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Old 10-23-2018, 04:25 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cremebrulee View Post
There are many older folks who want to downsize and get rid of the work that goes with their homes.
There are also older folks who do not want to go into an independent living home.

there are many older retired folks who would be so happy renting an apartment, however, there are a few things that apartments do not do and that is to consider mildly handicapped persons of which I'm rather surprised at.

Why not put stall showers in apartments and move up in the world, by getting rid of the older low toilets, and install the high rise toilets? They are not more expensive, for sure....

Our country wants to be so diverse and says it takes pride in doing so, well from time to time, accidents happen and a person needs to have a first floor apartment with a stall shower at least?

I'm wondering why more apartment complexes do not cater to older people? Not rest homes, but there are older folks who would prefer an apartment.
Most apartment buildings are independently owned and operated. You would have to engage management about these concerns. There are no laws requiring such amenities. Otherwise, choose apartments that were specifically built for seniors. Your random poll among the ladies at work doesn't mean anything.
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Old 10-23-2018, 07:11 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Over the hill gang View Post
When my husband's mom retired she sold her home and moved into an Apt. She HATED it, it was too much noise for her so she bought a MH in a retirement park and was happy as a lark till she had to leave due to Alzheimer's.

My husband and I sold our home moved to a retirement community with MH's. It's like a regular neighborhood with nice yard etc.. Anyway we put a taller toilet in one bathroom and I avoid using that one, it's too tall for me. My husband put it in because of my back and knees. They do sell things you can use instead of installing a new toilet. You can get them with or without arms.
https://www.walgreens.com/store/c/no...393727-product

I know you can't have this in an apt you rent but...
We have a shower in one bathroom and tub in the other. If I were to get in a regular tub I couldn't get out (back and knees) My husband and I are going to Lowe's and buy a walk in tub in the near future and pay for the install. That is MUCH cheaper than buying one at the walk in tub companies. I also don't want or need all the bells and whistles like lights and jets. I just want the tub.
https://www.lowes.com/pd/ARIEL-53-5-...ded/1000230411

I've found quite a few things that make my life easier like buying a grabber so I don't have to bend over to pick up something from the ground or floor, also found a long handled dustpan that I love.

I do agree that there should be more senior apt's with those options.
I am onboard with all these things you have suggested, and have looked into them. I'm selling my home, b/c it is becoming a chore to take care of any more causing me more pain and headaches, along with stress...

and yes, there should by far, more apartments focused on all walks of life, not just young people. I believe keeping people segregated by age is wrong...being around younger people would help keep the mind more active and alert, which is important. I also believe that younger people need to be more respectful and aware of older folks...some are, some are not...yes, some would avoid older people but some would not...you could learn so much from older folks, just by listening and applying their suggestions to your life..also, your concern just to want to sit with them and talk with them, would also be rewarding for them.

As I suggested, I bet, if apartment complexes would keep the active older person in mind and their needs, you'd have less need for independent living....with just a few minor changes...like mentioned in the original post.
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Old 10-23-2018, 07:14 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nobodysbusiness View Post
OP: You are assuming most general builders care about people - that would be incorrect.

When there are projects with low-income housing built, those projects should try to accommodate handicapped people on the first floor - but those apartments might cost more than "regular" apartments on higher floors.
I'm not assuming anything, actually I know they don't care for older people, they care only about what is going to bring in the money....however, by modifying some of my suggestions, might bring in more of a happy clientel

The apartment I'm moving to for instance, has none of the above in my original post, but I've done research on the apartment complex, and talked with people who have lived there, who do live there, people who have left and more importantly have inquired with the local police about calls to that particular complex, which are very few.

So, that means an awful lot. Not one person I spoke with had anything negative to say about the community.
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Old 10-23-2018, 07:16 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by meo92953 View Post
My senior apartment in Minnesota had a walk in shower and no tub. How I missed baths!

