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Old 10-28-2018, 06:00 PM
 
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Only thing about having an older sister or female cousin in charge is you sometimes got stuck with a bossy boots. Moms and other adult females used to say of such girls "8 going on 88" or some such.


Lucy VanPelt (Linus's sister from Peanuts comics" wasn't just pulled out of thin air. Sadly many kids suffered an older sister or whatever who was bossy 24/7, not just when mom (or dad) was out.
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Old 10-28-2018, 06:18 PM
 
20,793 posts, read 13,798,557 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 2bpurrfect View Post
the local bar could have just been more of a soda shop/bar that allowed kids under supervision of an adult. even now there are bars that have tables for dinner, and kids can go with an adult.
Still have latchkey kids, and probably legal. Also kids in cars? i think that's more about little kids, and in bad weather too. Never heard of older kids not allowed in cars. There may be an age cutoff depending on t he locality.
I think kids before 1965 were pretty much at the mercy of thier parents as far as corporal punishment. And even sex abuse was ignored, as i recall. Nowadays the cops in most places can't legally ignore reports of it, thank God.

Schools used to paddle us real hard for skipping class. I don't think it's allowed in most places now. And very glad of it. I got pretty bruised from it. (1970's).

No, it was a straight up bar that served booze.


Parents did it then, and are still doing it today!


https://nypost.com/2017/07/18/should...-kids-to-bars/




Brooklyn brewhaha: Babies in bars - CNN.com


And this pretty sums up why:


"The Puritanical nonsense of excluding children and therefore to some extent women from pubs has turned these places into mere boozing shops instead of the family gathering places that they ought to be."
George Orwell


If you recall it was largely in part to the "loose" ways with booze (mostly beer but the hard stuff as well), of Irish, German and other European immigrants that got WASPs riled up and began a movement which lead to Prohibition. Fact that Germans drank beer as natural to them as water which mean on the Sabbath (Sunday), at family picnics, beer gardens or whatever even with women and children present was more than some Puritanical Americans could bear.


Meanwhile we know very well that those same WASPS boozed just as much as the "immigrants", just preferred to do so in privacy of their homes or clubs. Joe Kennedy and others made a mint selling booze smuggled over from Canada to supply elite whites/WASPS during Prohibition.


In the "old country" pubs/bars are social gathering places. Depending upon reputation of the place they weren't off limits to a respectable wife/mother either. As such kids often were present with either one of both parents.
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Old 10-28-2018, 07:59 PM
 
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During a vacation, we drove in the family station wagon from Chicago to Disneyland in California and made a stop in Las Vegas. I was six, and my baby brother (aged 3) and I sat in that station wagon for two days, armed with coloring books and crayons. It was 1964. I remember the looks of strangers, amazed even back then that two such young children would be left in a parked car outside of a casino all day (except for when they brought us some lunch.)

As for corporal punishment, there was plenty of that, but when my drunken father hit me so hard one night that it left a handprint on my face, my third grade teacher was concerned enough to consult my parents, who informed her I'd aggravated my father with crying from recurring nightmares (later determined to be from environmental stress). After that, he was careful to hit me where it wouldn't show. If that had happened today, I'm sure some additional investigation would be conducted and once the severity of the beatings was revealed, my siblings and I would have been removed from the home. (It didn't stop until I moved out at 18.) Ah, the good old days.
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Old 10-28-2018, 10:40 PM
 
Location: White House, TN
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My dad let me ride in the front seat throughout my entire childhood from when I was old enough to not be in a car seat (4 years old). I'm 25 years old now.

If I had been just 4 years younger, that would have been illegal. I was born December 25, 1992 and I believe the cut-off birth date was July 1, 1996.

Things have changed a lot even since I was a little kid.
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Old 10-29-2018, 12:05 AM
 
Location: Australia
914 posts, read 335,544 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wawa1992 View Post
My dad let me ride in the front seat throughout my entire childhood from when I was old enough to not be in a car seat (4 years old). I'm 25 years old now.

If I had been just 4 years younger, that would have been illegal. I was born December 25, 1992 and I believe the cut-off birth date was July 1, 1996.

