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Old 03-02-2018, 06:35 AM
 
Location: Central Mexico and Central Florida
7,101 posts, read 3,461,680 times
Reputation: 10163

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Quote:
Originally Posted by NoMoreSnowForMe View Post
Yeah, and sales tax in Mexico is about 16%, and they tax everything. I tried moving there and made it a year. It's a lot more expensive than people think - if you want to basically still live like an American. And by that I mean having running water (even if you can't drink it) and electricity and cable and internet. It's all expensive.
We didn't move to MX because it's cheap....we simply like the climate, the people and the lifestyle. Though many things are cheaper. Eating out is the biggest one for us. Entertainment another huge savings. This year's annual classical/jazz festival ends today: WELCOME – Festival de Febrero

We own a home in a beach town in FL as well as our home here. Both have the same value, around 400K. Real estate taxes in US: 5,000 (to new owner)
Real estate taxes in MX: 250

Insurance FL house (incl. flood): 3,600
Insurance MX house (incl. flood): 200

While valued the same, our houses differ as follows:

FL house: 1800 sq. ft
MX house: 3800 sq. ft

Fl house: no pool
MX house: 40 ft. pool with solar heating

FL house: no water view
MX house: killer water views

FL house location: 1 block from water (small bay)
MX house location: 1 block from water (largest lake in MX, 60 miles wide x 12 miles long)


FL town: can walk to 12+ non-chain eateries see list here:https://www.tripadvisor.com/Restaura...t_Florida.html
MX town: can walk to 24+ non-chain eateries see list here: https://www.tripadvisor.com/Restaura...05-Ajijic.html
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Old 03-02-2018, 01:29 PM
 
Location: West Central Ohio
420 posts, read 234,453 times
Reputation: 627
We are retired living on $1600 a month. House paid off, just regular bills. We own an older car too.
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Old 03-02-2018, 02:05 PM
 
4,079 posts, read 6,419,104 times
Reputation: 4179
I have met many retirees who thought they had enough and were forced to file for bankruptcy all because of excessive medical bills. Many believe that Medicare will cover them. True, but not entirely:
One friend treated for prostate cancer via radiation got a bill from his radiologist for $16k. I told him Medicare to pay most of that and he told me that was after Medicare paid. A neighbor I had moved from his farm in anther state to the retirement community we were living at. One day he told me he had sold his farm for $1 mil. Shortly after that his wife was dx'ed with cancer and over the next two years he went broke and before his wife died ended up maxed out on his CC. Another factor is the dreaded donut hole. Many meds are expensive and force the patient into the donut hole. Hospitals will gladly have you if you are Medicare with a $300 daily copay for the first five days. You will notice that seldom does the hospital keep you longer than five days. Gap insurance was a great option at one time and then the prices went up and up and up. It's tough trying to make ends meet when one is depended on SS as are many who are disabled and can't work.
Rental prices keep rising as so to property taxes but SS increases are few and far between and any increase will usually be swallowed up my Medicare costs.
I have met homeless seniors who by no fault of their own lost everything they worked their lives for. One couple who looked to be in their 80's I met at a rest stop off an interstate. They told me they were homeless but they have their car.
They take turns sleeping in their car during the day because the police will chase them if they try to sleep in their car at night. Then are are many who make the decision between meds or food everyday.
I have also met well-to-do seniors who never seem to have an ailment or financial difficulty.
We work hard all our lives and in the end most of us lose all that we accumulated because of sickness. There are also those medical professionals who are in place to see that our last dollar is milked from us on our deathbed.
If you are a senior with a roof over your head and a warm bed be grateful. There are many who do not.
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Old 03-03-2018, 07:18 AM
 
