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Old 11-13-2018, 11:16 AM
 
26,345 posts, read 24,507,802 times
Reputation: 16017

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Quote:
Originally Posted by LauraC View Post
I moved from my second floor apartment to a ground level apartment.

You can buy a transfer bench (has suction cups for your tub/shower apartment bathroom. Some of the bench is outside of the tub. You sit on the bench outside of the tub while you lift your legs over the tub then you close the shower curtain and slide over. You probably want to have a hand held shower spray with a long cord and make sure the controls are on the hand held part. I wrap mine around the handle on the bench because the thing on the wall to hold it kept falling off. You will have a shower curtain with a liner. You cut the liner and slide it through the slats on the bench so the liner stays inside the tub while you shower. Can't imagine it working with a sliding door shower/tub.

Make sure when the shower head is replaced, you save the old one. The maintenance man in my apartment complex installed mine for me because my tall male therapist had a hard time getting the old shower head off but typically any person that can reach it can get it off and replace it. But when you leave the apartment for good, they are going to want to put the old shower head back on.

Here is a photo of one of the benches I described:

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...d_i=8624344011

To use one, you must be able to lift your leg over the side of the tub while you are in a seated position. High tub sides would make it hard to do.

A standard sized toilet should be okay if you are short. If you have trouble standing up and typically push your self up using arm rests when you sit in any chair in a home or office, one of these (link below) can be placed around your apartment toilet because no holes in the wall or cabinet are needed:

https://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_s...d=M2G0VRQEQTKG

I have a different bathroom for guests. That helps, too.

Newer apartments are required (pretty sure it's not just a state requirement) to have large door openings for rooms and outside entrances that can accommodate wheelchairs so you should look for that when apartment hunting in case one day you need it for wheelchair, scooter or rollator. Don't think that will be a problem in any apartment complex built after the early 1990s. You should also look at the size of the halls (if any) and how easy it would be to turn around using one of the above. Ditto the bathrooms.

I can only reach the bottom shelves of my overhead cabinets but that was true when I was short in my 20s, too. Then, however, I could stand on something and not worry about falling.

As far as stairs go, it won't just be a leg issue. It could be a dizziness or weakness issue. You are going to be holding onto the bannister with one hand and carrying things up and down with the other. One less hand to lug things may mean you have to make multiple trips up and down the stairs. Who needs that? We're talking about stairs inside and outside.

Another issue is where do you park? You may want to rent a garage in your apartment complex but are they as close to your apartment entrance compared to parking in a lot right outside of your apartment entrance? Think grocery lugging. I know, I know. You are thinking about snow but as a retiree, do you really have to go outside or can you wait until the sun melts most of it. Maybe the supermarkets deliver.

I know no one thinks about these things when they first retire. I certainly didn't.

I have a foldable lightweight shopping cart that you can push or pull. I use it to bring things between my car and my apartment.
Thank you so kindly for these hints.....greatly appreciate the time it took to write this up.

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Old 11-13-2018, 08:57 PM
 
Location: Verde Valley AZ
8,614 posts, read 9,676,241 times
Reputation: 10955
Quote:
Originally Posted by LauraC View Post
I moved from my second floor apartment to a ground level apartment.

You can buy a transfer bench (has suction cups for your tub/shower apartment bathroom. Some of the bench is outside of the tub. You sit on the bench outside of the tub while you lift your legs over the tub then you close the shower curtain and slide over. You probably want to have a hand held shower spray with a long cord and make sure the controls are on the hand held part. I wrap mine around the handle on the bench because the thing on the wall to hold it kept falling off. You will have a shower curtain with a liner. You cut the liner and slide it through the slats on the bench so the liner stays inside the tub while you shower. Can't imagine it working with a sliding door shower/tub.

Make sure when the shower head is replaced, you save the old one. The maintenance man in my apartment complex installed mine for me because my tall male therapist had a hard time getting the old shower head off but typically any person that can reach it can get it off and replace it. But when you leave the apartment for good, they are going to want to put the old shower head back on.

Here is a photo of one of the benches I described:

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...d_i=8624344011

To use one, you must be able to lift your leg over the side of the tub while you are in a seated position. High tub sides would make it hard to do.

