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Old 10-23-2018, 07:48 AM
 
Location: Cochise county, AZ
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For me, as a single older woman, an apartment helps me feel safer. Knowing there are people around if I may need help makes me feel more secure.
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Old 10-23-2018, 12:45 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by meo92953 View Post
For me, as a single older woman, an apartment helps me feel safer. Knowing there are people around if I may need help makes me feel more secure.
and we should all look out for each other and I bet there are people who are young that do....why? Because they were brought up in a close knit family loved by all, young and old.
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Old 10-23-2018, 04:27 PM
 
Location: VT; previously MD & NJ
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Quote:
And by the way, when ever "I" go into a ladies room, it is always the handicapped higher toilet seat that is being used, and we have one in each and ever ladies room. So.....that one is used so much more than the others...so it's not just the older folks.
There are other reasons why the handicapped stall is preferred by many:

1) there is actually room to turn around without rubbing up against the walls

2) they are generally cleaner because in most cases they are the least used. I read once that the most used stall is the 2nd one from the door. The middle stalls are used the next most. The handicapped stalls are used the least because most of us have been taught to leave them accessible for people who actually are handicapped.
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Old 10-23-2018, 07:13 PM
 
Location: Fort Lauderdale, Florida
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Having my mobility is the most important indicator of my health to me.

The thought of not being able to get in and out of a shower or sit on a regular toilet is very scary to me.

Simple Sitting Test Predicts How Long You'll Live | DiscoverMagazine.com

The sit test.
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Old 10-23-2018, 07:34 PM
 
Location: Ohio
19,924 posts, read 14,242,533 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cremebrulee View Post
I'm wondering why more apartment complexes do not cater to older people? Not rest homes, but there are older folks who would prefer an apartment.
Because in the past, there weren't a lot of older people living in apartments.

My grandparents retired to Florida and built a house. About 15 years later they sold it and move back to Cincinnati to live with their son. When they returned to Florida in the 1990s, there was something there that wasn't there before, and that was lots and lots of retirement communities with apartments catering to the elderly, with lots of conveniences both in the kitchen and bathroom for the elderly.

They are out there, and their number will grow over time as the Boomer's retire.

Landlords who own small units, like 4 to 24 units in the building, are not going to spend the money to upgrade 1st floor units for the elderly, because it's not cost effective, and because Demand is sufficient so that those apartments are always rented by younger people.

You're going to need to find larger complexes, in excess of 80 units that cater to the elderly if you want those conveniences.

The first time I went to college, I shared an apartment with a couple of guys, and one thing we did to get free rent was refinish wood floors for the landlord. We got the landlord to agree to knock off our rent if we gave him receipts for the cost of refinishing the wood floors in our apartment. He was so impressed he asked us if we would refinish the floors in his other properties, and he owned a few dozen, so that was that.

There's nothing that bars you from asking your landlord for the same. Offer to replace the toilet and install a new shower, in exchange for reducing the rent equal to the cost of the upgrades.

If the landlord doesn't agree, ask anyway if you can replace those at your own expense. The landlord may or may not agree to it.

You should probably ask about that before you sign the lease.
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Old 10-24-2018, 06:17 AM
 
26,357 posts, read 24,524,583 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mircea View Post
Because in the past, there weren't a lot of older people living in apartments.

My grandparents retired to Florida and built a house. About 15 years later they sold it and move back to Cincinnati to live with their son. When they returned to Florida in the 1990s, there was something there that wasn't there before, and that was lots and lots of retirement communities with apartments catering to the elderly, with lots of conveniences both in the kitchen and bathroom for the elderly.

They are out there, and their number will grow over time as the Boomer's retire.

Landlords who own small units, like 4 to 24 units in the building, are not going to spend the money to upgrade 1st floor units for the elderly, because it's not cost effective, and because Demand is sufficient so that those apartments are always rented by younger people.

You're going to need to find larger complexes, in excess of 80 units that cater to the elderly if you want those conveniences.

