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Old 10-30-2018, 12:05 PM
 
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As it is my first name I was destined to pursue this medium.
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Old 10-30-2018, 02:31 PM
 
1,215 posts, read 441,007 times
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No.
Most 'art' nowadays, especially the abstract, monkey-coulda-slapped-it-on variety, does nothing for me.
And I wouldn't hang an old master if you paid me.
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Old 10-30-2018, 02:46 PM
 
Location: Scottsdale, AZ
7,741 posts, read 4,758,012 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PamelaIamela View Post
No.
Most 'art' nowadays, especially the abstract, monkey-coulda-slapped-it-on variety, does nothing for me.
And I wouldn't hang an old master if you paid me.

I don't imagine he would enjoy it, either!
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Old 10-30-2018, 02:48 PM
 
7,954 posts, read 5,060,903 times
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Originally Posted by City Guy997S View Post
Art as an investment is like collecting cars for an investment. Lots of folks will talk about the vintage car they paid 10K for and sold for 50K but rarely do they do the actual math of what that car really cost them...

The elephant in the room.......opportunity cost! If you put 10K in a mutual fund for 20 years then what is that worth now vs. buying/holding a piece of art or automobile? TVM can't be underestimated here.
This is true, to a point. The great appeal of paper-assets is zero cost of storage or insurance or maintenance, and high liquidity. But the past 20 years are an unfortunate example. Since 1998, US equities have somewhat more than doubled. Foreign equities have generally done worse. Over the same 20 years, a collectable car would likely have increased by well over 2X. But tastes shift, and one may surmise for example that as the Baby Boomers pass on, 60s muscle cars would stagnate in value, if not decline. The same presumably holds for art.

Is there such a thing, as an art index fund?
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Old 10-30-2018, 03:51 PM
 
Location: on the wind
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Originally Posted by BBCjunkie View Post
A family member collected limited edition porcelain figurines (Boehm, Cybis, Royal Worcester, etc) during the 1970s when such things were bringing big bucks. I remember them paying anywhere from $1500 to $3000 each for many of them and they had several display cabinets full. One in particular of a Great Horned Owl sticks in my memory as costing $3000 at the time. They must have had at least $30K worth, easily.

Fast forward to the late 1990s when the husband died and his wife (my cousin) needed to liquidate the collection that they'd thought was such a great investment. What a shock: in the meantime eBay had appeared and the bottom fell out of the so-called "collectibles" market. I often see the same pieces they paid $2000 for, listed on eBay for less than $200. Sometimes under $100. Last year I happened to see a piece I'd admired in their collection on eBay for $50 so I bought it. Looked up the original 1970s price online and it was $600 back in the day. So much for "investment".

I felt sorry for my cousin though, because she took such a loss on their collection. Their son helped her sell it on eBay because the local antiques etc stores had no interest in the pieces.
But if the family member loved the hunt for them, cherished and enjoyed them, they were "valuable" in her eyes. The money gained or lost isn't the point. Unless it was.
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Old 10-30-2018, 04:13 PM
 
Location: Coastal Georgia
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Originally Posted by jim9251 View Post
I like Thomas Kinkade. I have The End of the Perfect Day II. Bought it 20 years ago. Can't afford anything else. All the "art" I have are photographs I took.
Some people would consider that not art. But if you respond to it and love it, then that is all that matters.
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Old 10-30-2018, 04:31 PM
 
1,688 posts, read 581,526 times
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Originally Posted by Parnassia View Post
But if the family member loved the hunt for them, cherished and enjoyed them, they were "valuable" in her eyes. The money gained or lost isn't the point. Unless it was.

Well, the supposed/touted increase in value was part of the reason they bought these things, I'm sure. It wasn't as if they had money to burn. Based on the prices that dealers/galleries were getting for the already-retired/completed ones as secondary-market pieces, there was no reason for them to assume that monetary appreciation wouldn't be part of the equation in the future.

Her husband left her with unexpected debts but she assumed that the sale of the collection would more than cover them. Unfortunately it didn't, so in that respect it did become the point (ultimately.)

I remember she was especially upset about one piece which was a bird produced for only a few years during the 1950s at about $75 if I recall correctly. That was about 15 years before they began collecting, and it was one she really wanted (from a photo she'd seen); it took her a long time to find one for sale. She paid $1200 for it (I remember this clearly because I was shocked at the price, for what it was) when one turned up and was so proud to have found it. Later on she assumed that being one of the oldest birds it would bring the most money when she went to sell the collection. Turns out it was one of the very last ones to find a buyer and the most she could get for it was $50. I asked her why she didn't just keep it instead, and she said that looking at it made her feel like a fool to have spent so much money for something that turned out to be worth so little. The end result spoiled what had gone before, for her, I guess.
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Old 10-30-2018, 04:32 PM
 
Location: Coastal Georgia
37,155 posts, read 45,714,466 times
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Originally Posted by fluffythewondercat View Post
So the sellers are leaving most of the furniture in the new house but they're taking nearly all the art. I've been looking in local galleries when I've had time, which isn't often.

I found a painting that seems almost emblematic of retirement: A swimsuited woman on a river in an inner tube, with a drink in one hand and the other hand trailing in the water, creating little sparks of light. I wanted to buy it but first I needed to know more about the artist. Maybe it's weird, but I like to support deserving artists and feel as though I made a tiny difference in their life by buying their work.

The eye-opener: The artist and her husband just donated $20 million to the not-for-profit medical group where I receive most of my care. The facility I use is about to be named after them. So much for starving artists!

Do you search for art that speaks to you?
Of course. What other reason is there? Donít buy art for an investment, but only buy it because it amuses you, or makes you think, or you love looking at, and see something new every time you look at it.

I was a museum docent for 12 years. We docents got invited to artists studios, and had the opportunity to buy their art, if we wanted. We are retired, so no longer in buying mode, but we love our amusing pieces of art which was chosen for the right reasons....just because we liked it, and we still do.

Now, Iíll talk about some friends. The wife had become disabled and the husband spent down by buying things like Kincaid paintings. That is like flushing your money down the toilet.
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Old 10-30-2018, 04:40 PM
 
Location: Scottsdale, AZ
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Originally Posted by gentlearts View Post
Now, Iíll talk about some friends. The wife had become disabled and the husband spent down by buying things like Kincaid paintings. That is like flushing your money down the toilet.

I'm gonna guess you also wouldn't like my vast collection of poker-playing dogs.
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Old 10-30-2018, 04:45 PM
 
659 posts, read 326,052 times
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I don't buy art to hang on the wall; but I would buy an interesting (inexpensive) figurine. I've got art that I haven't even hung. I'm supposed to be downsizing and not bring more crap into the house for my sons to get rid off when I go.
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