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Old 02-05-2019, 10:33 AM
 
1,696 posts, read 610,929 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NewbieHere View Post
I worry about Dengue Fever, Iíve been researching my trip to Japan and Southeast Asia, your comment scares me. Is there anything we can do before our trip to prevent this.

It is transmitted by a type of mosquito. The bite is very tiny with minimal itch. For prevention, rub a DEET-containing lotion (buy several bottles cheaply at any 7 Eleven in Bangkok) all over the exposed areas (particularly ankles or over areas with prominent veins), avoid brackish water, don't use any scented cosmetics, don't hang around incense-burning areas of temples (mosquitos are attracted to scents), apply extra DEET at dusk. Sleep in strongly air-conditioned places. I was bitten twice while spending a month in SE Asia, both times when I was in temple courtyards, but did not get dengue fever. The risk is there, but is not tremendously high. There is no vaccine or treatment.
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Old 02-05-2019, 11:10 AM
 
Location: SoCal
13,221 posts, read 6,320,879 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by elnrgby View Post
It is transmitted by a type of mosquito. The bite is very tiny with minimal itch. For prevention, rub a DEET-containing lotion (buy several bottles cheaply at any 7 Eleven in Bangkok) all over the exposed areas (particularly ankles or over areas with prominent veins), avoid brackish water, don't use any scented cosmetics, don't hang around incense-burning areas of temples (mosquitos are attracted to scents), apply extra DEET at dusk. Sleep in strongly air-conditioned places. I was bitten twice while spending a month in SE Asia, both times when I was in temple courtyards, but did not get dengue fever. The risk is there, but is not tremendously high. There is no vaccine or treatment.
It reminds me of Moorea, near Tahiti, I was bitten alive on one tour, they took us to a remote island for BBQ and I forgot to reapply my DEET after swimming with the sharks, I was their chicken, sort of, while I was dining on grilled chicken.
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Old 02-05-2019, 11:24 AM
 
1,882 posts, read 1,437,946 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fluffythewondercat View Post
I don't think it's just retirees. Adherents of Tim Ferriss ("The 4 Hour Work Week") glommed onto the idea of moving to Thailand and making just enough money via the Internet to live on while lazing on the beach.

There are always people who are looking to get something for practically nothing, as well as those who never grow up. It doesn't surprise me when these folks fare poorly in retirement.
Does becoming a typical wage-slave earner who works a traditional work schedule signify "growing up?"

Defining what constitutes a "grown up" is pretty subjective in my opinion (hehe). But personally, I take my hat off to those who can live and be happy without falling for the notion that one has to work a typical 9-5, M-F type of job or profession. As long as a person is self-sufficient and self-supporting, there's no harm in being atypical or non-traditional (again, in my personal opinion).
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Old 02-05-2019, 11:36 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Blue Wave View Post
The fly in the ointment for retiring abroad for most Americans would be..... HEALTH INSURANCE.

By the time many people are in their 50s, they have at least a pre-existing condition or two which would make qualifying for international health insurance very difficult.

Medicare also won't cover you if you live overseas.

So what happens if you get cancer or have a heart attack abroad without insurance? You're in deep doo-doo.
But isn't the cost of healthcare in many of these countries extremely cheap (at least compared to the U.S)? I know many people travel to India to have hip replacements and knee replacements for about $10,000 to $12,000 total, which includes airfare and hotel stay I believe. Many of the medical institutions in Asia are top-notch; many of the surgeons and specialists who work in these places were trained in the U.S and Europe -- and many did their fellowships and residencies at top-tier institutions abroad. Many of these countries are indeed still third-world countries, but many still have above-average to excellent medical facilities and care (at least in select regions and areas). So I'm assuming that for less-severe problems or issues (problems not requiring major surgery or long, protracted treatments) the medical care would be relatively cheap and affordable, even for those on fixed or limited incomes.
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Old 02-05-2019, 04:04 PM
 
1,696 posts, read 610,929 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NewbieHere View Post
It reminds me of Moorea, near Tahiti, I was bitten alive on one tour, they took us to a remote island for BBQ and I forgot to reapply my DEET after swimming with the sharks, I was their chicken, sort of, while I was dining on grilled chicken.

