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Old 10-30-2018, 04:22 PM
 
Location: Ohio
19,875 posts, read 14,217,545 times
Reputation: 16064

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Serious Conversation View Post
There seems to be a chronic shortage of personnel. If medicine is supposed to be doled out and taken at 7 AM, it's not uncommon for the patient to be waiting around well past 9 AM with no medicine. Meals aren't doled out on time, and trays aren't collected frequently. It can easily take a half hour for someone to respond to a call light.
That's unique to a specific place.

I spent 28 days in one about 2 year ago, and the care was excellent and the food awesome, usually with seconds offered.

It was, however, a very small facility in a small town (Batavia, Ohio). There were only 24 beds, four single rooms and eight double-occupancy rooms for "permanent" patients, and four beds for rehab.

There was a nurse, an LPN and 4 CNAs for each shift.

I did notice some people were there, and then they weren't. In listening to people talk, there was apparently a very high turn-over rate for the CNAs, but the RNs and LPNs and been there for years and years.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Serious Conversation View Post
The care certainly isn't prompt.
That's dependent on the size of the facility.

In large facilities, like with 124 patients, not everyone is going to get their medication at 7:00 AM on-the-dot, unless you have 124 nurses on duty, and that's just not going to happen.

I didn't get my medication at 9:00 AM or 9:00 PM, either, but the nurses did start their rounds on time, and instead of throwing medication at patients and moving onto the next patient, they talked to the patients for a few minutes, gave them their medication and then talked a few minutes more, which is more humane than throwing pills at someone.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Serious Conversation View Post
CNAs here get paid $9-$11/hr mostly. Chick-Fil-A is hiring $11/hr full time. "Vegetable choppers" at Panda Express make $11/hr. What would you rather do?
If you're going to pay CNA's $15/hour, healthcare is going to get real expensive real fast.

Remember the wage is only one component of Labor Cost.

Labor Cost = Wage Cost + Benefit Cost + Government Cost

Increasing wages increases the cost of benefits, plus increases the cost of Social Security, Medicare, SUTA, FUTA, Worker's Compensation, and business/casualty insurance.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Serious Conversation View Post
One thing on the genetic component of this. Many folks who may not think they have a family of history may in fact do - it's just that the family members aren't living long enough to get to the typical "dementia ages."
That's a good point.

I do genealogy, and while I've only seen Alzheimer's listed once on an autopsy report, I have read obituaries stating a person was "battling Alzheimer's." I've seen where siblings had Alzheimer's.

While those persons are related by DNA, they were not contributors to my DNA.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Roselvr View Post
I was on neurontin about 10 years ago (in my 40's). I stopped taking it one day when my son and I went to DMV, I had no clue why I was there.
I've been taking neurontin for over 10 years. In fact, since 2003. I've not experienced any side effects of any kind.

I take it for neuropathy related to nerve damage I sustained in the Gulf War.

Quote:
Originally Posted by GeoffD View Post
This isn't accurate. Dementia is a symptom.
Dementia is not a symptom. The symptom is memory loss or cognitive impairment or both, and the cause is Dementia. There are various forms of Dementia, including several diseases and brain trauma, which includes strokes and there's Vascular Dementia resulting from damage, deterioration or blockages of the brain's blood vessels.
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Old 10-30-2018, 09:26 PM
 
Location: too far from the sea
19,821 posts, read 18,826,487 times
Reputation: 33710
Since I was the person who brought up the neurontin that caused my cousin's dementia, I want to emphasize that she was on a high dose. That's what stood out to the specialist who then called her pcp about it. They lowered the dose and my cousin's memory came back overnight. She was never quite the same though.

And, from what I've learned, you can't diagnose Alzheimer's until after death. Dementia is probably the broader term.
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Old 10-30-2018, 10:10 PM
 
Location: Tennessee
23,541 posts, read 17,525,434 times
Reputation: 27573
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mircea View Post
That's unique to a specific place.

I spent 28 days in one about 2 year ago, and the care was excellent and the food awesome, usually with seconds offered.

It was, however, a very small facility in a small town (Batavia, Ohio). There were only 24 beds, four single rooms and eight double-occupancy rooms for "permanent" patients, and four beds for rehab.

There was a nurse, an LPN and 4 CNAs for each shift.

I did notice some people were there, and then they weren't. In listening to people talk, there was apparently a very high turn-over rate for the CNAs, but the RNs and LPNs and been there for years and years.

That's dependent on the size of the facility.

In large facilities, like with 124 patients, not everyone is going to get their medication at 7:00 AM on-the-dot, unless you have 124 nurses on duty, and that's just not going to happen.

I didn't get my medication at 9:00 AM or 9:00 PM, either, but the nurses did start their rounds on time, and instead of throwing medication at patients and moving onto the next patient, they talked to the patients for a few minutes, gave them their medication and then talked a few minutes more, which is more humane than throwing pills at someone.

If you're going to pay CNA's $15/hour, healthcare is going to get real expensive real fast.

Remember the wage is only one component of Labor Cost.

Labor Cost = Wage Cost + Benefit Cost + Government Cost

Increasing wages increases the cost of benefits, plus increases the cost of Social Security, Medicare, SUTA, FUTA, Worker's Compensation, and business/casualty insurance.

That's a good point.

I do genealogy, and while I've only seen Alzheimer's listed once on an autopsy report, I have read obituaries stating a person was "battling Alzheimer's." I've seen where siblings had Alzheimer's.
There are probably at least 100 beds at the facility my girlfriend is at. Technically, the second floor is "rehab" and the third floor is "skilled nursing," but it's all functionally jumbled up.

