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Old 02-25-2010, 06:43 PM
 
8,179 posts, read 11,900,573 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rdhusa View Post
I found this thread this evening and read it from start to finish. Thank you for this, and I'm very pleased now that I got to the end of the thread to see that it is still active.

What has struck me throughout is how little talk or discussion there has been about the importance of money (excluding the few posts during the economic downturn).
That's because the specific focus of this thread is on the emotional and psychological aspects of retirement. There are numerous threads on this forum that deal with the financial ramifications.
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Old 02-25-2010, 08:27 PM
 
Location: In the Pearl of the Purchase, Ky
7,402 posts, read 12,935,643 times
Reputation: 30933
Feb. 1 made 2 years since I retired. My wife retired a year and a half before I did. Those of you who have read other posts of mine know this, but my wife and I were married 6 years living 70 miles apart. Not because we wanted to, but because of jobs and family. That was the first thing I enjoyed about retirement. Being able to be with my best friend 24/7. It's nice waking up and seeing her laying there asleep in the same bed instead of her calling to say good morning.
Since retirement we've travelled some, but all by car. Suits me! That way we can go on our own schedule, stopping where we want to and taking our time if we want to. My step daughter and family lived about 10 hours away. We made a 2 day trip out of it and enjoyed every minute.
My job, for 26 years, was with the state highway department. When it starts snowing we had to get out ahead of it and treat the roads and keep trucks on the road around the clock till the snow was over and all roads cleared. I don't miss those phone calls around 2 or 3 AM telling me I had to come to work, then working 16 hour shifts. I worked with some hard working men and women. I still go back every now and then and stop by to visit.
I like fishing. We live 15 miles from the largest lake, by acreage, east of the Mississippi River. And I STILL can't catch anything! But I like to go! My wife and I started camping last summer. I've camped off and on since I was 3. This was her first camping trip in 31 years! She's 59. She got out there and helped put the tent up and get everything set up and ready. When it was time to go, you better look out and hope you don't get in her way packing up. Our first camping trip was for 2 nights. But the first morning after breakfast, we drove to the front gate and told them we wanted 2 more nights. She's been big on geneology for around 40 years. She found two sites online where you can help people with their family tree in our area. One site is if you want a picture of a descendant's monument. We've found little old cemeteries that you almost need a chain saw to get to, but we get the pictures A lot of the time we're just taking it easy around the house. It's funny to be in the same house and message each other on the computers. She sent me a message asking if I could get her a cup of coffee. And yes, I did! lol
Instead of just rambling on I guess I could have just said retirement is for enjoying being with the one you love. One, of many, good thing about marrying somebody who has been married before (3rd for both of us and the third time is most definitely the charm) is more grandkids to spoil! Been able to do that quite a bit without the 7-3:30 routine.
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Old 02-25-2010, 10:49 PM
 
2 posts, read 3,965 times
Reputation: 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by MadManofBethesda View Post
That's because the specific focus of this thread is on the emotional and psychological aspects of retirement. There are numerous threads on this forum that deal with the financial ramifications.

That is precisely why I asked my question. I wasn't asking to figure out how to make or keep money; perhaps I obscured that when I posted my personal situation. What I really intended to ask was about the impact of money on happiness in retirement, how does it effect one emotionally and psychologically? Is it as important as many in the financial media would have us believe? Or has it turned out to be just one of many factors, maybe further down on the list of what's important? I'm really interested in hearing thoughts from those that have been retired for a few years.
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Old 02-26-2010, 12:04 AM
 
Location: Sacramento
13,784 posts, read 23,798,899 times
Reputation: 6195
Quote:
Originally Posted by rdhusa View Post
What I really intended to ask was about the impact of money on happiness in retirement, how does it effect one emotionally and psychologically? Is it as important as many in the financial media would have us believe? Or has it turned out to be just one of many factors, maybe further down on the list of what's important? I'm really interested in hearing thoughts from those that have been retired for a few years.
I've been retired a little over three years now. In my view money is important if you don't have enough to be reasonably comfortable. I can't define what that means, it differs for each of us.