Things have changed a lot even since I was a little kid.
One of our well known (to us) writers has just brought out a book on much the same topic as this thread. In it he writes about life before seatbelts and when drinking and driving was the norm but does make the point that the road toll has declined very dramatically since those cultural changes, despite a huge growth in the number of drivers and passengers.

The most annoying but necessary change for grandparents are our laws which require tethered car seats for children, in NSW until they are about five. Then they can have a booster seat using the seatbelts. We all get to drive around with a couple of tethered car seats in the back for the once or twice a week we carry the grandkids.

In South Australia there is an unsolved (presumed) murder from the 1960s where three young children were sent off to the beach alone, by bus, and were never seen again. Parents would not dream of doing that these days.
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Old 10-29-2018, 02:51 AM
 
Location: Tucson/Nogales
17,417 posts, read 21,263,654 times
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On the way to ballrooms to dance away the night, my parents would have their drinks in the car on the way to the ballroom to save money on drinks.

And I remember back in the 50's, my Dad throwing trash out the car window.
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Old 10-29-2018, 04:53 AM
 
Location: Wilmington, NC
1,938 posts, read 350,041 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by newmarlig View Post
Letting me get on my bike on a summer morning and not returning home until dinner time.
This! Spent many a Saturday wandering all over on my bike with my best friend. My mom had a vague idea where we were, as we knew not to leave the neighborhood.

Halloween without parents. We were out at night for several hours and my parents never seemed to worry about us at all.
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Old 10-29-2018, 06:21 AM
 
6,640 posts, read 1,372,282 times
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Amazing to me how many of us had such terrible parents and yet we survived just fine. (sarcasm)

Seriously, though, I wonder how many U.S. children today will have wonderful memories of their childhoods 50 or more years from now?


P.S. It would make for an interesting poll of retirees to see how many of us did have happy childhoods, or at least for the most part. I personally have posted many times about my less-than-ideal childhood (to say the least!), but I would still say that, overall, I have very fond memories of my childhood until I was almost ten, and we moved from Ohio to SoCal in 1963.
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Old 10-29-2018, 07:56 AM
 
127 posts, read 43,957 times
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In the 1960s and 1970s, we worked for farmers picking strawberries, pole beans, blackberries, and cherries during the summer. This is when we were 8, 9, 10 year olds up to high school age (at high school age, you got harder jobs like hauling hay and working in the canneries). Then they implemented child labor laws (you had to be older than 12) and all those money making opportunities went away (and farmers then mechanized their picking).
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Old 10-29-2018, 10:06 AM
 
825 posts, read 566,016 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Vision67 View Post
For many of us growing up in the 50s and early 60s, that was an era prior to birth control and our parents had large families. I guess they were good at just one thing.

A typical family back then had 3-6 kids. Ours had 7. We also had just one car, a huge 1962 Chevy Impala Wagon that would carry 9 passengers. Dad drove that car to work every day.

When you have 7 kids and just one car you cannot be a "helicopter parent". We kids had to become self reliant and learn to solve our own problems. We either walked or rode bikes everywhere. As long as we showed up for dinner at 5 PM, everything was OK. We did many things that by today's standards would be considered reckless. That which hurts instructs.

Sometimes I think it was actually better back then. When you learn at a young age that you can actually solve your own problems and get things done you build self confidence. That reduces anxiety.

We didn't need Prozac.
This exactly mirrors my experience in a family with 7 kids. The girls in our family had chores inside the house (meal prep, laundry, dishes, housecleaning, bathing/diapering the little ones). But as long as the chores were done, we were off on our own.

In California, my father also drove the one (huge) station wagon to work every day. My mother was sort of stuck at home with young children. If she needed to shop for groceries, I did it for her, on my bike. I had a big cardboard box secured to the rear platform on my bike. Later on, in New England, my mother would drop my father off at the train station, and she would keep the car for the day.

My brother once broke his arm skateboarding in an empty swimming pool. My sister was hit while walking her bike across a busy street, and her leg was broken in a compound fracture. These were the only major injuries received during 7 childhoods of roaming free.
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