My new apartment here in Arizona has a shower and tub. It is classified as a handicapped apartment and has grab bars throughout the bathroom, which is really nice. The tub also has a built-in seat which can be flipped down so a person can sit while showering. Very handy.
While baths may be the ticket for some, they are not for me, hate them and haven't taken a bath, in many years....hate the idea of sitting in a hot bath of bacteria....yikes A disease doctor once gave me suggestions after my knee replacements about bacteria and things we use in the shower, like scrubby things, wash clothes etc.
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Old 10-23-2018, 07:21 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by galaxyhi View Post
Im short, (5'6") and i prefer a high toilet. I have a "booster" for our low toilet at home.

A high toilet DOES cost more money as it takes more porcelain to build one.

I opted for the booster as it was one my mother used ( who had M S). She was much taller than i am. Since my shorter than me father doesn't use it, i asked for it.

If i cant get the handicapped stall i feel like im going to hit the floor lowering myself to a regular toilet!

Same when i visit my father. There are handrails attached to the wall by the toilet put tgere for mother. I cannot get up off his low toilet with out them and my cane.

Because of a bad back, hip and knee, i use a removable handrail attachment that attaches to the tub to get in and out. It helps tremendously and only cost $20. Since we will resell our house, i didnt want a shower stall, as a family with bathing age kids might not buy the house.

Ah the things we do for the masses, not the individual.

Ah. The pleasures of growing oldER.



lol, yeah, it's not fun, but there is always a way around things...and yes, most of the woman I work with, prefer the higher toilet...we've discussed this and honestly we don't know why companies, stores, apartments continue to use them. they are outdated, as far as the cost, when buying in bulk, they are cheaper and when they are on sale. I believe most younger store owners, builders, etc., don't even give it a thought, so perhaps we can all raise awareness by discussing this issue more.

It would be advantageous for everyone....especially in an apartment with two baths, one should be a stall shower...even if your younger, accidents happen, and not by choice, you may wish to have one in your home...there are so many people mid-age or older needing knee replacements from old injuries, and working out excessively, that again, it would prove a positive need. I know I have been happy for my one stall shower in one of my bathrooms.
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Old 10-23-2018, 07:24 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by marino760 View Post
Most general builders build to suit the average person, not seniors who need to have a high seat. Most people I dare say would not want a specialized toilet seat when there is no need for one. If you're not used to sitting on one, it's awkward and not the most comfortable. Personally, I avoid them.
Well, that's your thoughts, as I said, we discussed this at work, and many women, of all ages, preferred the higher seat,. and from time to time, I've seen people on crutches, or with walkers, who are working but handicapped, and they'd much prefer higher seats....

Some day you may have a need for one...I hope not, it's all in what your used to.

And by the way, when ever "I" go into a ladies room, it is always the handicapped higher toilet seat that is being used, and we have one in each and ever ladies room. So.....that one is used so much more than the others...so it's not just the older folks.

And btw, someday you'll be old, which is what scares young people, they hate the thought, but the wise ones do think of older folks, and they should be thought of, they are still paying taxes and contributing in some ways....even if only conversation...
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Old 10-23-2018, 07:33 AM
 
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[quote]
Quote:
Originally Posted by NoMoreSnowForMe View Post
First world problems.

I have lived in senior low-income housing for about the last 5 years, in 3 different apartment buildings. I'm SO glad that they have all had bathtubs. I don't take baths anymore, but I love having a tub for washing my dog, for using as a place to repot plants, wash large objects, etc. I use it as a utility washtub. I can also hang handwashed items to dry inside it, on an additional shower curtain rod I can put across the middle of it.
totally get is, however, if there is a two bath apartment, then put a stall shower in one of them....

Quote:
I'm not sure I've ever encountered a high toilet seat, and I don't need one, and wouldn't want one. I want my feet to touch the ground, and I'm not super tall.
your feet will still touch the ground, it isn't like sitting in a high chair, the purpose of them is so that it is easier pushing up and off of them.

Quote:
Anyone who is handicapped in the U.S. can install any needed modifications at their own cost, and landlords have to allow them to do it, if they're disabled. Some already have disabled bathrooms. If it's a reasonable accommodation for a disability, the landlord may even have to foot the bill.
I am not legally considered disabled, however, I have severe joint problems which are getting worse, so...I do not chose an independent living space, but do chose an apartment..basically I'm trying to bring awareness to the public of some minor changes and needs of society....