I view social connections and ability to delve into stuff of interest to me, instead of work requirements, as a major issue in retirement. I have found that some level of community involvement has been psychologically beneficial, along with being able to get into items of interest to me. So I guess I'd sum it up by stating that from my perspective, money is a maintenance issue, but not a "source" of contentment.
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Old 02-26-2010, 03:38 AM
 
2,024 posts, read 2,985,773 times
Reputation: 1812
Quote:
Originally Posted by rdhusa View Post
That is precisely why I asked my question. I wasn't asking to figure out how to make or keep money; perhaps I obscured that when I posted my personal situation. What I really intended to ask was about the impact of money on happiness in retirement, how does it effect one emotionally and psychologically? Is it as important as many in the financial media would have us believe? Or has it turned out to be just one of many factors, maybe further down on the list of what's important? I'm really interested in hearing thoughts from those that have been retired for a few years.
Being retired w/o enough disposable income to enjoy travelling or other activities would be miserable. Being still young-ish and fit enough to enjoy travelling and having plenty of time to do it is very important..to me anyway.
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Old 02-26-2010, 05:52 AM
 
Location: Ohio
668 posts, read 1,904,133 times
Reputation: 816
I retired at 49, and that will be about 5 years ago soon...
Since then, all the back problems I recieved over the years of back breaking work, finally caught up with me and I now have arthritus in my lower back! (Thanks to the idiots I worked for, who believed it was cheaper to call the next guy out for 'your' job, then to get machines needed to do the work properly).
I worked shift for 25 years, and it took me 3 years to finally get over the feeling that I should be up all night, or sleeping during the day or what ever at different times that happened to be the shift I was on. (Wife couldnt understand it, but then again, she didnt work much shift work).

I do take time out to swing on my outdoor swing, and watch the birds at the feeder we provide for them, and they automatically know, when they see my wife and myself on the swing, breakfast is served!!

I dont walk much, because I need two canes now, to get around, and pain meds in order to stand up for awhile.

My buddy, (my assistant), just passed away last month, he was only 59, and I believe I was the only City Employee that even came to see him!! He was well liked by everyone he met, but, I reckon that when your retired, you dont keep up with such things..(If his family hadnt of called me, because they knew how close he and I were, then I wouldnt have known either!).

I dont read the newspapers anymore...Cant get them to deliver where I live, and too painful to walk to get it. I can see a lot of it online, but, its not like 'holding' a piece of newsprint in your hands!

My wife tries to keep me busy, since I dont work anymore, watering the garden she puts in, and the flowers, plus keeping the birdfeeder filled, and inside the house, I get to peel the potatoes for supper LOL...I kep telling her, them thar tatters have eyes, and they be lookin at me!!!

Life has slowed way down for me, since I retired. I get waited on by my wife, and I am mostly on the computer in the winter playing war games from sun up to sun down and when ever I decide to go to bed.

My Wife keeps track of all my Doctor appointments on the calendar, and when ever she is gone from the house, all I have to do, is look on the calendar to see where she is also...

I dont keep in touch with 'old friends', since I never liked them when I was working. Occasionally, if some one dies, I am notified by someone whom I worked with, either before the funeral, or months afterwards.

Most people in my line of work, die a year after they retire, so, every day I draw breath, I am 'beating the system' and I plan on doing that for as long as the medication and pacemaker keeps me ticking, and if that doesnt work, my wife will beat on my chest just so that she has someone who will listen to her LOL

I wish you well...

Jesse
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Old 01-08-2013, 11:15 AM
 
Location: Virginia
18,717 posts, read 26,895,868 times
Reputation: 42861
Laura, this has to be one of my favorite threads of all time. I just re-read it, now that I'm at that stage of actually transitioning into retirement, and your insight continues to impress me.
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Old 01-08-2013, 07:33 PM
 
2,036 posts, read 1,945,197 times
Reputation: 3446
i agree, thanks for a great thread that has "held up" over the years and I hope in a few years I can contribute some thoughts as well...
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Old 01-09-2013, 07:11 AM
 
Location: LEAVING CD
22,952 posts, read 22,521,157 times
Reputation: 15493
Quote:
Originally Posted by woodworkingmenace View Post
I retired at 49, and that will be about 5 years ago soon...
Since then, all the back problems I recieved over the years of back breaking work, finally caught up with me and I now have arthritus in my lower back! (Thanks to the idiots I worked for, who believed it was cheaper to call the next guy out for 'your' job, then to get machines needed to do the work properly).
I worked shift for 25 years, and it took me 3 years to finally get over the feeling that I should be up all night, or sleeping during the day or what ever at different times that happened to be the shift I was on. (Wife couldnt understand it, but then again, she didnt work much shift work).