A standard sized toilet should be okay if you are short. If you have trouble standing up and typically push your self up using arm rests when you sit in any chair in a home or office, one of these (link below) can be placed around your apartment toilet because no holes in the wall or cabinet are needed:

https://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_s...d=M2G0VRQEQTKG

I have a different bathroom for guests. That helps, too.

Newer apartments are required (pretty sure it's not just a state requirement) to have large door openings for rooms and outside entrances that can accommodate wheelchairs so you should look for that when apartment hunting in case one day you need it for wheelchair, scooter or rollator. Don't think that will be a problem in any apartment complex built after the early 1990s. You should also look at the size of the halls (if any) and how easy it would be to turn around using one of the above. Ditto the bathrooms.

I can only reach the bottom shelves of my overhead cabinets but that was true when I was short in my 20s, too. Then, however, I could stand on something and not worry about falling.

As far as stairs go, it won't just be a leg issue. It could be a dizziness or weakness issue. You are going to be holding onto the bannister with one hand and carrying things up and down with the other. One less hand to lug things may mean you have to make multiple trips up and down the stairs. Who needs that? We're talking about stairs inside and outside.

Another issue is where do you park? You may want to rent a garage in your apartment complex but are they as close to your apartment entrance compared to parking in a lot right outside of your apartment entrance? Think grocery lugging. I know, I know. You are thinking about snow but as a retiree, do you really have to go outside or can you wait until the sun melts most of it. Maybe the supermarkets deliver.

I know no one thinks about these things when they first retire. I certainly didn't.

I have a foldable lightweight shopping cart that you can push or pull. I use it to bring things between my car and my apartment.

I had a shower transfer bench last year when I broke my hip. It worked well but I didn't use it for long. I still have it, taking up room in the garage. Keeping it 'just in case'.


When I bought my house I wasn't exactly thinking ahead about wheel chairs and such. I learned, when I broke my hip, that I maybe should have! The house has a nice open floor plan so is easy to get around in either a wheelchair or using a walker. BUT the bedroom and bathroom doors are a no go for a wheelchair. And have to turn a walker sideways to go into a bathroom.


My dad built his last house in his 70s and, yep, a two story. It had three bedrooms, four bathrooms, kitchen, living and dining rooms, large laundry AND a glassed in front porch. Big house for two people and stairs that got harder and harder for my dad to use over the years. They ended up putting in a stair chair. It was great for 'carrying' things up and down stairs and kinda fun, if slow, to ride on. I asked Dad once why he would build such a house at his age and he just said, "Because I wanted to". Okay. lol


I have one of those shopping carts as well. I love that thing. Great for getting stuff IN and I use it to haul the trash OUT. I use it for all sorts of things like taking stuff to the storage shed, etc.. I thought about a little red wagon but opted for the cart instead.
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Old 11-14-2018, 05:30 AM
 
26,345 posts, read 24,507,802 times
Reputation: 16017
Quote:
Originally Posted by AZDesertBrat View Post
I had a shower transfer bench last year when I broke my hip. It worked well but I didn't use it for long. I still have it, taking up room in the garage. Keeping it 'just in case'.


When I bought my house I wasn't exactly thinking ahead about wheel chairs and such. I learned, when I broke my hip, that I maybe should have! The house has a nice open floor plan so is easy to get around in either a wheelchair or using a walker. BUT the bedroom and bathroom doors are a no go for a wheelchair. And have to turn a walker sideways to go into a bathroom.


My dad built his last house in his 70s and, yep, a two story. It had three bedrooms, four bathrooms, kitchen, living and dining rooms, large laundry AND a glassed in front porch. Big house for two people and stairs that got harder and harder for my dad to use over the years. They ended up putting in a stair chair. It was great for 'carrying' things up and down stairs and kinda fun, if slow, to ride on. I asked Dad once why he would build such a house at his age and he just said, "Because I wanted to". Okay. lol


I have one of those shopping carts as well. I love that thing. Great for getting stuff IN and I use it to haul the trash OUT. I use it for all sorts of things like taking stuff to the storage shed, etc.. I thought about a little red wagon but opted for the cart instead.
It is funny how when your young, you don't realize the things we take for granted, until you are made to realize it. But honestly, I believe the U.S. needs to start realizing the needs of older folks, regardless...b/c we want to remain independent as long as we can, and I'm just so surprised that apartments do not put in those very small extras that would make life so much more manageable and safer...

