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Old 10-28-2018, 05:11 AM
 
Location: Colorado Springs
4,864 posts, read 4,977,192 times
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I was born in 1949. Some of those memories from the 50s include:

- at age 5 walking to school alone with just my dog Skippy. She waited at the school all day, the kids would play with her at recess, and she would lead me home. At first, I didn't know the way home, but she did. I would just say "home" and she would lead me there.

- at age 4 following the trash truck down the alley and hearing the "beeta, beeta" men talk. I didn't know they were Mexicans speaking spanish. All I knew was that I couldn't understand anything they said.

- having the "milk man" deliver milk to our house every other day. He would open the kitchen door, say "milk man!" and put the glass bottles of milk into our refrigerator and take away the empties.

- having a stern father who regularly spanked us for misbehavior. I think this was wrong and I never treated my own kids that way, but it was very common back then.

- always working for my own money. At age 9 I had a paper route and I saved the $5 per week at the bank. My father inspected my passbook every week to verify my deposit. That allowed me to pay for my own college education.
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Old 10-28-2018, 05:28 AM
 
649 posts, read 555,354 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Vision67 View Post
I was born in 1949. Some of those memories from the 50s include:

- at age 5 walking to school alone with just my dog Skippy. She waited at the school all day, the kids would play with her at recess, and she would lead me home. At first, I didn't know the way home, but she did. I would just say "home" and she would lead me there.

- at age 4 following the trash truck down the alley and hearing the "beeta, beeta" men talk. I didn't know they were Mexicans speaking spanish. All I knew was that I couldn't understand anything they said.

- having the "milk man" deliver milk to our house every other day. He would open the kitchen door, say "milk man!" and put the glass bottles of milk into our refrigerator and take away the empties.

- having a stern father who regularly spanked us for misbehavior. I think this was wrong and I never treated my own kids that way, but it was very common back then.

- always working for my own money. At age 9 I had a paper route and I saved the $5 per week at the bank. My father inspected my passbook every week to verify my deposit. That allowed me to pay for my own college education.
I was born in 61 and except for the garbage men item, I could have written this. Also as others have said, parents sent me out to play right after breakfast with the instructions to be home by dinner.
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Old 10-28-2018, 05:31 AM
 
Location: R.I.
985 posts, read 608,626 times
Reputation: 4283
What sticks out most for me was when I turned 12 my parents because I was a pretty good swimmer and swam competitively let me go swimming without adult supervision at the beach at the end of our street that had no lifeguard. One early summer day while at the beach one of my neighborhood friends challenged me to swim to this island which was about a mile across the bay from the beach. This bay had heavy boat traffic which included a ferry that made several daily trips to the island I was challenged to swim to. I figured once I reached the island I could take the ferry back to town easy peasy. I took up the swim challenge, got nearly halfway across the bay and from that distance could hear my mother screaming to me to come back to shore. I learned later that one of the adults who was at the beach that day went to my house and informed my mother what I was up to. I swam back to the beach and my mother dragged me out of the water once she could get her hands on me, yelled at me all the way home which believe me that was worse than a spanking, and my punishment was no more beach for the rest of the summer.
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Old 10-28-2018, 06:14 AM
 
Location: SW Florida
9,773 posts, read 7,057,711 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ruth4Truth View Post
I've never heard of this stuff, except the latchkey kids, which isn't a big deal. That still goes on; nobody gets into hot water for it. And what's wrong with leaving kids in parked cars? As long as it's not hot or too cold out, what's the issue? You mean, because parents are expected to supervise their kids all the time? But kids go to the store on their own, anyway. They'll ride their bikes to the store to buy candy, or whatever, without any supervision.

Allowing kids into bars? Kids going "grocery shopping" for liquor and cigarettes? No way! That's very weird. I remember charge accounts at stores, but not kids being asked to bring liquor home to parents. Why didn't your parents buy their own booze, OP? The liquor store in our neighborhood wouldn't allow that, nor would the locally-owned grocery store.

I thought this thread was going to be about stuff like smoking in the car with the windows closed, and forcing kids to tolerate it.
Well, they did that too. I took many a road trip in a car filled with cigarette smoke from both my parents smoking. That's something you never get used to.

My mother used to send me to our little mom and pop market that was within walking distance ( at least for kids in those days) with $5 to buy her a carton of cigarettes. It was against the law even then to sell cigarettes to minors, and the shop owner would tell me she shouldn't be selling them to me. But then she'd go on to say that she would do so because she knew I was buying them for my mother. Back in those days a carton of cigarettes was $4 and change and I'd buy myself a candy bar for my trouble.
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Old 10-28-2018, 06:16 AM
 
5,422 posts, read 15,481,628 times
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Leaving the house after breakfast on my Schwinn (no helmet) with instructions to be home by dinner. In the summer, we'd all take our bikes to the city swimming pool and spend the day there without adult supervision.