I do take time out to swing on my outdoor swing, and watch the birds at the feeder we provide for them, and they automatically know, when they see my wife and myself on the swing, breakfast is served!!

I dont walk much, because I need two canes now, to get around, and pain meds in order to stand up for awhile.

My buddy, (my assistant), just passed away last month, he was only 59, and I believe I was the only City Employee that even came to see him!! He was well liked by everyone he met, but, I reckon that when your retired, you dont keep up with such things..(If his family hadnt of called me, because they knew how close he and I were, then I wouldnt have known either!).

I dont read the newspapers anymore...Cant get them to deliver where I live, and too painful to walk to get it. I can see a lot of it online, but, its not like 'holding' a piece of newsprint in your hands!

My wife tries to keep me busy, since I dont work anymore, watering the garden she puts in, and the flowers, plus keeping the birdfeeder filled, and inside the house, I get to peel the potatoes for supper LOL...I kep telling her, them thar tatters have eyes, and they be lookin at me!!!

Life has slowed way down for me, since I retired. I get waited on by my wife, and I am mostly on the computer in the winter playing war games from sun up to sun down and when ever I decide to go to bed.

My Wife keeps track of all my Doctor appointments on the calendar, and when ever she is gone from the house, all I have to do, is look on the calendar to see where she is also...

I dont keep in touch with 'old friends', since I never liked them when I was working. Occasionally, if some one dies, I am notified by someone whom I worked with, either before the funeral, or months afterwards.

Most people in my line of work, die a year after they retire, so, every day I draw breath, I am 'beating the system' and I plan on doing that for as long as the medication and pacemaker keeps me ticking, and if that doesnt work, my wife will beat on my chest just so that she has someone who will listen to her LOL

I wish you well...

Jesse
Man, it's kind of shocking how parallel our lives have run! I'm pretty much in the same boat as you though not on canes "yet" but if things keep progressing a scooter is on the horizon. . I've been retired since 2000 and am only in my very early 50's.
I constantly push myself and refuse to give in, I'm not ready (mentally) to sit in a rocker and watch the world go by though I think the wife would prefer I do so as she hates seeing me in pain.
Over the years the one thing I've found that's a definite have to which is to find something, anything to keep at least your mind busy and realize that any project started today doesn't have to be finished on any particular time line.
Look into a class on something that interests you, maybe finish that degree you never had time to get. If you like shooting, reload your own ammo and become good at it (for the experts it's an art). Go to harbor freight and pick up some wood working tools, see what you can create. Try quilting. Don't laugh, my wife has drug me into several of her projects and it will keep your mind very busy on the intricate ones not to mention you end up with something useful. If you really get into it you could get a long arm quilting machine and actually make money quilting others projects, my wife just paid $200 to an older gentleman to quilt a couch blanket since we don't have a large enough machine.
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Old 01-09-2013, 08:22 AM
 
Location: We_tside PNW (Columbia Gorge) / CO / SA TX / Thailand
22,527 posts, read 39,903,732 times
Reputation: 23634
Quote:
Originally Posted by woodworkingmenace View Post
I retired at 49, and that will be about 5 years ago soon...
Since then, all the back problems I recieved over the years of back breaking work, finally caught up with me ...I worked shift for 25 years, .

..I wish you well...

Jesse
Wonderful (ironic) wake-up call. thx

28 yrs of 'shifts' for me, but fortunatly I am still ticking (And hopping).

but... I just took a look in the Mirror after getting out of the shower Something better change! QUICK

Thx, WWM; and best wishes on your health issues. I hope you were eligible for medical benefits and pension. I missed mine by 6 wks, when outsourced at age 49. (16+ yrs to SS / MC). I had 32 yrs of service, so mine would have been FREE.
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