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Old 04-12-2008, 01:51 PM
 
28,240 posts, read 39,890,612 times
Reputation: 36746

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Quote:
Originally Posted by LauraC View Post
I think I would have noticed you when I woke up this morning.


I think so. I'm a pretty big target!



She would like it here. Besides all of the wonderful outdoors things to photograph, we have a town camera club that meets once a month. This month someone showed us how still life photography is done but previously we had presentations by a world traveled photojournalist, a freelance wildlife photographer (big animals mostly) and had a photographer talk about his work done in Alaska. We also have occasional within club competitions with a theme. At the local school for retirees, I took classes in beginner photography and photojournalism. In fact, the retiree school is offering a Cumberland Gap Fall Colors: Event and Location Photography class and 3 day trip in October (class is in August) that I signed up for and hope I get. The trip is to practice our photography skills that we learned in the beginner class at Cumberland Gap National Historic Park, Pine Mountain State Park in Kentucky and Wilderness Road State Park in Virginia. I bet your wife would enjoy something like that.

Yes, she would. So would I.


I'm in a nonfiction book group but the retiree school also has a fiction book group and I think either the town or the school has a classics book group, too.

And, from your screen name, I bet I could get you excited, too. Our retiree school summer session of classes includes these 3:

As would my wife. She is a Computer Audit Specialist for the Feds. When I get stuck she's the first call I make.

Computational Sciences at the Frontier (5 major computational science projects conducted at Oak Ridge National Laboratory will be discussed - 1 per session): 1) In silico chemistry: catalysis, molecular electronics and nanoscale materials; 2) Death and Transfiguration: Exploring the Mysteries of Exploding Stars through High Performance Computing; 3) Taking The Measure of the Universe: Understanding Type 1a Supernovae; 4)Simulating Free Surface Flows; 5) Modeling Earth's Global Water Cycle.

The Intensifying Search for Extra Terrestrial Intelligence

Cryobiology - Impact, Potential and Underlying Science

Hopefully, I'll be taking classes about reptiles and amphibians, the history of my town and county and pirates along the eastern seacoast in history, in addition to the photography.
I think we need to make a trip to Oak Ridge and look at land availability.
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Old 04-25-2008, 10:13 AM
 
103 posts, read 318,852 times
Reputation: 56
What a wonderful message from Laura. I just retired from Social Security in January. Trying to get used to being home. I don't miss my job but its hard getting used to being alone at home all day. No one to talk to. My husband still works. I am 55. Its sort of driving me nuts. Retirement and Menopause all at the same time can be alittle crazy ha ha! My job ruined my eyes being on the computer there for 8 hrs. So another job is out of the question. Besides I retired to retire, not to work. Have no family and friends are all grandmothers stuck babysitting so forget them. My friend told me it took her 6 months to get used to retirement.
One thing I am enjoying is getting up anytime I want and go for a walk and enjoy nature. Can't go traveling right now because I have a 15 yr. old Cocker that has heart trouble now.
I do fish and snowmobile but the fish aren't biting this year and we never get any snow for snowmobiling anymore. I am from PA.
I hate the area where we live but love my house and the acres I have. Can't move because of hubby's job.
Thought retirement was going to be wonderful but so far I am just unhappy. But glad to be not working. Does it make sense?
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Old 04-25-2008, 11:41 AM
 
Location: We_tside PNW (Columbia Gorge) / CO / SA TX / Thailand
22,567 posts, read 39,944,045 times
Reputation: 23699
Quote:
Originally Posted by Polaris View Post
Can't go traveling right now because I have a 15 yr. old Cocker that has heart trouble now.
I do fish and snowmobile but the fish aren't biting this year and we never get any snow for snowmobiling anymore. I am from PA.
I hate the area where we live but love my house and the acres I have. Can't move because of hubby's job.
Thought retirement was going to be wonderful but so far I am just unhappy. But glad to be not working. Does it make sense?
Sounds like 'spring fever to me' (after a 'too-long' winter). Winter and spring can be a tough 'retiree' time, especially with one spouse still working.

Too bad you don't have some more freedom during the times your DH is working. and too bad PA is so far from PNW... We have great spring fishing, and currently 200" of snow on the ground at local snow park. (600" total this season !!, bit rare).

but for your interests and activities, I'd be joining up with a hiking or gardening club to meet others and learn more about your area (you might even like it more). I dislike my area too (200+ days of rain + high taxes) but there is lots to do, and I am back in school as an 'early-retiree'. I'm taking on a new course of study in case I will need a job in the future + to learn new stuff. I love gaining information and am happy mosey-ing around talking to folks. I will go to the local 'senior breakfast' just to meet folks and hear local stories. I have taken some of the old folks out for drives and they have enlightened my experience of living here, just from their stories.

Good luck, spring should be here soon.

You might need to venture out and see what's available locally.
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Old 04-25-2008, 05:03 PM
 
Location: home...finally, home .
8,236 posts, read 18,512,788 times
Reputation: 17765
That was a very kind answer that you gave to polaris, jan. (I mistated this on your rep page) . What great advice for all of us.
__________________
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People may not recall what you said to them, but they will always remember how you made them feel .
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Old 04-26-2008, 09:26 AM
 
