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Old 10-25-2018, 06:48 PM
 
Location: SoCal
6,077 posts, read 9,547,187 times
Reputation: 5839

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Quote:
Originally Posted by vicky3vicky View Post
. . .
Speaking for myself, maybe people were not "concerned" about my "differentness" 50 years ago, they just hated me for it, and they went out of their way to be sure they made my life a living hell. [and no, my family did not help. they were the worst!]Unfortunately, for many younger "creatively wired" young people, that is still the case. And that is why I am a hard-core Autism and Disabilities activist. . . .
I'm sorry you had to go through that. I was demonstrably "different". But it was a rare occasion that I was given any special consideration for it. OTOH, there was *no* bullying at my school, so I'm dismayed when I hear about it. Mine was a private school, and could more easily expel troublesome students, so that may at least partially explain the lack of bullying. I think more important, my parents and teachers modeled that my "difference" was simply a different personality and wasn't anything strange - only different. There were kids who teased, but it was never put-down teasing but rather get-a-reaction teasing. And it looks to me like most kids do that with each other.

Would I have wanted some intervention as a child? I'm undecided. I think growing up not feeling like such a weird outsider went a long way towards my living with - and even cherishing - my "difference". But my life may have been easier in some ways. For example, I could have retired making double the salary I did, but I turned down sideways transfers to more lucrative positions that required frequent interaction with co-workers because I would have been miserable in those positions.

If I were a kid nowadays (shudder!) I would quite possibly have been diagnosed as high-functioning autistic. Wrongly, I believe - I think my "difference" was probably something more like social anxiety disorder, maybe general anxiety, and possibly clinical depression.
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Old 10-25-2018, 06:55 PM
 
6,347 posts, read 5,081,974 times
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I was kind of shy when I was younger, but that changed as I grew up.

I got along with almost everyone. Guess I was sort of normal. Whatever that is.
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Old 10-25-2018, 06:55 PM
 
Location: Idaho
1,457 posts, read 1,159,750 times
Reputation: 5540
First, I agree with the OP's observation that there are more kids diagnosed with some kind of behavioral or personality disorder than when I was growing up as discussed in this paper:

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5240230/

Quote:
During the past 50 years, health insurance providers and national registers of mental health regularly report significant increases in the number of mental disorder diagnoses in children and adolescents. However, epidemiological studies show mixed effects of time trends of prevalence of mental disorders. Overdiagnosis in clinical practice rather than an actual increase is assumed to be the cause for this situation.
However, I think the opposite case of underdiagnosis and undertreatment can represent more serious problems than overmedication associated with overdiagnosis.

If anything, I think there is more societal acceptance of people who are different (LGBT, with ASD, with physical disabilities etc.) than when I was growing up. So I am in total agreement with Vicki.

Back to the OP's question "If you were a kid in today's world...what personality or behavioral "disorder" do you think you might be diagnosed with?", my answer would be 'smart aleck' which is the same label some grade school teachers gave me!

I am surprised to see that many posters think that it is terrible to be a kid today. Having had a lot of interaction with kids (as a volunteer in science fairs, engineering weeks, discovery camps, Young Eagle flights, and spending time with my nephews, nieces and friends' grand children), I think it's wonderful to be a kid in this day and age. We live in a highly technical world with rapid development, amazing discoveries and world wide information sharing. The world is their oysters for kids who are curious and love to learn (like most of the kids that I know).
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Old 10-25-2018, 06:59 PM
 
11,183 posts, read 8,575,060 times
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OP, are you mocking real disorders and those affected? No one is going around diagnosing people for fun and giggles. Have some respect for people who are truly dealing with real disorders.
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Old 10-25-2018, 07:23 PM
 
Location: Ohio
19,978 posts, read 14,268,565 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by katharsis View Post
. . . what personality or behavioral "disorder" do you think you might be diagnosed with?
None.

Quote:
Originally Posted by katharsis View Post
It seems to me that more and more young kids are diagnosed with some kind of personality or behavioral label, so it makes me wonder what label, if any, you might have been saddled with.
You are a product of your environment, and if your environment is dysfunctional, then you will be, too.

I had a high school friend over one day, and my mother invited him to stay for dinner. It was a Saturday, and my father was working any over-time shift, so when he got home we ate.

Later, my friend made some comment about my father not being drunk. I didn't get it, until much later when I found out this kid's father always hit Happy Hour after work and was a drunken verbally abusive jack-ass at the dinner table. That was probably the first time in a long time, perhaps even the first time in his life, when that kid sat at a dinner table with people who weren't intoxicated and had a normal fun dinner conversation.

Unfortunately, you don't get to pick your parents, and that's what some people live with.

As a child, you learn to cope with that the best way you know how, but regrettably, no one teaches you proper positive coping skills, so in developing your own ways, it sometimes leads to self-destructive behaviors.

It's not always the fathers. Sometimes it's mothers who are depressed, because they're in a marriage they don't really want to be in, or would rather be doing anything other than taking care of children, and it's difficult for children to deal with those situations.

If you've been coping since you were a child, then by the time you get to high school, you've been coping the wrong way for 10 years, and it doesn't get any better.

It takes a long time to learn how to undo that, and some people never do, and then, guess what, their children are now in a dysfunctional home learning all the wrong ways to cope.
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Old 10-25-2018, 07:46 PM
 
Location: Tennessee
23,684 posts, read 17,640,506 times
Reputation: 27767
Probably Asperger's.
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Old 10-25-2018, 08:23 PM
Status: "Watching America made small." (set 3 days ago)
 
Location: Ontario, Canada
25,903 posts, read 13,463,542 times
Reputation: 11709
If you were a kid in today's world . . .


I wouldn't have gotten the strap so many times.
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Old 10-25-2018, 08:33 PM
 
6,344 posts, read 3,596,178 times
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I was a total tomboy.

Gender Dysphoria?
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Old 10-25-2018, 09:49 PM
 
Location: Out there somewhere...a traveling man.
39,585 posts, read 47,836,774 times
Reputation: 110517
If you were a kid in today's world . . .

I would find a way to climb back into the womb and hibernate.
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Old 10-25-2018, 10:58 PM
 
6,673 posts, read 1,388,129 times
Reputation: 16753
Quote:
Originally Posted by charlygal View Post
OP, are you mocking real disorders and those affected? No one is going around diagnosing people for fun and giggles. Have some respect for people who are truly dealing with real disorders.
Never. Please see my previous post #16. I would hate to think that I was ever perceived as ever mocking anyone for anything they cannot help! (FYI, my brother had muscular dystrophy, so I am more sensitive about this than most people, I think.)

I am sincerely sorry if you or anyone misunderstood what I was saying.
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