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Old 04-28-2008, 12:17 AM
 
48,516 posts, read 83,912,172 times
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I retired several years ago and now my wife retired also early. That has made a ton of difference.Depending on if both worked like us;you will find the scheduling problem is gone and you have the time to enjoy more things.Also you will notice that working really cost quite alot especaily if it meant eating out for tweo at lunch and often dinner. It is nice to not eat out so much for us.The freedom of time is the big difference.
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Old 04-28-2008, 12:47 AM
 
13,318 posts, read 25,554,182 times
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It makes sense to be somewhat at sea with retirement, but glad to not be going to work. I imagine that's quite common. Of course, if one is accustomed to going to work, it's odd not to. I have been pushing myself down the highway 40 hours a week for a long time. I'm sure I'll be very happy not to stay up all night and go to work and all, but it has formed my schedule for a long time. I also feel I'll have to do nothing for as long as I feel like to learn how to be self-motivated instead of "gotta go to work." I will not miss work.
I find many of my peers are obsessed with their grandchildren (I'm 55) and I've never had or wanted kids and find the whole subject boring. Now, I'm single, so don't have the issue of a husband who is still working.
I look forward to the "problem" of not working. It can't come too soon, but I'm sure it's an adjustment, no matter what.
I do think, if one works in retirement, it's got to be a whole different thing- knowing you can walk out if need be, knowing that you don't have to work for the money. I might work per-diem or part time "in retirement," but will know I don't HAVE to. It's a huge difference, I think.
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Old 05-06-2008, 04:42 PM
 
Location: Long Beach, CA
72 posts, read 176,118 times
Reputation: 28
Default Early retirement

I was forced into retirement early. Age 37. Work was my life because even when I was receiving a paycheck from somebody else, I've never worked for anyone other but myself.
I've found a new things to do - writing. Since I retired at an early age, I like trying to share my wisdom with everyone I come in contact with. I try to communicate with at least one new person a day. You seem very wise; I hope you do the same.
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Old 05-09-2008, 04:29 PM
 
Location: Lovelock, NV - Anchorage, AK
1,195 posts, read 4,993,294 times
Reputation: 465
with retiring at 37 I wonder if you experince the same joy as one who has worked for 30 years or more. I congratulate you for retiring young I'm not sure I would have been able to retire that young and appreciate it the same, I do like the idea of meeting a new person everyday.
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Old 05-10-2008, 05:56 PM
 
Location: home...finally, home .
8,235 posts, read 18,510,875 times
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Not to take anything away from you, rmarski, but , gee at 37, I had only really begun to work as a teacher (I started at 34). I can not imagine that I would feel the same relief and gratitude that my long working life was finally over.
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Old 09-20-2008, 10:01 AM
 
Location: LEAVING CD
22,952 posts, read 22,531,772 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lionhearted View Post
I was forced into retirement early. Age 37. Work was my life because even when I was receiving a paycheck from somebody else, I've never worked for anyone other but myself.
I've found a new things to do - writing. Since I retired at an early age, I like trying to share my wisdom with everyone I come in contact with. I try to communicate with at least one new person a day. You seem very wise; I hope you do the same.
I just looked for this thread when I got my first AARP letter in the mail the other day. Couldn't wrap my head around the fact I'm almost 50!
Like you I was forced due to injury to retire at 42 (7 years ago) and while I didn't miss work for the first couple of years I do now. I've noticed there are those that resent the fact that I'm retired even when I tell them I'd trade them good health and work for my retirement anytime. I think there is an age where retirement "feels" right and when you're below that age it just feels like you're doing something wrong or should be ashamed.
But after being out for 7 years I have learned that you have to stay busy doing something, the picture that's been painted in the media of retired people just sitting around smelling the flowers and basking in the sunshine is just not realistic unless you want your mental state to decline. You have to keep your brain busy, use it or lose it I guess. The hard part is while I can't work like I used to if I work at all I run a big risk of losing all income, even if I volunteer for a couple of hours a day/week.
Now that I've wasted the last 7 years IMO, I think it's time to go back to school for something, anything to keep the grey matter excersized and flowing.
The one big,big plus is that it's given me the chance to be home with my son since 5th grade and be very active in his schooling etc. Thankfully we've been able to afford to have my wife home most of the time as well until the economy killed that a few years ago so I guess all in all it's been an ok trade off. How many people get the chance to have both parents at home in the most critical times of their kids lives?
Oh well, enough rambling, now that I've found this thread I'll have to check in...
Back to regular programming!
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Old 09-20-2008, 07:48 PM
 
Location: Farmland side of the mountain
2,700 posts, read 3,311,594 times
Reputation: 9105
Smile This is amazing--

I have just found this thread this evening. Just by reading the posts on the current page, I can tell there is a ton of information ready at my fingertips. I plan on retiring in four months. Sometimes there's a smile inside and sometimes there's a bit of trepidation. I know that's probable quite normal, but I worry that I'm the one who won't get the 'right' paper signed, etc. I am referriing to carrying on with insurance coverage, etc.

I will make it a point to read all of the postings on this thread. Thanks to the op for starting the 'Retirement' group.
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Old 09-20-2008, 09:54 PM
 
Location: Prescott Valley,az summer/east valley Az winter
2,042 posts, read 3,627,365 times
Reputation: 7884
worked 20 years one job ~ then 22 years in another~ been retired 2!
never looked back never second guessed! Love every bit of retirement~ and keep as busy as I care to be!
Have kept up with freinds I had while working~ but live more time away than close~ am what is called Snowbird! Never miss working and think I made correct choice! Spend a portion of each year visiting places I've always wanted to but never had the time! We do live in a beautiful country and want to spend more time exploring it! Most of my freinds are also retireds~ from all over the continent!
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Old 09-21-2008, 07:09 AM
 
Location: Midwest transplant
2,013 posts, read 4,994,138 times
Reputation: 1570
What a great post! I'm looking forward to retirement for many of the above reasons. I've been teaching for 30 years, so I'll have a decent pension (I could get more if I worked more years, but why?) I can still return to my job as a sub, which will be a nice transition to stay in touch with the great friends and people I've worked with, but it will be on my availability. I too want to be able to finish a book or a project, visit a park, museum or attend a lecture/cultural event, eat lunch at a normal speed, get the first appointment of the day, hit the gym, grocery store, or market early in the day, and stay up late if there's a reason. To be able to take a trip when half the world isn't also on vacation, to not live for summers to have to complete all of my projects that require someone to be in the house, and to be able to experience the daylight hours from December to March.
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Old 09-21-2008, 09:48 AM
 
224 posts, read 861,922 times
Reputation: 151
I retired after 29 years as a teacher in 1996. I was 52, and I have never regretted it one bit.

I love being retired here in so Cal. Once you are retired for a couple years, you will learn that just wasting time doing absolutely nothing...maybe even for days at a time is cool.

I just received my Medicare card, so my Blue Cross drops significantly, and no more co-pays.
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