U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Retirement
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 10-22-2016, 05:21 AM
 
Location: Planet Woof
3,139 posts, read 3,511,151 times
Reputation: 9889

Advertisements

Most seniors don't retire with huge savings because most of us ''working poor'' lived paycheck to paycheck'' when we weren't laid off. Some didn't even do that when ''under-employed''.
Health insurance? Haven't had any in 4 years because they don't pay contractors and part-timers benefits. ACA plan at 400 a month when income is 1200? Don't think so.
Pension and 401K? Naw. Lost during the Great Recession.
For slobs like us SS brings in income security and the promise of some form of health insurance in 3 years.
Not complaining, just saying that for many of us there is a vastly different concept of retirement out there.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 10-22-2016, 05:41 AM
 
Location: Central Massachusetts
4,800 posts, read 4,851,516 times
Reputation: 6379
Quote:
Originally Posted by FeelinLow View Post
Most seniors don't retire with huge savings because most of us ''working poor'' lived paycheck to paycheck'' when we weren't laid off. Some didn't even do that when ''under-employed''.
Health insurance? Haven't had any in 4 years because they don't pay contractors and part-timers benefits. ACA plan at 400 a month when income is 1200? Don't think so.
Pension and 401K? Naw. Lost during the Great Recession.
For slobs like us SS brings in income security and the promise of some form of health insurance in 3 years.
Not complaining, just saying that for many of us there is a vastly different concept of retirement out there.
Yes this is absolutely true. This forum though is a great help to those in any circumstances. Most folks here are very nice and helpful. They have good ideas and ask great questions. Some are even experts in many of the questions that have been asked from SS, and insurance to pensions and annuities.

Sorry that you got hit hard in the recent markets. These markets are tough and unforgiving. We do have to be thankful that SS is there to help as flawed as the system is. Much of the rest of the civilized world has followed us and enacted a system like it.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-22-2016, 05:54 PM
 
Location: Planet Woof
3,139 posts, read 3,511,151 times
Reputation: 9889
Yeah, I love this forum, obviously. I just wanted to speak for those who are not so financially well off and are just trying to survive.
Many who post here ARE well off and have means beyond at least my and many other's experience. Good for them.
I am doing ok now and have found financial safety and contentment with 2 contract jobs and the prospect of my SS next year.
Got a roof and food on the table and my health and am grateful for the little things.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-23-2016, 11:07 AM
 
Location: Idaho
1,455 posts, read 1,156,701 times
Reputation: 5500
Quote:
Originally Posted by LauraC View Post
I'm wondering if other retirees 1) feel the same way about not missing their work; 2) didn't stay close to their work friends in retirement but remained in communication with non-work friends from decades ago; 3) now think differently about people who are older than they are; 4) are now more appreciative/observant of their surroundings; 5) kept their same good/bad personal habits; 6) are now more interested in their town/area; 7) slowed down (not physically, but no longer rush anywhere)
It has been exactly 1 year since my last work day. I enjoyed reading others' reflections of their retirement experience and would like to share mine below.

Here are my answers to LauraC' s questions.

Since I still enjoyed my work when I made the difficult decision of volunteering for the buyout, I did miss my work but not as often as I had feared. For many years, my career defined me, gave me a framework for living, contributed greatly to my sense of purpose. I am glad that even though my retirement came a bit earlier than planned, I had prepared for it by finding replacement avenues in my avocations (flying, rowing, hiking, traveling and volunteering). In retirement, I also found myself subconsciously applying my 'work thinking system' to daily activities: prioritizing, optimizing, organizing, planning, scheduling etc I am glad that I took the course and training to be an US Rowing Coach early last year. The coaching and event coordination activities of my rowing club had given me tremendous satisfaction.

Quite a few of my close friends were my co-workers, and I really miss the daily interactions (both work and personal) so I went out for lunches a number of time with some former teammates. Last June, I was invited to join a 'meetup' group consisting of current and retired engineers of my former workplace. It has been a lot of fun to meet former colleagues for monthly dinners and to participate in group event such as a long 'leaf peeping' hike to a Catskill mountain two weeks ago.

