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Old 10-20-2018, 01:20 PM
 
Location: Eureka CA
8,249 posts, read 11,110,384 times
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Google "invisible disabilities". You may learn something.
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Old 10-20-2018, 01:42 PM
 
Location: NJ
10,680 posts, read 21,348,205 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eureka1 View Post
Google "invisible disabilities". You may learn something.
If you're talking to me I don't need to. My daughter has enough of them, so does my grandson and myself. None of us are working out in a gym. What invisible disability would allow a person to work out but not walk far?
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Old 10-20-2018, 02:20 PM
 
Location: interior Alaska
4,478 posts, read 3,315,783 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Roselvr View Post
If you're talking to me I don't need to. My daughter has enough of them, so does my grandson and myself. None of us are working out in a gym. What invisible disability would allow a person to work out but not walk far?
Something where the symptoms are intermittent is the first thing that comes to mind. Or something like agoraphobia. If they weren't the one driving, visual impairment. Someone with respiratory issues might well be able to lift or do yoga even if their cardio is limited.
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Old 10-20-2018, 02:42 PM
 
5,426 posts, read 3,446,805 times
Reputation: 13704
Quote:
Originally Posted by Roselvr View Post

If you're talking to me I don't need to. My daughter has enough of them, so does my grandson and myself. None of us are working out in a gym. What invisible disability would allow a person to work out but not walk far?
With severe arthritis (osteoarthritis), one could and can work out at a gym, but not be able to walk far at all in everyday life.

(don't worry, some people don't have a car, have never had a car, and many do not and have never had a placard or plates)
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Old 10-20-2018, 09:39 PM
 
2,633 posts, read 3,373,763 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Roselvr View Post
Like what? They can work out but not walk?
Well....yes!

My father was hit by a car 10 years ago while he was walking across the street. Broke his spine and legs and now he has a spinal cord injury and is paraplegic. He uses a wheelchair some, but he can also ambulate (they don't call it walking.... per se) with crutches and braces on both legs.

But he loves working out in the gym. Surprising to many, his strong upper body and determination helps him get from machine to machine, use the weights etc... He has often gone to the gym in his wheelchair, then rolls up to the machine/table etc... and transfers onto the machine to exercise. It's amazing what you can do with a strong upper body alone. Even with a weak upper body, there's a lot you can do...

Unfortunately, most of the gyms convenient for him have terrible parking, with no handicapped spaces and many outside dangers. Getting into the gym is the hardest part.

High curbs, uneven sidewalks, steep ramps, steps without railings, lazy businesses that don't shovel or salt their sidewalks well, and lazy businesses that don't remove water rapidly from slippery floors.... there are so many risks that the average able body person is able to ignore.
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Old 10-21-2018, 05:59 AM
 
Location: NJ
10,680 posts, read 21,348,205 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sfcambridge View Post
Well....yes!

My father was hit by a car 10 years ago while he was walking across the street. Broke his spine and legs and now he has a spinal cord injury and is paraplegic. He uses a wheelchair some, but he can also ambulate (they don't call it walking.... per se) with crutches and braces on both legs.

But he loves working out in the gym. Surprising to many, his strong upper body and determination helps him get from machine to machine, use the weights etc... He has often gone to the gym in his wheelchair, then rolls up to the machine/table etc... and transfers onto the machine to exercise. It's amazing what you can do with a strong upper body alone. Even with a weak upper body, there's a lot you can do...

Unfortunately, most of the gyms convenient for him have terrible parking, with no handicapped spaces and many outside dangers. Getting into the gym is the hardest part.

High curbs, uneven sidewalks, steep ramps, steps without railings, lazy businesses that don't shovel or salt their sidewalks well, and lazy businesses that don't remove water rapidly from slippery floors.... there are so many risks that the average able body person is able to ignore.
Everyone can see your dad is disabled and needs a handicapped spot. I was asking about people that can actually walk into a gym to work out.
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Old 10-21-2018, 08:25 AM
 
553 posts, read 401,489 times
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Originally Posted by Clemencia53 View Post
fyi - I rarely use the disabled parking. I qualify for DV plates so since that means I only have to pay 3 dollars a year to register my car - how can I pass up a deal like that!

My sibling has a hang tag and she does need it. She carries it with her so we use it if she is with us in one of our vehicles.
I work on a military installation, and start work at 6:30am. Every morning by 6:15, ALL of the handicapped spaces are filled with DV plates. Sadly, I know with absolute certainty that the vast majority of these people are fully capable of walking the extra 20 yards to a whole empty parking lot that time of day. I don't have any problem at all with somebody accepting the discount on the registration and taking the DV plate, but I absolutely feel like use of the handicapped space should require a placard or handicapped plate. The abuse is rampant.
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Old 10-21-2018, 09:08 AM
 
Location: northern New England
2,444 posts, read 1,062,526 times
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I can't imagine being self-righteous enough to go looking for seemingly able-bodied people using HP parking spots. Get a life, geesh.



Same with when I help someone out to their car with food from the food shelf, I am not mentally assessing the $$ value of their car and judging them. Life is too short. Go do something good.
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Old 10-21-2018, 09:23 AM
 
Location: FL
747 posts, read 1,578,439 times
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We have an ongoing "Stand your ground" case here in Florida over a handicap parking spot. A woman and a man parked in a handicap spot and another man confronted the woman driver over the illegal parking while the husband was in the store. When the man came out of the store and saw the man confronting his wife, he went over to the man and pushed him to the ground. The complainant pulled out his pistol and shot the woman's husband! They have since charged the man for first degree murder as he was the aggressor in this instance. They have not started the trial as yet.

I would not confront anyone over these parking spots. I would just ignore them and give them pity for being a moron.

I have a TAG and as yet to have anyone challenge me. I can walk, but I do not have full use of my left leg. I have to position it with my arms to get in and out of the vehicle. I have often given up my handicap spot for wheel chair vans or more severely handicapped than I.
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Old 10-21-2018, 01:08 PM
 
2,575 posts, read 4,689,485 times
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I can't fathom using the hang tag when the disabled person is not with you. My best friend has one because her 93-year-old mother lives with them and uses a wheelchair at home; my friend pushes her in a folding rolling chair they keep in her car trunk when they go out. Using the disabled spot allows her to not have to push so far, as well as being located closer to the curb ramps, which are usually near those spots.

I have been out with my friend in her car many times and she NEVER uses that hang tag unless her mom is with us! And I know her well enough (friends over 60 years now) to know she isn't just doing it because I'm with her.

People can really suck.
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