Yes, I had the same experience in French Polynesia :-). Eaten alive in Moorea, Papeete and the Marquesas. I rather stupidly decided to use some natural mosquito repellent rather than DEET, and les mustiques completely ignored it. Fortunately, I don't think these were dengue-carrying mosquitos (although there is some dengue in Tahiti almost every year) - dengue mosquito bites are supposed to be subtle, which these surely weren't, as they left insanely itchy hives about an inch in diameter.
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Old 02-05-2019, 04:38 PM
 
Location: Haiku
4,056 posts, read 2,571,078 times
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Dengue is very serious, more so than malaria. Apparently if you get it once, the second exposure can be much more serious, likely requiring blood transfusions. There is a vaccine for it but I am not sure of the availability.
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Old 02-05-2019, 04:47 PM
 
1,696 posts, read 610,929 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AnthonyJ34 View Post
But isn't the cost of healthcare in many of these countries extremely cheap (at least compared to the U.S)? I know many people travel to India to have hip replacements and knee replacements for about $10,000 to $12,000 total, which includes airfare and hotel stay I believe. Many of the medical institutions in Asia are top-notch; many of the surgeons and specialists who work in these places were trained in the U.S and Europe -- and many did their fellowships and residencies at top-tier institutions abroad. Many of these countries are indeed still third-world countries, but many still have above-average to excellent medical facilities and care (at least in select regions and areas). So I'm assuming that for less-severe problems or issues (problems not requiring major surgery or long, protracted treatments) the medical care would be relatively cheap and affordable, even for those on fixed or limited incomes.

It is possible to get expat insurance, but very few companies sell it for people older than 65. The only company that I know of that has no age limit for international insurance is Cigna. Their insurance policy for, say, an 88 year old person, that covers inpatient care and chronic conditions, has a high deductible ($10,000 per year), and covers you in all countries excluding the US, costs just under $500 per month, or less than $6,000 per year.


Is it worth to have this insurance, or just pay out of pocket? Total cost of cardiac bypass (preoperative workup, surgery, hospital stay, everything) in an excellent hospital in Bangkok costs on average about $25,000.
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Old 02-05-2019, 04:59 PM
 
1,696 posts, read 610,929 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TwoByFour View Post
Dengue is very serious, more so than malaria. Apparently if you get it once, the second exposure can be much more serious, likely requiring blood transfusions. There is a vaccine for it but I am not sure of the availability.

Wellll... the existing vaccine protects you if you seroconvert after the vaccination, but if you don't, it puts you at risk of a much more severe form of dengue if you actually get infected after vaccination... there IS a reason why the vaccine does not exist in the US. Even in SE Asia, they give it only to people who already had dengue once, to hopefully prevent the second/worse episode. More research needed.
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Old 02-05-2019, 06:10 PM
 
245 posts, read 78,938 times
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Cost aside, if you get cancer, would you rather be treated for it in Thailand or the U.S.?
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Old 02-05-2019, 08:12 PM
 
Location: We_tside PNW (Columbia Gorge) / CO / SA TX / Thailand
22,553 posts, read 39,934,465 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Blue Wave View Post
Cost aside, if you get cancer, would you rather be treated for it in Thailand or the U.S.?
Care? you mention CARE? as in genuinely CARING for patients! Definitely Thailand (from my previous GREAT experiences in their medical system ). https://www.bumrungrad.com/

But... since the Incidence of Cancer is Thailand is quite LOW (surprise...) you will get more 'experienced' care in the cancer prone nations.. (Denmark, AU, NZ...)
https://www.wcrf.org/dietandcancer/c...quency-country

Of course cancer comes in a zillion varieties, so a prudent person (with unlimited funds, or even INSURANCE ) would want to pick the most probable 'success rate'.

https://www.pacificprime.co.th/blog/...nd-for-expats/
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3883860/

medical care in Thailand is top notch (no wonder Europeans (with national healthcare) have been using Thailand for medical care for 50+ yrs) .

If you don't have insurance (as is the case with MANY of us in USA)
Join 11M others... https://patientsbeyondborders.com/thailand (One of many options)

There is a reason the Airport terminal has Hospital Kiosks at a higher number than rental car Kiosks.

Last edited by StealthRabbit; 02-05-2019 at 08:21 PM..
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