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Old 10-26-2018, 04:21 AM
 
Location: NC Piedmont
3,916 posts, read 2,887,120 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by katharsis View Post
Never. Please see my previous post #16. I would hate to think that I was ever perceived as ever mocking anyone for anything they cannot help! (FYI, my brother had muscular dystrophy, so I am more sensitive about this than most people, I think.)

I am sincerely sorry if you or anyone misunderstood what I was saying.
Came across like a dog whistle to me. You didn't specifically mock but I inferred you didn't believe in a lot of the more recently classified conditions and were inviting others to share what they thought of them.
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Old 10-26-2018, 04:46 AM
 
Location: Central CT, sometimes NH.
3,493 posts, read 5,155,247 times
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I was a very active young boy who had a lot of imagination. I had a hard time sitting still and asked a lot of questions. I would not do well in school in today's test-driven environment and most likely would end up suspended for not being cooperative in doing what everyone else is instructed to do in the way modeled.

I also would not do well with an environment where the virtual world and social media is such an important focus. I climbed trees, built forts, customized bikes and took long adventures with my friends in the woods and on our bikes often riding 50 or more miles from home during summer vacations and on the weekends. We had jobs at age 10 and were very independent. Today's society does not afford those opportunities and parents would get arrested if they let their 10 and 11 year old kids venture off on a 50 mile bike trip and camp in the woods with their friends. Imagine we didn't even have a cell phone to call home if something went wrong. We had to preplan our own contingency plan.

I imagine that I'd be diagnosed with ADHD and put on meds to calm me down and fit in better with school expectations. However, I do believe that there are some environmental factors at play that are resulting in changes in many children's brain chemistry. That along with the changes in the way that children interact is connected to the growth in autism, ADHD, and especially anxiety and depression among the young. It is shameful that our country isn't more committed to finding what the contributing factors are and providing better support for those affected especially as it applies to learning environments, job training, and supportive housing once they reach adulthood. The food supply, the drug industry, technology companies, education and social services are all areas that are key areas that are likely to be affected and it doesn't seem like society is ready to acknowledge the connections or face the financial costs.

Last edited by Lincolnian; 10-26-2018 at 04:58 AM..
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Old 10-26-2018, 05:22 AM
 
6,703 posts, read 1,391,569 times
Reputation: 16800
Quote:
Originally Posted by ReachTheBeach View Post
Came across like a dog whistle to me. You didn't specifically mock but I inferred you didn't believe in a lot of the more recently classified conditions and were inviting others to share what they thought of them.
As I said, I would never mock anyone with a real condition, but I do believe that many kids are diagnosed with conditions that they really don't have. In other words, I think that many kids are wrongly diagnosed. I hope that clears things up, and I again, I am sorry that I wasn't more clear to begin with.

However, I do want to thank you, Vicky and charlygal pointing that out! I would much rather be given the chance to clarify and apologize for coming across like an "arse" than just have someone assume that I actually am an arse!

Btw, I was specifically thinking about ADHD, when I wrote my first post.

https://www.health.harvard.edu/blog/...-2017031611304
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Old 10-26-2018, 06:39 AM
 
11,191 posts, read 8,579,925 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ReachTheBeach View Post
Came across like a dog whistle to me. You didn't specifically mock but I inferred you didn't believe in a lot of the more recently classified conditions and were inviting others to share what they thought of them.
EXACTLY. If no one has a true disorder, then they wouldn't be diagnosed with anything.

To say that one was a tomboy as a child and today, they would get diagnosed as having gender dysmorphia is making light of people with real disorders.

You are saying none of this is real and it's all hocus pocus.
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Old 10-26-2018, 07:06 AM
 
6,703 posts, read 1,391,569 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by charlygal View Post
EXACTLY. If no one has a true disorder, then they wouldn't be diagnosed with anything.

To say that one was a tomboy as a child and today, they would get diagnosed as having gender dysmorphia is making light of people with real disorders.

You are saying none of this is real and it's all hocus pocus.
Please. I did not say that the fictional Jo March wold have gender dysmorphia, but that I think that s/he would possibly -- maybe even probably -- be evaluated for such. Again we are talking about a fictional character, but if such a personl existed in real life, and she was evaluated and found to be transgendered, I would have absolutely no problem with that and with her/him receiving whatever counseling or other treatment she desired (although I don't think that I would ever approve of the idea of sex change surgery on minors). But, again, when I wrote my first post, I was thinking of ADHD which is a very common (and I think overly diagnosed) condition, and I was not even thinking about relatively uncommon conditions.

Well, I think it is obvious that you do have some kind of problem in that you refuse to accept a sincere apology, and you are now one of only about a dozen or so people on my Ignore list.

I just think it is too bad and very sad that some people obviously try to find malicious intent where none of it is actually present. I am now going to stay away from this thread, but again, I do apologize for not being more clear.
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Old 10-26-2018, 10:03 AM
 
1,685 posts, read 585,570 times
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I'm on the fence about whether I would or wouldn't want to be growing up in today's world.

In certain respects it would be wonderful, because of the almost unlimited access to information (let's put it this way: If there wasn't anything new for me to read at the table during every meal, I would grab a random volume of the Encyclopedia and read that, lol). And I would love all the different technologies making so many things possible.

On the other hand, though, if the bullying I received during the 1960s were translated into today's social media setting, I don't know if I could have coped with it. I wouldn't have been a suicide statistic but the fear and trauma would be magnified probably tenfold. The stress would be unimaginable. At least back in the day I only had to deal with it in a single setting (only on school grounds, and for three years on the schoolbus because the high school was too far to walk) for 7 or 8 hours a day, five days a week. In today's world the online bullying is 24/7 and not just confined to a single geographic location. Cyberbullying is such a deadly cancer in a child/teen's world today.
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Old 10-26-2018, 10:18 AM
 
4,454 posts, read 2,630,575 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by katharsis View Post
. . . what personality or behavioral "disorder" do you think you might be diagnosed with?