Quote:
But, not everyone wants to live in a handicap-modified unit. And, as I say, if anyone needs one - there are laws in place to get what you need.
that's right and where did I say every apartment needs to be for the handicapped. Listen, to put handrails in a tub shower is wise, I dont' care how old you are, young or old, you might slip...it a precaution....
and I also said, if you have two bathrooms, then put a stall shower in one of them, as far as the toilet, yes, you can always switch it out...or buy a riser for the toilet....as I said, I don't believe anyone thinks about these things until your older and in need of them.


Quote:
I just think there surely must be bigger problems to deal with in this first world country of ours - especially, since there are already protections in place for anyone who needs special accommodations.
yes, well there sure are, but for way too long society forgets about the needs of it's older people, let alone respecting their needs. This isn't a big deal....just thought I'd throw it out there
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Old 10-23-2018, 07:35 AM
 
26,366 posts, read 24,552,342 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by steiconi View Post
I'm renting an apartment near the Mayo Clinic. While not advertised as senior or disabled housing, the doorways are wide and the bathrooms big enough to maneuver a wheelchair. There's a stall shower in one bathroom.

But it has normal low toilets, no grab bars, and a shower/bathtub so deep, I have trouble stepping over the edge to shower.
Hence, my whole point....to design one bathroom out of two in an apartment, with a shower and one high rise toilet, and grab bars in both would be the ticket....
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Old 10-23-2018, 07:39 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BOS2IAD View Post
We sold the house and moved into an apartment building. Once we moved in, we were surprised to find so many other retirees here. Their stories were like ours---they sold the house and downsized to an apartment.

Our building is a few years old. Every apartment has high toilets that are water saving ones. Some apartments do have grab bars in the bathrooms. For example, we have two bathrooms. Oddly, the one that's not the master bath has a grab bar in the shower and one by the toilet. The master bath has both a shower stall and a tub. Personally, I would have preferred to just have the shower because the shower stall is cramped because the tub takes up a lot of room. OTOH, it's harder to fall down in such a small space.

They say that when Boomers are retiring, more and more are preferring to rent. With that in mind, IMO more apartment buildings/complexes should have senior friendly bathrooms
Well, yes, your right Boomers as myself do prefer to retire and get rid of the yard work, as well as downsize, but, to, apartments are in high demand...lets face it....whenever I lived in an apartment, there was much more money to be had, didn't have all the preventative maintenance, painting, repairs, etc...not to mention taxes, home insurance, plumbing, replacing appliances, etc. Lets face it, they no longer build things to last more than 7 - 12 years....so?

For me, it's an apartment....I'm ready...owned another home when I was younger and it seemed a great idea, however, I could do a lot of the work myself, now, not so much. Hands down for me it's an apartment
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Old 10-23-2018, 07:44 AM
 
26,366 posts, read 24,552,342 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by charlygal View Post
Most apartment buildings are independently owned and operated. You would have to engage management about these concerns. There are no laws requiring such amenities. Otherwise, choose apartments that were specifically built for seniors. Your random poll among the ladies at work doesn't mean anything.
Well, maybe my poll at work means nothing to you, but talk with those ladies who use those toilets....

This is only a discussion, you can certainly put down your feelings, but there are seniors who are in their 70's and 80's who are still very active...and do not want to live in senior housing....so.....remember this when your 70 and possibly with joint problems....

It's time this country consider it's own...and the needs of others regardless of age...I can promise you this...if more developers would consider this, they'd be wise.

I do know a lot of people who build homes, with a downstairs bedroom and bath & laundry room on the first floor, and the other bedrooms and baths upstairs so....that is a very wise thought for home owners.

When I reached 50 I was very pleased to have a home all on one floor, and not have to go steps....

Not suggesting that everyone feels like me, but an awful lot of boomers do.

And btw, this didn't just arise b/c I'm now older, I remembered my parents and grandparents talking about how this country needs to do more for the older generations who were here before you, as far as prescription costs, taking care of our veterans, and the acknowledgement of cuts for older people as far as taxes...they've contributed and paid their dues.

It is a consideration that most do not consider until they're older....themselves....treating older people as if they are invisible won't stop the aging process...we are all a part of this community....

Last edited by cremebrulee; 10-23-2018 at 08:51 AM..
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