It might be wise if we all start discussing it...and alerting our kids about it...to think and plan ahead for those days when you might need it. Secure handrails are really a must in showers, as anyone can fall...and they say, most accidents happen in your own home. So, then, why not take pre-cautions...I mean it's not like your hurting anyone or disturbing anyone's pocket book by installing higher toilets, handrails in all showers and tub areas, wheel chair access, and if there are more than one bathroom, put in a stall shower with a seat...

Like I said, when I was young, never liked climbing stairs...love it when everything is on one floor, and the open floor plan is really nice...

You know, they make wheel chairs in different sizes? Did you know that? My mom broke her hip but, she was a tiny person...and I bought her a wheel chair.
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Old 11-15-2018, 10:19 PM
 
Location: Verde Valley AZ
8,614 posts, read 9,676,241 times
Reputation: 10955
Quote:
Originally Posted by cremebrulee View Post
It is funny how when your young, you don't realize the things we take for granted, until you are made to realize it. But honestly, I believe the U.S. needs to start realizing the needs of older folks, regardless...b/c we want to remain independent as long as we can, and I'm just so surprised that apartments do not put in those very small extras that would make life so much more manageable and safer...

It might be wise if we all start discussing it...and alerting our kids about it...to think and plan ahead for those days when you might need it. Secure handrails are really a must in showers, as anyone can fall...and they say, most accidents happen in your own home. So, then, why not take pre-cautions...I mean it's not like your hurting anyone or disturbing anyone's pocket book by installing higher toilets, handrails in all showers and tub areas, wheel chair access, and if there are more than one bathroom, put in a stall shower with a seat...

Like I said, when I was young, never liked climbing stairs...love it when everything is on one floor, and the open floor plan is really nice...

You know, they make wheel chairs in different sizes? Did you know that? My mom broke her hip but, she was a tiny person...and I bought her a wheel chair.

When I was doing in home health care I had several clients that lived in assisted living facilities and their bathrooms were, pretty much, what you described. Higher toilets, walk in showers w/seats, handrails AND an emergency cord. Personally the BEST shower I ever had was in the house before this one. My mom had it built just for her looking at the eventuality of having to use a wheelchair or walker to get into it. It was HUGE with a really nice big seat built into one end and rain shower head. I loved that thing! It was half the size of my bathroom now! lol Not as big as a gym shower but pretty big.


When I was MUCH younger I had dreams of living in a Victorian home, stairs and all. Well, over the years I decided 1) I didn't need a house that big, 2) don't want stairs and 3) don't want to have to clean a huge house! lol


Yes, I know there are different sizes of wheelchairs. I'm "tiny" too at 5' and 95 lbs. but the wheelchair I borrowed from my brother was regular size. He's a big guy. I didn't need it for very long but got pretty good at getting around with it.
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Old 11-16-2018, 08:54 AM
 
26,345 posts, read 24,507,802 times
Reputation: 16017
Quote:
Originally Posted by AZDesertBrat View Post
When I was doing in home health care I had several clients that lived in assisted living facilities and their bathrooms were, pretty much, what you described. Higher toilets, walk in showers w/seats, handrails AND an emergency cord. Personally the BEST shower I ever had was in the house before this one. My mom had it built just for her looking at the eventuality of having to use a wheelchair or walker to get into it. It was HUGE with a really nice big seat built into one end and rain shower head. I loved that thing! It was half the size of my bathroom now! lol Not as big as a gym shower but pretty big.


When I was MUCH younger I had dreams of living in a Victorian home, stairs and all. Well, over the years I decided 1) I didn't need a house that big, 2) don't want stairs and 3) don't want to have to clean a huge house! lol


Yes, I know there are different sizes of wheelchairs. I'm "tiny" too at 5' and 95 lbs. but the wheelchair I borrowed from my brother was regular size. He's a big guy. I didn't need it for very long but got pretty good at getting around with it.
yes, loved looking at Victorian homes as well, but that was it for me, just looking at them. My mother had a huge Victorian....well it was huge for me, but about medium size for a Victorian...steps all over the place...not my cup of tea....

My shower I have now is big....a big walk in, but needs to be updated...since I'm selling I'll let whoever buys it, update however they want....no more for me.
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