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Old 03-02-2018, 09:29 AM
 
1,183 posts, read 763,984 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by matisse12 View Post
I give up. A poster inaccurately and erroneously posts that Ibuprofen is 'hard on the liver' when it's actually Tylenol (acetaminophen) which can be hard on the liver at higher doses or when mixed with alcohol.

Ibuprofen can be hard on the kidneys; Ibuprofen is not hard on the liver.
all NSAIDs can be hard on the kidneys.
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Old 03-02-2018, 03:32 PM
 
Location: TX
3,931 posts, read 4,707,426 times
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Recent research has shown that use of Ibuprofen slightly increases your chances of heart attack and stroke, keep that in mind also.
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Old 03-02-2018, 04:05 PM
 
Location: SW Florida
9,766 posts, read 7,052,411 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NYgal1542 View Post
I spoke with a pharmacist this afternoon.

I asked him about Meloxicam and Etodolac.

He stated they both need to be closely watched when a patient is using it. Please, I don't understand the chemistry of things...... that is why I did consult with the pharmacist. I'm taking his word for it as I believe he knows more about it than I do. They may differ in some of their ingredients, but overall, still need to be watched.

It was explained to me that the Meloxicam (or Etodolac) can have the effect of reducing what the blood pressure medicine in being taken for.

old fed: Thank you for making a good point. But the new doctor is replacing a P.A. I was seeing in same practice. She may have not examined me but she has been privy to test results, etc.
If you've checked out drug interactions you have to have noticed how long that list is, with categories ranging from life-threatening to moderate, to possible and even theoretical. As you've said, NSAIDS ( including meloxicam) can reduce the effectiveness of beta blockers ( including metoprolol). I think I read this as in the moderate category where the risk to benefit ratio of taking both may be considered in taking both, that is, that you might still take both if you gain benefits from doing so, your blood pressure is under control and you get pain relief from the meloxicam. This is where the information from the pharmacist might come in, where both and you, and your new doctor watch you for increases in blood pressure which could be caused by that interaction. In that case, your doctor might increase the dose of metoprolol, or switch your blood pressure medicine to another category not known to interact with NSAIDS, such as calcium channel blockers ( diltiazem, verapamil, amlodipine), or angiotensin II receptor inhibitors ( losartan, valsartan) which are effective at blood pressure control.

IMO if taking both your current dose of metoprolol ER and the meloxicam is working for you, it's worth discussing this with your new physician.
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Old 03-02-2018, 04:13 PM
 
5,431 posts, read 3,458,283 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Travelassie View Post

If you've checked out drug interactions you have to have noticed how long that list is, with categories ranging from life-threatening to moderate, to possible and even theoretical. As you've said, NSAIDS ( including meloxicam) can reduce the effectiveness of beta blockers ( including metoprolol).

I think I read this as in the moderate category where the risk to benefit ratio of taking both may be considered in taking both, that is, that you might still take both if you gain benefits from doing so, your blood pressure is under control and you get pain relief from the meloxicam.

This is where the information from the pharmacist might come in, where both and you, and your new doctor watch you for increases in blood pressure which could be caused by that interaction. In that case, your doctor might increase the dose of metoprolol, or switch your blood pressure medicine to another category not known to interact with NSAIDS, such as calcium channel blockers ( diltiazem, verapamil, amlodipine), or angiotensin II receptor inhibitors ( losartan, valsartan) which are effective at blood pressure control.

IMO if taking both your current dose of metoprolol ER and the meloxicam is working for you, it's worth discussing this with your new physician.
very good advice from Travelassie. I've taken Ibuprofen (for arthritis) along with Metoprolol Succinate ER for decades, and my blood pressure remains in complete control and at proper levels; my blood pressure has even gone down remarkably in retirement, and I've been able to cut my doses of Metoprolol Succinate ER and Lisinopril in half.

just mentioning this, and I realize Ibuprofen and Meloxicam are different, though both are NSAID's.

