aortic Valve Surgery
Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD)
Colon Cancer Surgery
Heart Bypass Surgery
Heart Failure
Hip Replacement
Knee Replacement
Lung Cancer Surgery


https://health.usnews.com/best-hospi...center-6440013

So 330 million people in America should rush to become urban dwellers and move to Boston-ish?

I thought you lived in Rhode Island?

None of their hospitals are nationally ranked and not a single one has 5 or 9 high performing achievement ratings like Munson. Luckily you can drive an hour or two when you have an aneurysm to get to Boston.

Even the #1 Ranking Mayo Clinic in FL has only:

3 Adult Specialties
9 Adult Procedures/Conditions

"Are the highest-ranking hospitals always the best choices?

Not necessarily. Hospitals are evaluated across a wide range of conditions and procedures. Within that range, hospitals can and do perform differently. In pulmonology, for example, a hospital might rank below another one but do better at treating patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.
"

"Doesn't reputation still determine which hospitals are ranked?

No. Many ranked hospitals have very low, even zero, reputational scores but are strong clinical performers. In the 2017-18 orthopedics rankings, to take this specialty as one of many examples, 24 ranked hospitals had reputational scores below 2 percent and four had reputational scores of zero."

Last edited by runswithscissors; 02-15-2018 at 07:01 PM..
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Old 02-15-2018, 08:13 PM
 
3,803 posts, read 2,024,894 times
Reputation: 3271
Quote:
Originally Posted by oldgardener View Post
You can always move back into town when your health fails...you don't have to be near hospitals and Walmart for every minute of your retirement. If you retire in your 60s, why not live where you want and enjoy it for 20 years, then move back to Walmart and hospitals when you become frail.

Life is short. Enjoy it while you can.
This. It ain't rocket science folks.
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Old 02-15-2018, 08:42 PM
 
6,351 posts, read 5,085,406 times
Reputation: 12910
Quote:
Originally Posted by matisse12 View Post
What happens if one does no work on the acres? What happens to the acres?
Also depends on what kind of acreage.

We have an undeveloped acre behind the house. We keep maybe 20feet of it mowed. The rest is mesquite trees, some cactus and small brush. Nothing dense.

This might be weird, but I've never even walked all the way to the end of it. For some reason has never interested me. An acre isn't really that big either.
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Old 02-15-2018, 09:21 PM
 
Location: A Yankee in northeast TN
10,541 posts, read 14,362,196 times
Reputation: 23432
Quote:
Originally Posted by Serious Conversation View Post
There is an ETSU professor, Chris Dula, that has a public blog on his battle with brain cancer. He's receiving treatment at Duke. He's not able to drive now, and this has to be tough with his wife also missing work for his appointments there.

You might not have that many appointments, but having to go that far out has to get old and be difficult.
And if he lived in Knoxville or Chattanooga or any other dozens (hundreds?) of smaller cities, he'd still be driving to Duke, or whatever larger metropolitan area, for such specialized care. It's not like those facilities and that level of care are available everywhere BUT rural areas. If this is a long term, permanent need for specialized care there is always the option to move nearer the necessary healthcare at that point.
Which brings me to this:
Quote:
Originally Posted by matisse12 View Post
I think one of the main points is to avoid being distant from an Emergency Room of a hospital, not just focusing on being close to one's personal primary care doctor or one's specialist.

And yes, "being whisked to the nearest hospital at the drop of a hat" does certainly happen, is certainly necessary especially for heart attacks or strokes, and an important critical factor.

And one does not know ahead of time when one will need to be whisked away to an Emergency Room and a hospital! - especially in the case of heart attack and stroke, as examples.
But how many years of your life are you willing to give up to living a lifestyle you don't enjoy (for us more inclined to rural living) in order to close to the ER 'just in case'? People can and do have heart attacks at forty or fifty, so is that a good cutoff for rural living? To me that's like never getting in a car or on a plane or eating in a restaurant because of 'what ifs'. I don't want to live my life not living the lifestyle I enjoy because I live in fear of some unknown risk at some unknown time in the future.
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Old 02-15-2018, 09:42 PM
 
33 posts, read 14,820 times
Reputation: 112
Quote:
Originally Posted by DubbleT View Post
This. People keep saying it's important to be near a doctor, but if you need a specialist your chances of living near one (or more) in a large city are not great. Unless you can afford to live near downtown, or wherever the best medical center is, you will probably still face a twenty or thirty minute drive in traffic to get to your doctors office. Unless you think you are at serious risk of needing to be whisked to the nearest hospital at the drop of a hat I don't see more of a benefit to living in a city to be 'near' health care.

I think these are good points. Living in MA, which is a small state, you would be hard-pressed to find anywhere to live in which you had no access, or exceedingly long drives, to good medical care; or, in the case of something dire, to be quickly whisked off to excellent care. Expensive rural communities will attract good docs for the lifestyle. Poorer places are almost always within a 30-minute drive to the nearest larger town or city; and with MediVac, you can be in Boston at world-class medical centers in under 40 minutes (and often less) from almost any location.

Contrast that with living in any of the super-congested eastern MA areas, and it could take more than 30 minutes to go to a hospital just across town.
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