The first time I went to college, I shared an apartment with a couple of guys, and one thing we did to get free rent was refinish wood floors for the landlord. We got the landlord to agree to knock off our rent if we gave him receipts for the cost of refinishing the wood floors in our apartment. He was so impressed he asked us if we would refinish the floors in his other properties, and he owned a few dozen, so that was that.

There's nothing that bars you from asking your landlord for the same. Offer to replace the toilet and install a new shower, in exchange for reducing the rent equal to the cost of the upgrades.

If the landlord doesn't agree, ask anyway if you can replace those at your own expense. The landlord may or may not agree to it.

You should probably ask about that before you sign the lease.
Thank you, I had my heart set on one apartment in particular, a large complex, and I hear everyone loves it there, very quiet...but found another newer one which does do one bathroom with a stall shower. So, I may switch to that one...? I've got time yet, and there are a lot of newer apartment complexes going in.

I just think with all the boomers out there, designers, builders and owners of apartments, would consider designing a few, not every one, but a few on the first floor with the boomers in mind. I don't consider myself old yet, however, do have aches and pains...and sometimes depending on weather and other issues, it is worse than other times...but I'm not yet ready for the glue factory. LOL

I'm basically trying to raise awareness for down the road, I know in my youth, I surely didn't give handicapped or older folks a thought.

I know of many people who downsized, sold their homes and rented...and they love it....

As I suggested before, there are builders in our areas, who are now putting up homes with everything downstairs, and a few bedrooms and baths upstairs, which is a great idea, for those who want homes and do not wish to go the steps any longer.
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Old 10-25-2018, 07:41 PM
 
Location: Ohio
19,924 posts, read 14,242,533 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by meo92953 View Post
For me, as a single older woman, an apartment helps me feel safer. Knowing there are people around if I may need help makes me feel more secure.
That's great.

Perhaps you can develop some friendships. You don't have to do each other's hair or anything, but maybe you can car-pool for grocery and other shopping. Sometimes it's a lot more fun that way.

While it's quite personal in nature, you might want to mention to others in passing of any medical conditions. My next-door neighbor is an elderly man, and he mentioned several medical conditions, so if I don't see him for a couple of days, I often find an excuse to knock on his door to see if he's okay. If I'm going to the market, I'll sometimes pick up a few items he requests.

Quote:
Originally Posted by cremebrulee View Post
I just think with all the boomers out there, designers, builders and owners of apartments, would consider designing a few, not every one, but a few on the first floor with the boomers in mind.
It will happen, albeit slowly. The neighborhood itself affects the likelihood. The Clifton neighborhood in Cincinnati never will, but then they cater to students and those affiliated with the university in some way. But, the other neighborhoods, especially those that have traditionally had populations of elderly will make changes.

One neighborhood, Cheviot, actually a small town bordering Cincinnati, has always had about 1/3 of its population elderly and in fact, the three bus routes that service the area are there for the elderly. There are many 4-12 family apartment units that cater to the elderly, and over time, they'll upgrade with better accommodations.
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Old 10-25-2018, 07:45 PM
 
6,321 posts, read 5,061,406 times
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Originally Posted by ansible90 View Post
There are other reasons why the handicapped stall is preferred by many:

1) there is actually room to turn around without rubbing up against the walls

2) they are generally cleaner because in most cases they are the least used. I read once that the most used stall is the 2nd one from the door. The middle stalls are used the next most. The handicapped stalls are used the least because most of us have been taught to leave them accessible for people who actually are handicapped.
I always use the handicapped stall if available!!
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Old 10-25-2018, 09:32 PM
 
Location: Lakewood OH
21,697 posts, read 23,672,920 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cremebrulee View Post
I am onboard with all these things you have suggested, and have looked into them. I'm selling my home, b/c it is becoming a chore to take care of any more causing me more pain and headaches, along with stress...

and yes, there should by far, more apartments focused on all walks of life, not just young people. I believe keeping people segregated by age is wrong...being around younger people would help keep the mind more active and alert, which is important. I also believe that younger people need to be more respectful and aware of older folks...some are, some are not...yes, some would avoid older people but some would not...you could learn so much from older folks, just by listening and applying their suggestions to your life..also, your concern just to want to sit with them and talk with them, would also be rewarding for them.

