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Old 04-08-2008, 07:33 AM
 
Location: Sacramento
13,784 posts, read 23,803,102 times
Reputation: 6195

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Quote:
Originally Posted by LauraC View Post
It seems strange though. I feel like maybe I just parked in my former town for 12 years. My former town suffered from living in the shadows of DC. Everyone got up in the morning and went someplace else to work. We got two sets of TV stations, DC and Baltimore which contributed to identity confusion. Professional teams that played in Maryland called themselves DC teams. You'd go to a concert clearly in Maryland and it was called a DC concert. The town celebrated zero holidays because, in my opinion, 1) the town couldn't compete with the really big doings in DC; 2) most of the town was headquarter feds meaning they were typically at the end of their career and had a lot of leave accumulated. They didn't hang around on the holidays. I feel like the whole purpose of my former town was to provide a safe place to sleep and a not awful commute. I agree that retirement is a great adventure. There are new things to see, learn and do and if you pick a good spot for retirement, a lot of those things are free or cheap.

I think that is just a function of living in suburban DC. The area is odd because few folks who live in the metro area were raised, or plan on retiring, there. I found few folks who had family in the area, they generally went "home" to somewhere else for holidays. Also, it is a metro area of ultra high achievers, incredible focus on either career and advancement or issue advocacy. The atmosphere is much more intense and serious than other location in the country.

I haven't found other cities to be like metro DC whatsoever, so that background might give you a different "spin" on retirement than other folks would experience.
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Old 04-08-2008, 02:48 PM
 
Location: Tennessee
34,675 posts, read 33,681,492 times
Reputation: 51867
Quote:
Originally Posted by NewToCA View Post
I think that is just a function of living in suburban DC. The area is odd because few folks who live in the metro area were raised, or plan on retiring, there. I found few folks who had family in the area, they generally went "home" to somewhere else for holidays. Also, it is a metro area of ultra high achievers, incredible focus on either career and advancement or issue advocacy. The atmosphere is much more intense and serious than other location in the country.

I haven't found other cities to be like metro DC whatsoever, so that background might give you a different "spin" on retirement than other folks would experience.
Well, the another place I lived was Long Island, NY and many people commute to NYC. NYC is also full of high achievers. But on Long Island there was more of a town identity, you weren't just a part of the NYC metro area. I think people leave both places when they retire because it's expensive but if the Cheap Fairy waved a magic wand over both areas, I think people would still leave MD on retirement but Long Island people would stay.
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Old 04-08-2008, 07:22 PM
 
28,237 posts, read 39,884,966 times
Reputation: 36740
Quote:
Originally Posted by LauraC View Post
This weekend I will be retired 1 year. I also moved 6 weeks after I retired but I've been reflecting on my retirement and these are the things I've learned.

1. I don't miss work. I worked for the same government agency for 34 years (different jobs). I still use some of my work skills in retirement and I'm very happy I acquired them (useful for hobbies, classes and dealing with people) but I don't miss the job itself and didn't miss it 5 minutes after I walked out the door. Since I was never unhappy at work, this surprised me.

2. Your friends from work are just that. My out-of-state friends that I have had for decades are still the people that keep in touch with me the most often, not the "friends" I worked with daily and who I socialized with on and off the job. I'm not sure if it's because they are still working and I retired and moved away or because they weren't really friends. But, I have also observed that others who retired and didn't move are just "Christmas Card friends," too.

3. Retirees I come in contact with regularly span the ages of 55 - 85 (I'm currently 56) and after the first week or two, I stopped noticing the age difference probably because they all are currently active, intelligent and/or skilled people and many of the older ones, especially, have lead extraordinary interesting lives.

4. I'm more observant and things in my surroundings interest me more now that I'm retired. I fell into the hobby of outdoor photography since I retired and as a result I hear bird sounds, I never heard before, look at trees and flowers, I would have walked right by before. If I see something I've never seen before, I take a photo and research what it is when I get home. I notice when the leaves change, the bugs come out and the flowers bloom. I'm curious about wildlife and farm animal behavior. When I'm standing in line at the store or the Post Office, I actually look around me at the people. I can tell you I lived 12 years in my last town and never visited the town park or explored any nearby location just to look around. I just wasn't interested enough to explore. I've already visited 6 state parks here and one National Park and have a boatload of photos to show for it. I would not have predicted this new interest in my surroundings. I'm always looking forward to visiting new outdoor locations.

5. My TV watching hours and reading habits didn't change when I stopped working. I still buy and read as many books as I used to. I still don't turn on the TV until dinner time. I still prefer to shop online. I still like new software. I still like reading and posting to assorted forums. I still hate housework. I still procrastinate. I still hate walking for the sake of walking (as opposed to walking TO something). I still go to bed when I'm tired, not at any particular hour at night. I still like taking classes/learning new things. In other words, retirement didn't change my good/bad personal habits like I thought it might.

6. I read the local newspaper for local news, city planning and event info. I really didn't care about what was happening in the town I was living in when I was working. I didn't watch local news (except when bad weather might impact the next day's commute) or read the local newspaper. I know more about this town (population pretty close to former town population) I retired to, than the last town I lived in for 12 years while I was working. I recognize people I don't know personally at town activities, now. If had I retired and not moved, would I have developed an interest in my former town? I don't know.