Riding around in the front seat of our DeSoto Adventurer with no seat belts on. I remember going around a bend once and I must have hit the door lever because the next thing I knew I was rolling out of the car and onto the street. I brushed myself off, got back into the car, and we continued on as if nothing ever happened.

My parents did not smoke or drink, so I never had to go to the store to buy smokes for them. The only thing I remember was going into the dry cleaners to get my dad's clothes, or going into Isalys for some chipped ham, while they waited in the car.
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Old 10-28-2018, 06:26 AM
 
Location: Coastal Georgia
37,162 posts, read 45,724,245 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ruth4Truth View Post
I've never heard of this stuff, except the latchkey kids, which isn't a big deal. That still goes on; nobody gets into hot water for it. And what's wrong with leaving kids in parked cars? As long as it's not hot or too cold out, what's the issue? You mean, because parents are expected to supervise their kids all the time? But kids go to the store on their own, anyway. They'll ride their bikes to the store to buy candy, or whatever, without any supervision.

Allowing kids into bars? Kids going "grocery shopping" for liquor and cigarettes? No way! That's very weird. I remember charge accounts at stores, but not kids being asked to bring liquor home to parents. Why didn't your parents buy their own booze, OP? The liquor store in our neighborhood wouldn't allow that, nor would the locally-owned grocery store.

I thought this thread was going to be about stuff like smoking in the car with the windows closed, and forcing kids to tolerate it.
No, those things are true. Earlier than the 70s, those things were all commonplace. My husbandís father regularly took him into bars in their small town. Any store would sell cigarettes or beer, etc. with a note.

We grew up with no seatbelts and everyoneís parents smoked, so we rode with the windows down and the smoke and ashes wafted into the back seat.

More than once my husbandís father was driven home by the neighborhood cop, when he was too drunk to drive.
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Old 10-28-2018, 06:35 AM
 
Location: northern New England
2,484 posts, read 1,081,267 times
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I would go to the store and buy cigs for stepmother. Also remember being left in the car outside a store at night (maybe they were buying presents for me, can't remember). Walking to and from school alone,and coming home for lunch.



In grades 8-9 I was in a different town. Grade 9 I was almost 2 miles from the high school. Over 2 miles, you got a bus pass. I did not have one. Riding in was never a problem, don't know why. Riding home, kids with no pass lined up while the pass kids got on first. Then IF there was room, they would take some of the kids lined up. Oh, and we had double sessions, so school for me was 12-5. There were many times I walked home, 2 miles, at 5PM, dark in the winter, in New England.
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Old 10-28-2018, 06:47 AM
 
Location: Colorado Springs
4,864 posts, read 4,977,192 times
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For many of us growing up in the 50s and early 60s, that was an era prior to birth control and our parents had large families. I guess they were good at just one thing.

A typical family back then had 3-6 kids. Ours had 7. We also had just one car, a huge 1962 Chevy Impala Wagon that would carry 9 passengers. Dad drove that car to work every day.

When you have 7 kids and just one car you cannot be a "helicopter parent". We kids had to become self reliant and learn to solve our own problems. We either walked or rode bikes everywhere. As long as we showed up for dinner at 5 PM, everything was OK. We did many things that by today's standards would be considered reckless. That which hurts instructs.

Sometimes I think it was actually better back then. When you learn at a young age that you can actually solve your own problems and get things done you build self confidence. That reduces anxiety.

We didn't need Prozac.
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Old 10-28-2018, 06:51 AM
 
Location: Cebu, Philippines
4,473 posts, read 1,698,732 times
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I was left home alone at night from age 8, while my 13 old sister went out to babysit. Walked to school alone every day from first grade, almost a mile.
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Old 10-28-2018, 07:10 AM
 
Location: ☀️ SWFL ⛱ 🌴
2,441 posts, read 1,678,624 times
Reputation: 8726
I rode my bike to summer rec at school most days, two miles away, riding by large expanses of farm acreage and seeing very few people. I was 10 at the time. As long as I was home for dinner/supper there was no problem. My favorite spot to read a book was across the field behind our house, over a fence and into a pine woods. That was my secret place that I told no one about. No one really knew exactly where I was most days, I told them where I was going, but sometimes changed my mind. This was the early 60’s.

As a married adult, I lived in a small village and the fire department blew their loud whistle at 5 every evening when our son was growing up in the late 80’s. It was known as the time-to-come-home whistle, no excuses accepted since it was heard everywhere. I knew more of his whereabouts than my parents knew about mine, but of course I heard stories year later and realized I didn’t know as much as I thought.

Our grandkid’s freedom is even more restricted now, but they are young yet. It will be interesting to see how much or little they will be allowed as they grow up with cell phones and gps.

Last edited by jean_ji; 10-28-2018 at 07:34 AM..
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