394 posts, read 157,047 times
Reputation: 1103
Quote:
Originally Posted by donsabi View Post
I have met many retirees who thought they had enough and were forced to file for bankruptcy all because of excessive medical bills. Many believe that Medicare will cover them. True, but not entirely:
One friend treated for prostate cancer via radiation got a bill from his radiologist for $16k. I told him Medicare to pay most of that and he told me that was after Medicare paid. A neighbor I had moved from his farm in anther state to the retirement community we were living at. One day he told me he had sold his farm for $1 mil. Shortly after that his wife was dx'ed with cancer and over the next two years he went broke and before his wife died ended up maxed out on his CC. Another factor is the dreaded donut hole. Many meds are expensive and force the patient into the donut hole. Hospitals will gladly have you if you are Medicare with a $300 daily copay for the first five days. You will notice that seldom does the hospital keep you longer than five days. Gap insurance was a great option at one time and then the prices went up and up and up. It's tough trying to make ends meet when one is depended on SS as are many who are disabled and can't work.
Rental prices keep rising as so to property taxes but SS increases are few and far between and any increase will usually be swallowed up my Medicare costs.
I have met homeless seniors who by no fault of their own lost everything they worked their lives for. One couple who looked to be in their 80's I met at a rest stop off an interstate. They told me they were homeless but they have their car.
They take turns sleeping in their car during the day because the police will chase them if they try to sleep in their car at night. Then are are many who make the decision between meds or food everyday.
I have also met well-to-do seniors who never seem to have an ailment or financial difficulty.
We work hard all our lives and in the end most of us lose all that we accumulated because of sickness. There are also those medical professionals who are in place to see that our last dollar is milked from us on our deathbed.
If you are a senior with a roof over your head and a warm bed be grateful. There are many who do not.
When my mother died in 2016, she was 92. She had about 3 million dollars worth of properties, but very little in the bank. She had been to the hospital many, many, times. The very last time for multi-system organ failure, diabetes, cataracts, cancer, pneumonia, and urinary tract infection. I thought that the final bill would be thousands. I waited and waited for the bill. A few months later a bill appeared for about $500.00. I was shocked. She had been in the hospital the final time for a month. When the doctors told her that the machines were needed to keep her alive, she didn't care. They asked her if she wanted to live. She shouted at them: "I WANT TO LIVE!!!!" Wild eyed, just like that. I told the doctors: "You heard the lady....and by the way, I'll have what she's having." They did everything they could to save her, but she died anyway. My point is that when you are on medicare, you can ask what is covered and what is not. I would refuse to pay that radiation bill of $16K. The radiologist should have been paid by medicare. Don't jump to pay those hospital bills. Have them explain WHY the bill wasn't covered my medicare. Also, most physicians accept the medicare as full payment, especially if the senior patient does not have much money. Negotiate with the hospital before you pay any bill that appears to be excessive.
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Old 03-03-2018, 07:39 AM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
30,682 posts, read 49,449,101 times
Reputation: 19134
I had prostate cancer four years ago, my prostate was removed, now the cancer has returned, last week we met with a radiation oncologist. We had a long conversation with him and we feel that he is very competent at his job. He explained to us the economics of why the costs are so high in his hospital. He is in a border city, they get a lot of medical tourism coming here from Canada. He is not allowed to turn any patient away, every patient seeking treatment must be treated. People come from across the border where they lack medical specialists, so they come here for treatment because we have the specialists. They also lack American insurance that can be billed. For every medical tourist they treat, the expense is carried over to patients with health insurance. As a US servicemember I have pretty good medical coverage, so I am not worried. But it was interesting to hear from him, why his clinic costs so much.

Healthcare can be very expensive. As you go into retirement you will need to find a method to pay for your medical care.

My pension is small. There are many fellow retirees who bring in a lot more money than I do. My budget works for me, largely because I have really good healthcare provided for me [so long as I stay far away from all military bases].

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Old 03-03-2018, 09:08 AM
 
4,079 posts, read 6,419,104 times
Reputation: 4179
To the best of my understanding the Medicare copay for hospital stays are $300/day for the first five days. Unless you have gap insurance that most retirees cannot afford the minimum bill would have been $1500. Where specialists are required many are not in network and that creates extraordinary expenses. If you actually received a bill for $500 consider yourself one of the few lucky ones.

Most medical facilities would like the patient to pay the bill. However, if the patient refuses and the bill goes unpaid for let's say 60-90 days many facilities will turn the bill over to a collection agency. Worse yet is the medical facility will bundle their unpaid bills and sell them off to a collection agency. The collection agency is entitled to what they deem as reasonable costs of collection. Look out for that one! One case I remember where a woman refused to paid a bill for $28 that was disputed lost her house and had her credit ruined because of a collection agency.
If you dispute your bill or any item on that bill then by all means investigate. Call your insurance company for help. If you do indeed owe it you can still try to negotiate the cost or workout a payment play.


" I would refuse to pay that radiation bill of $16K. The radiologist should have been paid by medicare." suziq38
" I told him Medicare to pay most of that and he told me that was after Medicare paid." donsabi

My friend ended up making a deal to pay $100/mo. You need to be careful that the medical treatment you are receiving is from an IN NETWORK doctor.
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Old 03-03-2018, 10:08 AM
 
11,131 posts, read 8,540,714 times
Reputation: 28094
Quote:
Originally Posted by rodentraiser View Post
Mine is subsidized housing but it's not Section 8. Section 8 is closed again in my city because there's too long a waiting list for it.
Same difference. You're taking money from the government. To some, that makes you an undesirable neighbor.
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Old 03-03-2018, 10:56 AM
 
162 posts, read 91,793 times
Reputation: 293
imagine those medicare-expensive stories with one small change. include a high-deductible plan F medigap plan.
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Old 03-03-2018, 11:31 AM
 
11,988 posts, read 5,122,573 times
Reputation: 18743
It's still better than a lot of regular medical insurance policies. I have medical insurance through work and pay a premium for it every month which isn't cheap. If I need to see a doctor it has to be a doctor from their list of approved doctors which means a waiting period of 3 weeks or more to see one. Oh and let's not forget a high co-pay on top of that.
A co-worker had a heart attack and insurance only pays a percentage of a hospital stay. He ended up owing $25,000 to the hospital even with insurance.
Medicare sounds like a God send to me.
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Old 03-03-2018, 12:50 PM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
30,682 posts, read 49,449,101 times
Reputation: 19134
I just got a letter today from my insurance, it says they have pre-approved my chemo treatments for 6 months. There should be a $12 co-pay I expect to pay.
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