Location: Tennessee
34,686 posts, read 33,686,426 times
Reputation: 51888
Quote:
Originally Posted by Polaris View Post
What a wonderful message from Laura. I just retired from Social Security in January. Trying to get used to being home. I don't miss my job but its hard getting used to being alone at home all day. No one to talk to. My husband still works. I am 55. Its sort of driving me nuts. Retirement and Menopause all at the same time can be alittle crazy ha ha! My job ruined my eyes being on the computer there for 8 hrs. So another job is out of the question. Besides I retired to retire, not to work. Have no family and friends are all grandmothers stuck babysitting so forget them. My friend told me it took her 6 months to get used to retirement.
One thing I am enjoying is getting up anytime I want and go for a walk and enjoy nature. Can't go traveling right now because I have a 15 yr. old Cocker that has heart trouble now.
I do fish and snowmobile but the fish aren't biting this year and we never get any snow for snowmobiling anymore. I am from PA.
I hate the area where we live but love my house and the acres I have. Can't move because of hubby's job.
Thought retirement was going to be wonderful but so far I am just unhappy. But glad to be not working. Does it make sense?
I think those of us that move in retirement have more of a rebirth. There's more of a sense of discovery in that everything is new, not just the stopping of work. We try new things/have new experiences because we have to, living in a strange land. I also think there are expectations that new people in town will feel awkward, need welcoming, are looking to join things. In other words, we're not viewed as the newly retired but as the new kid in town. I think it might be easier for those of us who weren't joiners/more social/community oriented when we were in the workforce to come into a town as "the new people" and insinuate ourselves in the community rather than "the new retiree" trying to insinuate themselves in a community where they've lived a good number of years. Does that make sense?

It would be good to hear from people who retired and didn't move and how they they became a part of their community, if they weren't a part of it when they were working. I'm thinking those who were active in clubs, churches, charitable organizations, when they were working, keep on keepin' on with those activities in retirement. I'm thinking it's harder for others to make those new connections.
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Old 04-26-2008, 12:58 PM
 
Location: out in Midland County, Texas
60 posts, read 170,919 times
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The original post was extremely helpful!
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Old 04-26-2008, 03:33 PM
 
Location: DC Area, for now
3,517 posts, read 12,050,963 times
Reputation: 2141
Quote:
Originally Posted by LauraC View Post
I think it might be easier for those of us who weren't joiners/more social/community oriented when we were in the workforce to come into a town as "the new people" and insinuate ourselves in the community rather than "the new retiree" trying to insinuate themselves in a community where they've lived a good number of years. Does that make sense?
Interesting idea. I moved while growing up several times and found it much easier to move in the middle of the school year than in the summer or at the beginning - contrary to the popular wisdom. What I found was that in the middle of the school year, I was the new kid and the other kids went out of their way to welcome me so it was easier to make new friends. The times I moved at the beginning, I found I was lost and forgotten in the rush of the kids greeting their old friends they hadn't seen all summer. It was a month or two later that the kids noticed I was new.

This experience seems to be along the same lines - if you move, then all is new but if staying in the same place, then only you are new to the life change and others don't notice?
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Old 04-27-2008, 08:16 AM
 
Location: Want to be in Branson
67 posts, read 140,828 times
Reputation: 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by LauraC View Post
I think those of us that move in retirement have more of a rebirth. There's more of a sense of discovery in that everything is new, not just the stopping of work. We try new things/have new experiences because we have to, living in a strange land. I also think there are expectations that new people in town will feel awkward, need welcoming, are looking to join things. In other words, we're not viewed as the newly retired but as the new kid in town. I think it might be easier for those of us who weren't joiners/more social/community oriented when we were in the workforce to come into a town as "the new people" and insinuate ourselves in the community rather than "the new retiree" trying to insinuate themselves in a community where they've lived a good number of years. Does that make sense?

It would be good to hear from people who retired and didn't move and how they they became a part of their community, if they weren't a part of it when they were working. I'm thinking those who were active in clubs, churches, charitable organizations, when they were working, keep on keepin' on with those activities in retirement. I'm thinking it's harder for others to make those new connections.
Thank you for this post! I don't post on this forum often but I do read it often. A few years ago my DH and I had a conversation about retiring and staying in our current house and town. I told him I didn't want to do that because I was afraid the only thing that would be different was that we just didn't go to work any more. I am a little bit of a loner and it is sometimes hard to come out of my shell if I have my comfort zone around me. Long story short - we bought a condo in a gated golf community in Missouri where we will be moving at the end of the year. We have owned it about 1 year and have already enjoyed it and the new neighborhood. We can't wait to get involved in our new community - we have already made new friends there. We are so excited and the feeling of dread has completely disappeared! I think the key is to give yourself new challenges. That can probably be done in your current community but you have to put yourself out there. I don't think it will come to you.
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Old 04-27-2008, 09:35 PM
 
Location: Deep in the Heart of Texas
1,479 posts, read 7,035,136 times
Reputation: 1908
Quote:
Originally Posted by LindiJ View Post
...because I was afraid the only thing that would be different was that we just didn't go to work any more. I am a little bit of a loner and it is sometimes hard to come out of my shell if I have my comfort zone around me....I think the key is to give yourself new challenges. That can probably be done in your current community but you have to put yourself out there. I don't think it will come to you.
This has been an interesting thread!
I do agree with LindiJ and LauraC; it's more difficult to "reinvent" yourself as a retired person when you stay in the area that you've lived and worked in. I retired last summer and I spent a lot of time and effort figuring out how I could move on without moving. I knew I needed to meet new people and try new things and I did. It's worked out very well for me, but the first few months were a challenge. We will relocate next year, when my husband retires, and then I'll get to do it all over again!
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Old 04-27-2008, 10:04 PM
 
Location: Northern California
23 posts, read 57,658 times
Reputation: 24
I retired in 2004 from a police department in California and immediately went to work full time for a sheriff's office. I will retire from there next summer after five years at age 56. Although (officially) a retiree, I haven't had the freedom retirees usually have to do what I want since I am still working, but I am sure doing a lot thinking and planning.

I -have- experienced some of the observations others here have mentioned and am looking forward to total freedom to do what I want. Hopefully I will meet some of you along the way..
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