Regarding my feeling about seniors of different age groups, I have always greatly admired active, vibrant and upbeat older people. As I had mentioned in several previous postings, several of them were my role models. So to answer Laura's question, I do not think any differently about older people. In the last year or so, I have been reading this forum almost daily so I have known more about retirees' thoughts and feelings. My readings confirmed my thinking that what defines a person's vitality is their attitude about life and not the number of their years on earth. Sadly, as I had stated in the thread about 'things bother you in retirement', there had been a disproportionate number of pessimistic, regretful and backward-looking posts in this forum. I do not know whether because unhappy people are more likely to express their feelings or whether this is the result of a contentious election year and the not fully-recovered economic condition. I take comfort in the fact that this sour mood is not prevalent in my circle of friends/acquaintances and not reflected in quite a few seniors surveys and studies.

Like Laura, I have become more appreciative/observant of my surroundings. I have always been an outdoor person and a nature lover. Now with more leisure time, I can slow down, take more breaks in my daily rowing and hiking to soak in the sun rays, to marvel at wild mushrooms shaping like a giant clam shell or delicately shaped wild flowers, to watch eagles/hawks soaring, a white swan suddenly appeared on the glassy Hudson river water among the early morning pinkish fog layer, to gaze at cloud formation, aglow hills etc. I have had these reflective moments in my life before but they have become more frequent, as fulfilling and satisfying as the thrills of discoveries, the excitement of adventures, the past pride of educational/professional achievement.

Regarding personal habits, I am happy to see that I have made some improvements in the bad category Being in retirement, I no longer have excuses to delay taking care of life obligations (paying bills, filing taxes, fixing broken things etc.) until the last minutes. I have also established some new good habits such as putting things where they belong RIGHT AWAY, getting things done ahead of time (like filling my water bottle the moment I came home from rowing ready for the next morning row etc.), being systematic and organized in as many daily activities as possible. For example, I came up with mental 3-step checklist for setting the alarm clock after failing to get up in time for a promised double sculling session with a friend. 1. Set the time 2. Check the volume 3. Push the slider to set the alarm). This 1-2-3 (or more) check lists have helped me to correct quite a few of past mistakes such as draining the car battery by leaving the interior lights on!

Just as with becoming more appreciate of my surroundings, I now have the time to become more interested in my town and area. We have discovered so many great hiking trails, have spent the time to explore local attractions. We have also taken advantages of many free or low-cost concerts offered by nearby colleges. This afternoon, we will attend a concert at Bard College, " Music Alive! Gen Y!". Last year, we attended another contemporary music concert by composers in their late teens and twenties and it was thoroughly enjoyable.

About the slowing down part, although I have had some reflective, slowing down moments, I am still a person who-could-not-sit-still for long person. There are always so many things to do. In the first half of my 1st retirement year, I spent many more hours per day on tasks and home projects than at work. Even when we decided to slow down, to take a break in the home repairs, downsizing tasks to enjoy some travels in the last 5-6 months, I still felt 'rushed' with so many things to plan and to do for each trip. It took a lot of preparation and work but I had a lot of fun in my research/planning. Everything went as planned for each trip (yes, I have a spreadsheet for the itinerary, a checklist and a document folder for each trip!). We had fabulous time in each trip. The best thing was that there was no piles of unread work emails and delayed tasks to catch up at the end of each 'vacation'.

The bottom line is that I have thoroughly enjoyed my 1st year in retirement. There are still many tasks to do to prepare for relocation: to continue with our research/decision to find a retirement location, new home, to downsize, to fix up the house for resale etc. I would be lying if I don't admit feeling overwhelmed and somewhat stressed out when thinking about these difficult tasks. However, I have slowly resolved to think in terms of one-step at a time, not to impose a moving deadline but just set a goal to get things moving. We will relocate in a near future to be closer to my daughter, to start a 'new' life in a new environment. I remain optimistic about my future and will not let fear about potential setback like illnesses, old age decline towards decrepitude etc. to limit our choice in life.

Last edited by BellaDL; 10-23-2016 at 11:32 AM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-26-2016, 01:36 PM
 
Location: RVA
2,172 posts, read 1,268,333 times
Reputation: 4480
Nice upbeat post!!deserved a rep!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-27-2016, 04:22 AM
 
Location: Central Massachusetts
4,800 posts, read 4,851,516 times
Reputation: 6379
Quote:
Originally Posted by BellaDL View Post
It has been exactly 1 year since my last work day. I enjoyed reading others' reflections of their retirement experience and would like to share mine below.....