7. I'm never in a hurry/feel I have to rush since being retired. I still have to keep track of what weekly, monthly/annual events are scheduled but I don't look at the clock, just the calendar. I think I set my alarm clock about 3x since I have been retired.


I'm wondering if other retirees 1) feel the same way about not missing their work; 2) didn't stay close to their work friends in retirement but remained in communication with non-work friends from decades ago; 3) now think differently about people who are older than they are; 4) are now more appreciative/observant of their surroundings; 5) kept their same good/bad personal habits; 6) are now more interested in their town/area; 7) slowed down (not physically, but no longer rush anywhere) --- Anyone?
LauraC I am freaking out. Are we married?

I kid you not, I read this post and I swear (except for the being retired part) that my wife wrote it!

She's at 33 years with the Feds. reads voraciously, took a photography class and fell in love with it, etc, etc.

Amazing. Depending on how things work out we'll be in TN in a few.
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Old 04-08-2008, 08:59 PM
 
2,317 posts, read 4,638,924 times
Reputation: 1248
Quote:
Originally Posted by LauraC View Post
This weekend I will be retired 1 year. I also moved 6 weeks after I retired but I've been reflecting on my retirement and these are the things I've learned.

1. I don't miss work. I worked for the same government agency for 34 years (different jobs). I still use some of my work skills in retirement and I'm very happy I acquired them (useful for hobbies, classes and dealing with people) but I don't miss the job itself and didn't miss it 5 minutes after I walked out the door. Since I was never unhappy at work, this surprised me.

2. Your friends from work are just that. My out-of-state friends that I have had for decades are still the people that keep in touch with me the most often, not the "friends" I worked with daily and who I socialized with on and off the job. I'm not sure if it's because they are still working and I retired and moved away or because they weren't really friends. But, I have also observed that others who retired and didn't move are just "Christmas Card friends," too.

3. Retirees I come in contact with regularly span the ages of 55 - 85 (I'm currently 56) and after the first week or two, I stopped noticing the age difference probably because they all are currently active, intelligent and/or skilled people and many of the older ones, especially, have lead extraordinary interesting lives.

4. I'm more observant and things in my surroundings interest me more now that I'm retired. I fell into the hobby of outdoor photography since I retired and as a result I hear bird sounds, I never heard before, look at trees and flowers, I would have walked right by before. If I see something I've never seen before, I take a photo and research what it is when I get home. I notice when the leaves change, the bugs come out and the flowers bloom. I'm curious about wildlife and farm animal behavior. When I'm standing in line at the store or the Post Office, I actually look around me at the people. I can tell you I lived 12 years in my last town and never visited the town park or explored any nearby location just to look around. I just wasn't interested enough to explore. I've already visited 6 state parks here and one National Park and have a boatload of photos to show for it. I would not have predicted this new interest in my surroundings. I'm always looking forward to visiting new outdoor locations.

5. My TV watching hours and reading habits didn't change when I stopped working. I still buy and read as many books as I used to. I still don't turn on the TV until dinner time. I still prefer to shop online. I still like new software. I still like reading and posting to assorted forums. I still hate housework. I still procrastinate. I still hate walking for the sake of walking (as opposed to walking TO something). I still go to bed when I'm tired, not at any particular hour at night. I still like taking classes/learning new things. In other words, retirement didn't change my good/bad personal habits like I thought it might.

6. I read the local newspaper for local news, city planning and event info. I really didn't care about what was happening in the town I was living in when I was working. I didn't watch local news (except when bad weather might impact the next day's commute) or read the local newspaper. I know more about this town (population pretty close to former town population) I retired to, than the last town I lived in for 12 years while I was working. I recognize people I don't know personally at town activities, now. If had I retired and not moved, would I have developed an interest in my former town? I don't know.

7. I'm never in a hurry/feel I have to rush since being retired. I still have to keep track of what weekly, monthly/annual events are scheduled but I don't look at the clock, just the calendar. I think I set my alarm clock about 3x since I have been retired.


I'm wondering if other retirees 1) feel the same way about not missing their work; 2) didn't stay close to their work friends in retirement but remained in communication with non-work friends from decades ago; 3) now think differently about people who are older than they are; 4) are now more appreciative/observant of their surroundings; 5) kept their same good/bad personal habits; 6) are now more interested in their town/area; 7) slowed down (not physically, but no longer rush anywhere) --- Anyone?
Great post,I just retired in nov,07 after 20 years of law enforcement(NYC)
I basically feel the same way,Don't miss work,because when It's time to go
It's time to go.Friends from work were just that,I am not rushed enjoy life and appreciate things more.I moved to PA,were the cost of living and quality of life is better,and making the most of the pension were It goes alot farther.
It's a beautiful thing to be able to retire,It is the next stage of your life to be enjoyed and reap the rewards of your hard work.
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Old 04-08-2008, 10:21 PM
NCN
 
Location: NC/SC Border Patrol
21,135 posts, read 21,878,713 times
Reputation: 23217
I retired in December of 2006. I am surprised that I do not miss work. The biggest change is that I am not tired all the time. Any woman working is really doing two jobs. I left one job but am still a homemaker.