Last edited by matisse12; 03-02-2018 at 05:18 PM..
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Old 03-02-2018, 05:53 PM
 
326 posts, read 566,191 times
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My mom is a stroke victim (due to doctor negligence) who is doing very well, she is on Toprol, Lisinopril, Amlodopine, Warfarin, and generic Lipitor. Her physical therapist said it was a good idea to have her checked by a neurologist, so I took her and when she complained of body aches, he wrote a script for Meloxicam! I was shocked and disgusted at the doctor because I remembered the tv commercials for Meloxicam warn of stroke and heart attack side effects from that drug! When I told her cardiologist, he said no way will Mom take Meloxicam! It turns out that neurologist was charged with making millions from Medicare fraud a few months later! I agree, don't trust the doctors, (I keep my Mom away from most of them now), do your own research, it might save your life someday!
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Old 03-02-2018, 06:08 PM
 
Location: Central NY
4,686 posts, read 3,256,586 times
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^^^^^^^^^ This.

Not a similar story to the above, but regarding neurologist. I am sure there are many excellent ones out there. But I haven't met one yet.

When I got more involved in my sister's problems, I offered to go with her to her appointment with the neurologist. From the moment I met him, my skin crawled. I did not like him at all and he treated my sister like a 3 year old. She was a Medicaid patient so I am guessing (no true knowledge of this)....... that he may have been one of the few who took Medicaid patients.

I don't recall talking to anyone about him. I've been involved in a lot of things and I don't remember every last thing I did with her (my sister). But a few short months after visiting this "doctor", he was arrested and stripped of his medical license.

I can say it was heart-warming. He was accused of a lot of things. Justice can prevail.
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Old 03-02-2018, 06:17 PM
 
Location: Southern California
23,787 posts, read 8,308,152 times
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I like Dr. Stephen Sinatra's advice on heart health and take his advice to keep my heart healthy. He's a cardiologist but not the conventional ANYMORE. Magnesium, L-Carnitene, COQ10, DRibose are his 4 main ones for heart health, I take all but Carnitene.

I take Ibuprofen to calm arthritis pain and inflammation too and HOPE my kidneys are holding up. Take a couple BP meds too.

Everything else supplements except desiccated thyroid support.

I don't buy into the cholesterol fear and for a blood thinner, grape seed extract is my all body workhorse.
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Old 03-07-2018, 10:11 AM
 
28 posts, read 9,771 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jaminhealth View Post
I like Dr. Stephen Sinatra's advice on heart health and take his advice to keep my heart healthy. He's a cardiologist but not the conventional ANYMORE. Magnesium, L-Carnitene, COQ10, DRibose are his 4 main ones for heart health, I take all but Carnitene.

I take Ibuprofen to calm arthritis pain and inflammation too and HOPE my kidneys are holding up. Take a couple BP meds too.

Everything else supplements except desiccated thyroid support.

I don't buy into the cholesterol fear and for a blood thinner, grape seed extract is my all body workhorse.

Definitely. Most people don't get enough of either of those nutrients from their diet. Especially CoQ10 since we don't eat organ meats (or maybe I should just speak for myself). Be sure to look for a water and fat-soluble CoQ10 for better absorption! I'm sure Sinatra touches on that somewhere. You don't need to pay Sinatra prices though. Just shop around for quality brands on Amazon!
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Old 03-09-2018, 12:43 PM
 
Location: Las Vegas
13,895 posts, read 25,347,447 times
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If this were me, I would read everything I could about these meds and make up my own mind. Probably the safest NSAID you can take is plain old aspirin, originally made from the bark of the willow tree. I have been taking 1 a day for probably 40 years now with no ill effects. Makes your blood a little slipperier and thinner but for most people, that's a good thing!
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Old 03-09-2018, 03:19 PM
 
Location: Southern California
23,787 posts, read 8,308,152 times
Reputation: 15509
Quote:
Originally Posted by yellowsnow View Post
If this were me, I would read everything I could about these meds and make up my own mind. Probably the safest NSAID you can take is plain old aspirin, originally made from the bark of the willow tree. I have been taking 1 a day for probably 40 years now with no ill effects. Makes your blood a little slipperier and thinner but for most people, that's a good thing!
1 per day, oh if only.

I deal with bodywide OA and 1 per day wouldn't touch my little toe.

What I do take along with Ibuprofen is Pain RX and one can read about it online. It's a Cox 2 inhibitor and buy from one of my online supplement companies. Some could get away with Pain RX only depending on their pain levels.
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