As I suggested, I bet, if apartment complexes would keep the active older person in mind and their needs, you'd have less need for independent living....with just a few minor changes...like mentioned in the original post.
Nobody is keeping anyone from doing anything. People choose to live in independent housing, they don't have to they want to. Independent senior living is active senior living. These "segregated" places usually have activities for the seniors who live in them. That's what keeps seniors' minds alert, not watching younger neighbors go about their business.In regular apartment complexes, if people socialize at all, like usually goes with like. As a life long apartment dweller, I've seen this social dynamic over and over again.

I for one prefer my independent living complex to a regular rental apartment building as do my neighbors. If I want to mingle with young people I have lots of opportunity outside my apartment complex. Why do I have to live in the same apartment complex as all my young friends?

Landlords rent to people who can afford their prices. They include the amenities most renters want. There are things renters can install for themselves with the landlord's permission. One thing they don't have to worry about in some places, new apartment complexes built in the last ten years or so in Portland, Or must have safety bars in the bathroom. Many newer built apartments offer walk-in showers. This is for the safety of everyone, not just seniors.
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Old 10-26-2018, 05:45 AM
 
26,357 posts, read 24,524,583 times
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Originally Posted by Minervah View Post
Nobody is keeping anyone from doing anything. People choose to live in independent housing, they don't have to they want to. Independent senior living is active senior living. These "segregated" places usually have activities for the seniors who live in them. That's what keeps seniors' minds alert, not watching younger neighbors go about their business.In regular apartment complexes, if people socialize at all, like usually goes with like. As a life long apartment dweller, I've seen this social dynamic over and over again.

I for one prefer my independent living complex to a regular rental apartment building as do my neighbors. If I want to mingle with young people I have lots of opportunity outside my apartment complex. Why do I have to live in the same apartment complex as all my young friends?

Landlords rent to people who can afford their prices. They include the amenities most renters want. There are things renters can install for themselves with the landlord's permission. One thing they don't have to worry about in some places, new apartment complexes built in the last ten years or so in Portland, Or must have safety bars in the bathroom. Many newer built apartments offer walk-in showers. This is for the safety of everyone, not just seniors.
I know all this, what I'm saying is, we are living much longer, and we''re much younger at heart...older people want to live as independently as they can for as long as they can...what I'm saying is, if it's my choice to live with older or younger people isn't the issue...that's a given...you rent an apartment, your going to have neighbors of all ages.

I did find an apartment thats attractive in that, they have two and 3 bedroom apartments with 2 baths, one bath has a stall shower in it...which is the ticket for me....

Its not just older people any longer with joint problems...you start having joint problems in your 50's if you've worked hard all your life, played sports and worked construction, lifted and work out...it's a given...(AND I"M NOT SAYING EVERYONE DOES) however a lot of people do...so why not put in bars in the bathtubs, why not install a stall shower and why not a high toilet???? It's not just older people who need these things, there are a lot of handicapped people who would love to be independent and could be, if showers were wheel chair accessible.

Not everyone feels and thinks like you do and not everyone feels and thinks like I do, there are exceptions to the rules...I for one, love younger people, and talking with them...

I'm just saying that there are an awful lot of boomers going to be retiring and apartments are in high demand, b/c boomer are fed up with the high prices of remodeling, hiring someone to take care of their yards, paying taxes, and all the repairs that go along with a house. Where I'm moving to, apartments are in such a high demand, they are building two and three new ones each year.

In the area I live in now, they are in such high demand, they don't have enough, and I for one even with all the joint problems I have, am not ready to move into an independent living home...plus they are ungodly costly, I'm not ready to throw that money away and live in a 2 x 4 room with a bed....No Thank you!!!!

All I'm saying is, Builders and designers of apartments just need to re-think their designs just a little, that's all...and it doesn't have to be every apartment...but they should really have to have a few handicapped apartments...makes sense...
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