I find those I worked with seem to want to see me more than I want to see them. We have not moved and probably will not move. We both are part of our community. I think I would miss that.

I have a whole new set of retired friends. We do water exercises together 3 times a week. It is a great group and we all care about each other.

I have time to look at the green grass, the butterflies, and the possum that steals our cats food every night. There is a gray cat and a black and white cat that eats here sometimes too.

The thing I enjoy the most is the rest I get when I need it.
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Old 04-09-2008, 05:45 AM
 
Location: DC Area, for now
3,517 posts, read 12,049,244 times
Reputation: 2141
Quote:
Originally Posted by NCN View Post
The thing I enjoy the most is the rest I get when I need it.
I took a retirement class a few years ago and when asked what we were looking forward to the most, almost everyone said being able to get enough sleep.
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Old 04-09-2008, 05:41 PM
 
Location: Sacramento
13,784 posts, read 23,803,102 times
Reputation: 6195
Quote:
Originally Posted by LauraC View Post
Well, the another place I lived was Long Island, NY and many people commute to NYC. NYC is also full of high achievers. But on Long Island there was more of a town identity, you weren't just a part of the NYC metro area. I think people leave both places when they retire because it's expensive but if the Cheap Fairy waved a magic wand over both areas, I think people would still leave MD on retirement but Long Island people would stay.
I suspect you are correct about Long Island folks staying and MD folks leaving. Don't you think that Long Island folks generally grew up in the metro area, and have many family and friend connections? I know if I had stayed in my original hometown of Philadelphia, there is a much greater chance I never would have moved out to California (and I can use a wand pass from the Cheap Fairy).
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Old 04-11-2008, 10:22 AM
 
Location: Tennessee
34,675 posts, read 33,681,492 times
Reputation: 51867
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tek_Freek View Post
LauraC I am freaking out. Are we married?

.
I think I would have noticed you when I woke up this morning.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Tek_Freek View Post
I kid you not, I read this post and I swear (except for the being retired part) that my wife wrote it!

She's at 33 years with the Feds. reads voraciously, took a photography class and fell in love with it, etc, etc.

Amazing. Depending on how things work out we'll be in TN in a few.
She would like it here. Besides all of the wonderful outdoors things to photograph, we have a town camera club that meets once a month. This month someone showed us how still life photography is done but previously we had presentations by a world traveled photojournalist, a freelance wildlife photographer (big animals mostly) and had a photographer talk about his work done in Alaska. We also have occasional within club competitions with a theme. At the local school for retirees, I took classes in beginner photography and photojournalism. In fact, the retiree school is offering a Cumberland Gap Fall Colors: Event and Location Photography class and 3 day trip in October (class is in August) that I signed up for and hope I get. The trip is to practice our photography skills that we learned in the beginner class at Cumberland Gap National Historic Park, Pine Mountain State Park in Kentucky and Wilderness Road State Park in Virginia. I bet your wife would enjoy something like that.

I'm in a nonfiction book group but the retiree school also has a fiction book group and I think either the town or the school has a classics book group, too.

And, from your screen name, I bet I could get you excited, too. Our retiree school summer session of classes includes these 3:

Computational Sciences at the Frontier (5 major computational science projects conducted at Oak Ridge National Laboratory will be discussed - 1 per session): 1) In silico chemistry: catalysis, molecular electronics and nanoscale materials; 2) Death and Transfiguration: Exploring the Mysteries of Exploding Stars through High Performance Computing; 3) Taking The Measure of the Universe: Understanding Type 1a Supernovae; 4)Simulating Free Surface Flows; 5) Modeling Earth's Global Water Cycle.

The Intensifying Search for Extra Terrestrial Intelligence

Cryobiology - Impact, Potential and Underlying Science

Hopefully, I'll be taking classes about reptiles and amphibians, the history of my town and county and pirates along the eastern seacoast in history, in addition to the photography.
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Old 04-11-2008, 10:29 AM
 
Location: NJ
152 posts, read 573,689 times
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LauraC,

Who offers these courses that you are talking about? My son, who lives in Honea Path would like to join the photo club. How should he go about getting in touch with them?
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Old 04-11-2008, 05:24 PM
 
Location: Tennessee
34,675 posts, read 33,681,492 times
Reputation: 51867
Quote:
Originally Posted by rferd View Post
LauraC,

Who offers these courses that you are talking about? My son, who lives in Honea Path would like to join the photo club. How should he go about getting in touch with them?
I live in Oak Ridge, TN. I don't know where Honea Path is. The website for the retiree school is here:

index


but last time I checked the summer catalogue wasn't posted yet. The one on the website is the current semester.

The camera club is not affiliated with the school. It is a town club and the members are not just retirees. If Honea Path is somewhere near Oak Ridge and you want info on the camera club, please send me a private message with your e-mail address and I'll e-mail you the last club newsletter with contact info.
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