It seems to me that more and more young kids are diagnosed with some kind of personality or behavioral label, so it makes me wonder what label, if any, you might have been saddled with.

With me, I think because I was so introverted and focused as a child, probably Social Anxiety Disorder and Depression, combined with possibly being put somewhere on the high-functioning Autism Spectrum.

You?


(Personally, though, I'm actually happy that people weren't so concerned with children being "different" 50 years ago!)
In tge 60s i was considered "active" and a "hyperactive
child".

I wouldn't sit still.

I couldn't pay attention to something that didnt actually hold my attention.

Nowadays id be on meds drugged up.

Then it was " go out and play ( burn off energy)" and " go downstairs ( to the basement) to play".

Eventually by my teens i calmed down, but dobt think my attention was better held. I had to REALLY pay attention in school to get what average grades i got.

I also didnt /don't like being in crowds. Causes anxiety disorder which i am diagnosed with as an adult. Im also now bipolar, was treated for years for depression onky till an astute psychiatrist spent 4.5 hours grilling me about my life. He Said "no, youre not depressed, youre bipolar!".

So i guess ADHD w/anxiety disorders and bipolar depression.

I dint know.

It could be a conspiracy to get us all to act like zombies!!!!

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Old 10-26-2018, 10:22 AM
 
1,685 posts, read 585,570 times
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I won't wade into the "labels then and now" discussion except to say that in my view, childrens behavior during the 1950s and 1960s was often described and handled in overly simplistic terms ("he's such a brat", "she's spoiled rotten", "he's terribly shy", "he's just slow") whereas IMHO nowadays the pendulum has swung in the opposite direction, with a clinical diagnosis for seemingly everything.

I do suspect that it's due in part to how the medical insurance landscape has changed. Back in the day the insurers would pretty much pay on a claim for anything as long as a doctor's office sent it in. Eventually that morphed into needing to make every single thing that's brought up in a doctor's office into a definable problem needing a specified solution. Sometimes it gets so ridiculous that it's tempting to resort to the old saw that is generally attributed to Freud (but who knows): "A cigar is sometimes just a cigar." And sometimes a chronically bratty child is just a chronically bratty child at a particular stage of their development, however long or short that stage might be.

This is not meant to denigrate anyone who has an emotional disorder. Rather, I feel its a reality check on the mindset that almost everything people may do which may be outside of some arbitrary norm requires a clinical diagnosis (label) and/or treatment. Our society has apparently gone from 'diagnosing almost nothing' to 'diagnosing almost everything.' IMHO that's not necessarily a good thing across the board.
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Old 10-26-2018, 10:35 AM
 
3,959 posts, read 3,272,898 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mircea View Post
None.



You are a product of your environment, and if your environment is dysfunctional, then you will be, too.

I had a high school friend over one day, and my mother invited him to stay for dinner. It was a Saturday, and my father was working any over-time shift, so when he got home we ate.

Later, my friend made some comment about my father not being drunk. I didn't get it, until much later when I found out this kid's father always hit Happy Hour after work and was a drunken verbally abusive jack-ass at the dinner table. That was probably the first time in a long time, perhaps even the first time in his life, when that kid sat at a dinner table with people who weren't intoxicated and had a normal fun dinner conversation.

Unfortunately, you don't get to pick your parents, and that's what some people live with.

As a child, you learn to cope with that the best way you know how, but regrettably, no one teaches you proper positive coping skills, so in developing your own ways, it sometimes leads to self-destructive behaviors.

It's not always the fathers. Sometimes it's mothers who are depressed, because they're in a marriage they don't really want to be in, or would rather be doing anything other than taking care of children, and it's difficult for children to deal with those situations.

If you've been coping since you were a child, then by the time you get to high school, you've been coping the wrong way for 10 years, and it doesn't get any better.

It takes a long time to learn how to undo that, and some people never do, and then, guess what, their children are now in a dysfunctional home learning all the wrong ways to cope.
Nail hit squarely on head!! I knew so many kids from my childhood who were trying to fit in, or get along, or worse, trying to become invisible--and failing that, be angrily in your face. There is no way to deal with a dysfunctional home life when no one, including teachers, your own siblings, or anyone in an authority position, knows what to do, or say to the troubled child. Usually it is a sense of low self esteem that serves as the troubled kid's lifetime award, "troublemaker," labeled and living it. Back in the day, teachers and most "authorities" were simply unable to relate to "the troubled kids?, so, toss them under the bus and call it a day..

That situation hasn't changed much in today's modern school setting. And Columbine and other school violence events hasn't really altered the course much for those severely troubled minds. Yeah, kids today may be getting different labels put on them, but yes, we should be looking for clues to the source of behavior problems at the earliest possible opportunity. Unfortunately, school is the net that captures all children and expects them to conform, and that, by itself, is a pressure cooker in the making. The irony in all of this lies in the notion we have about individualism, on the one hand we say we cherish it, but on the other, most want social conformity in our schools.
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Old 10-26-2018, 01:14 PM
 
Location: Floyd Co, VA
3,416 posts, read 5,147,188 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by davebarnes View Post
Is being a smart aleck a disorder?

Nah, I think it's most likely a sign of a healthy mind, able to think beyond what the grown ups tell you.

But if you want maybe an exception could be made in your case.
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