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Old 10-30-2018, 06:33 AM
 
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we have the original ERTE millionairess suite .

my wife bought it decades ago for 5k .today it is worth 25k . but they were never bought as an investment . my wife just liked them and wanted them . so we don't even consider them as part of our balance sheet



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Old 10-30-2018, 07:32 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by galaxyhi View Post
I have ( and used to buy/collect) classic Disney cels

Back in the 1980s when my son was growing up I bought two Disney cels. One was a fairly recent one of Darkwing Duck which was one of his favorites. The other one was of Uncle Scrooge who was MY favorite Disney character, lol.

The Scrooge one was all hand painted but you could tell that the Darkwing one was not. Big difference, and the prices of the two reflected that.

Both were eventually sold during the first downsizing in the early 2000s. I would guess that the old hand painted cels are getting harder and harder to find these days. Real authentic ones, I mean.
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Old 10-30-2018, 07:40 AM
 
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You might want to peruse college art shows. Often the art is for sale, and you can meet and talk to the artists. And this includes community colleges too. Other places to look? Our libraries here often sponsor art shows, and there are many art clubs in the area that host shows and sales (e.g., at the local brewery). County fairs are another place to look.
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Old 10-30-2018, 07:44 AM
 
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Originally Posted by Tek_Freek View Post
Most of ours are from "unknowns" (to us anyway) that we found at art shows. Three are by Lena Liu, and they are beautiful.

Lena Liu is definitely not an unknown. :-) I agree, her work is lovely with that misty quality. I have two of her limited edition prints. One is a white peacock in a castle garden and the other is a pair of swans swimming past a stand of bronze colored daylilies.

Another artist whose work found its way into the mainstream was/is Fabrice Villeneuve. I liked his floral studies and have a couple as prints.

I wish I could afford any original art by Kinuko Craft. I have four of her prints, and several childrens books illustrated by her, but the originals are way out of my budget. Even some of the giclee prints are as well, unfortunately. There is a painting that she did about ten years ago called Goddess of The Universe that is absolutely stunning and was issued as a limited edition giclee print but even that sells for more than $1200.
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Old 10-30-2018, 08:06 AM
 
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Art as an investment is like collecting cars for an investment. Lots of folks will talk about the vintage car they paid 10K for and sold for 50K but rarely do they do the actual math of what that car really cost them (20 yrs of upkeep, insurance, storage, auction fees, etc). TV auctions get people all excited because of the big numbers on the screen but the reality is the buyers paid money to transport their car there, then entrance fees, then commissions so that big number is usually reduced 10-15-20%.

Art suffers from the same issues. While there probably isn't a big cost on upkeep/storage for art, if it is truly a 50mm Picasso then I would expect the insurance to be significant and the auction house will certainly want their commissions for selling it.

The elephant in the room.......opportunity cost! If you put 10K in a mutual fund for 20 years then what is that worth now vs. buying/holding a piece of art or automobile? TVM can't be underestimated here.
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Old 10-30-2018, 08:07 AM
 
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I love to buy original artwork, and also am fond of some posters and limited edition prints. My late mother-in-law was an artist, so we have some of her work, too. "Sunday" painters are some of my very favorites, and I usually buy works donated to charitable thrift shops.

Our walls are filled with artwork and sometimes we rotate it. We have some paintings that have not gone up on the walls yet, since we inherited them. But they will, eventually.

We prefer a more Midwestern School and also California Impressionist type paintings. Love artists that painted in the Nashville, Indiana area, too. Landscapes, boats, old bridges, trains and stations, old school buildings....we even have a painting of someone's beloved Collie dog [it probably cost no more than $10 at the thrift store but it is beautiful]. We live in the Southwest but do not care for that style, although one of our married daughters who grew up here does like it -- but that's okay! Differences are good. Another of our Munchkins loves Norman Rockwell.
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Old 10-30-2018, 08:22 AM
 
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A family member collected limited edition porcelain figurines (Boehm, Cybis, Royal Worcester, etc) during the 1970s when such things were bringing big bucks. I remember them paying anywhere from $1500 to $3000 each for many of them and they had several display cabinets full. One in particular of a Great Horned Owl sticks in my memory as costing $3000 at the time. They must have had at least $30K worth, easily.

Fast forward to the late 1990s when the husband died and his wife (my cousin) needed to liquidate the collection that they'd thought was such a great investment. What a shock: in the meantime eBay had appeared and the bottom fell out of the so-called "collectibles" market. I often see the same pieces they paid $2000 for, listed on eBay for less than $200. Sometimes under $100. Last year I happened to see a piece I'd admired in their collection on eBay for $50 so I bought it. Looked up the original 1970s price online and it was $600 back in the day. So much for "investment".

I felt sorry for my cousin though, because she took such a loss on their collection. Their son helped her sell it on eBay because the local antiques etc stores had no interest in the pieces.
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Old 10-30-2018, 09:31 AM
 
28,263 posts, read 39,927,756 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by City Guy997S View Post
Art as an investment is like collecting cars for an investment. Lots of folks will talk about the vintage car they paid 10K for and sold for 50K but rarely do they do the actual math of what that car really cost them (20 yrs of upkeep, insurance, storage, auction fees, etc). TV auctions get people all excited because of the big numbers on the screen but the reality is the buyers paid money to transport their car there, then entrance fees, then commissions so that big number is usually reduced 10-15-20%.

Art suffers from the same issues. While there probably isn't a big cost on upkeep/storage for art, if it is truly a 50mm Picasso then I would expect the insurance to be significant and the auction house will certainly want their commissions for selling it.

The elephant in the room.......opportunity cost! If you put 10K in a mutual fund for 20 years then what is that worth now vs. buying/holding a piece of art or automobile? TVM can't be underestimated here.
We've never considered any of it an investment. If we like it and can afford it we buy it.

When my mother passed we inherited hundreds of pieces of art glass and depression glass. Some of it is absolutely beautiful. Most went to auction when we moved and we got what we expected for it. Not much. But we kept the "nice" pieces.
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Old 10-30-2018, 10:53 AM
 
Location: 5,400 feet
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We collect pueblo pottery (mostly Acoma and Nambe), Navajo rugs and some local art glass. It got a bit voluminous, so we have sold or donated many pieces and curtailed our buying.
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Old 10-30-2018, 11:02 AM
 
1,635 posts, read 751,237 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fluffythewondercat View Post
Do you search for art that speaks to you?
I don't search it out but when I stumble across it and it speaks to me if it is within my modest budget I buy it. It might be direct from the artist, a find at the thrift store or yard sale, or, best of all, free in a pile at the curb. I have an eclectic taste.

And some, I make myself.
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