The bottom line is that I have thoroughly enjoyed my 1st year in retirement. There are still many tasks to do to prepare for relocation: to continue with our research/decision to find a retirement location, new home, to downsize, to fix up the house for resale etc. I would be lying if I don't admit feeling overwhelmed and somewhat stressed out when thinking about these difficult tasks. However, I have slowly resolved to think in terms of one-step at a time, not to impose a moving deadline but just set a goal to get things moving. We will relocate in a near future to be closer to my daughter, to start a 'new' life in a new environment. I remain optimistic about my future and will not let fear about potential setback like illnesses, old age decline towards decrepitude etc. to limit our choice in life.
BellaDL absolutely a wonderful post. I removed most but folks don't have to look hard to see the entire post. I did want to focus on your "bottom line". It is something people should attempt to do always. Plan ahead, take steps one step at a time and prepare for the time of the changes. Take the changes in slower increments. I am not saying take the switch from work to retirement in increments. Sometimes that is not available to us. But as you near that time begin to make plans. Grab ideas from forums like this. Ask family and friends for ideas. Bounce ideas of them and gage the plans. Most plans usually involve the largest investment people have in their homes. Do you stay or do you go? Are you needing to downsize? Will you be moving far or staying near family and the home you live in prior?

Bella you also mention and considered potential setbacks and illnesses. These considerations are nearly as important as to the timing of your retirement. It makes perfect sense to consider your first moves out of retirement temporary as well. You could be moving once again later in life to AL or a CCRC. So much to consider that it can feel overwhelming.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-27-2016, 04:46 AM
 
Location: Central New Jersey
2,407 posts, read 916,924 times
Reputation: 4261
Age 46. Retired 7 weeks ago. Great pension, full benefits. Once I reached my 25 year mark there really was no reason to stay.
Miss it? No way
Work friends were just that. I made it a point to leave work at work.
Will I look for employment of some kind in the future? Possibly but not financially necessary.
For now I'm just enjoying life and trying to clear my mind and eyes of all the scars I've seen in my 25 years "on the job".
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-29-2016, 07:38 PM
 
Location: Iowa
32 posts, read 85,336 times
Reputation: 52
One thing I do know is I work for the government now and I can not wait to get away and leave all the fake, no caring people behind! I am single and hope to move to Florida..... This gives me hope!!!!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-17-2016, 02:20 PM
 
2,737 posts, read 3,271,657 times
Reputation: 4101
In 2007 (at age 47), my plan was to retire at 58. I'm now 56, but a horrific divorce resulted in having to turn over the house I paid to my ex-wife, plus paying her "lifetime Alimony." This has extended any plans of retirement into my mid 60's. I don't dread having to work longer than anticipated. Fortunately, I enjoy my work and the great majority of guys I work with.


Even though I'm at least 8 to 10 years from retirement, the thought of retiring is starting to impress itself upon me. Aside from reading, writing, working out, hiking, and the occasional gourmet cooking, I don't engage in other social activities. My closest friends live thousands of miles away. I often find myself contemplating on what to do after retirement.


Has anyone else gone through the same? If so, how was it after you retired?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-18-2016, 02:53 AM
 
Location: Wildside of Oahu
1,412 posts, read 2,785,050 times
Reputation: 2433
Quote:
Originally Posted by chacho_keva View Post
In 2007 (at age 47), my plan was to retire at 58. I'm now 56, but a horrific divorce resulted in having to turn over the house I paid to my ex-wife, plus paying her "lifetime Alimony." This has extended any plans of retirement into my mid 60's. I don't dread having to work longer than anticipated. Fortunately, I enjoy my work and the great majority of guys I work with.


Even though I'm at least 8 to 10 years from retirement, the thought of retiring is starting to impress itself upon me. Aside from reading, writing, working out, hiking, and the occasional gourmet cooking, I don't engage in other social activities. My closest friends live thousands of miles away. I often find myself contemplating on what to do after retirement.


Has anyone else gone through the same? If so, how was it after you retired?
Was the lifetime alimony due to her staying home and raising your children? And the house....she had no part of the care and maintenence of the family home? You have no friends within a thousand miles. Wonder why?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Retirement
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top