My girlfriend is 24 and had two recent hip replacements, and is coming home tomorrow. She hated the nursing care there, but the physical and occupational therapy were excellent. She is now able to walk about a quarter mile with a walker or crutches, and can do about 500 ft. on a cane. This is coming from a lupus patient with significant muscle loss/bone wasting who hasn't walked in over a year.

I'm not sure wages should be raised. A CNA is a relatively unskilled position. Turnover, while high, seems manageable. I don't know what the standards are for care delivered by CNAs, and if this facility met industry standards. I've been in quite a few skilled care facilities seeing aged family members, and I noticed nothing out of the ordinary at this particular place. With that said, if turnover is an issue to the point that staffing levels are dangerously low, and wages are cited as a problem in exit interviews, a wage adjustment should occur.
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Old 11-01-2018, 09:02 PM
 
Location: Southern California
23,636 posts, read 8,219,173 times
Reputation: 15428
This subject has been discussed so much here and also on other health groups I'm a member.

For me and prevention I take my daily antioxidants: higher dosing of Vit C and Grape Seed Extract.

Take at least 1t daily of Coconut Oil, and do cook with it so I get more than 1t.

Stay away from statin drugs, we need good cholesterol for our brains. The medical world I believe has done a JOB on too many and hence the advancing dementia. People have the belief that low cholesterol is their friend, not so from all I've read -- actually the enemy.

My opinions and what I do. And I'm 80 and mind is good.

My own folks lived into 90's and I'm sure had no clue about cholesterol and ate plenty of good fats and both had good minds when they left here.
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Old 11-02-2018, 07:25 AM
 
1,137 posts, read 569,034 times
Reputation: 4370
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheShadow View Post
Next appointment, ask your doctor to administer the MMSE (Mini Mental State Exam). It's a short quiz, about 10 minutes long, that can help detect early dementia issues.

It includes simple questions, being asked to recall 3 words and repeat them back later, physically following a series of three instructions, repeating a sentence with words not commonly used together. Drawing a clock from memory, or copying a drawing of two overlapping pentagons. Seems pretty easy if you don't have memory problems, but determinant of particular areas that are difficult for those who do.
Haha! I just had that test yesterday, didn't know it was coming. I had my first Medicare 'Wellness' visit, and had to go through that regimen. I thought the nurse was going to smack me though, because I added a digital clock and date/time to the analog one she asked for...
If life isn't for enjoyment, what the heck?
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Old 11-02-2018, 05:00 PM
 
Location: Southern California
23,636 posts, read 8,219,173 times
Reputation: 15428
More reminders on Prevention:

https://www.nutrientinsider.com/News..._content=Link#
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Old 11-02-2018, 05:04 PM
 
Location: Southern California
23,636 posts, read 8,219,173 times
Reputation: 15428
Quote:
Originally Posted by Serious Conversation View Post
There are probably at least 100 beds at the facility my girlfriend is at. Technically, the second floor is "rehab" and the third floor is "skilled nursing," but it's all functionally jumbled up.

My girlfriend is 24 and had two recent hip replacements, and is coming home tomorrow. She hated the nursing care there, but the physical and occupational therapy were excellent. She is now able to walk about a quarter mile with a walker or crutches, and can do about 500 ft. on a cane. This is coming from a lupus patient with significant muscle loss/bone wasting who hasn't walked in over a year.

I'm not sure wages should be raised. A CNA is a relatively unskilled position. Turnover, while high, seems manageable. I don't know what the standards are for care delivered by CNAs, and if this facility met industry standards. I've been in quite a few skilled care facilities seeing aged family members, and I noticed nothing out of the ordinary at this particular place. With that said, if turnover is an issue to the point that staffing levels are dangerously low, and wages are cited as a problem in exit interviews, a wage adjustment should occur.
Those rehab facilities are necessary evils. Can't hate them. They serve a major purpose.

I was in 3 different ones, long story, and the CNA's were the greatest and most underpaid. Do all the dirty work. I saw it all as a patient.

Hope your gf continues to do well. Long journey she's been on and so young.

I struggle with a hip replacement after 8 yrs but can't undo what 's done.
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Old 11-02-2018, 05:10 PM
 
Location: Born in L.A. - NYC is Second Home - Rustbelt is Home Base
1,608 posts, read 740,356 times
Reputation: 1372
OP...also Downs syndrome crisis. All the old caregivers will be dying.
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Old 11-02-2018, 06:21 PM
 
Location: Southern California
23,636 posts, read 8,219,173 times
Reputation: 15428
Quote:
Originally Posted by slackercruster View Post
OP...also Downs syndrome crisis. All the old caregivers will be dying.
I don't get this comment? Downs people die pretty young.
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Old 11-03-2018, 01:18 PM
 
6,875 posts, read 7,267,992 times
Reputation: 9785
Quote:
I don't get this comment? Downs people die pretty young.
No.
There are plenty of adults with Downs Syndrome. The life expectancy for people with DS is 60 years old.
Certainly by the time people are 60, their parents -- if not already deceased, would likely NOT be any position to still be taking care of their children (if need be.).

On this topic, there is an EXCELLENT PBS Independent Lens documentary called "Mimi and Dona"

"92-year-old Mimi spent much of her life caring for 64-year-old daughter Dona, who's as an intellectual disability. They must face the inevitable — the likelihood that she will not outlive her daughter and the need to find her a new home."

In the case of aging parents not being able to care for their special needs/disabled children, that's always been a small minority in terms of numbers -- and family members (siblings/aunts/uncles, etc) have usually stepped up as best they could.

But the number of people with dementia/Alzheimer's could truly become alarmingly high. The numbers alone could raise it to crisis level.

Last edited by selhars; 11-03-2018 at 01:30 PM..
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