U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Retirement
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 11-06-2018, 07:24 AM
 
11,992 posts, read 5,122,573 times
Reputation: 18743

Advertisements

Good grief. Not all seniors are in their late 80s and 90s helpless and starving. A good amount are in their 60s to mid 70s and fairly healthy and have no problem standing and walking for a few hours a day. This is part time work, maybe just 10 to 20 hours a week. It's not a career people pickup when they reach a certain age.
Many seniors do this because it gets them out of the house and gives them the opportunity to socialize with all kinds of people. No one's life will be in danger if they make a mistake. They aren't working at a nuclear power plant.
The vast majority of seniors are doing just fine in retirement even if they are not wealthy.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 11-06-2018, 07:27 AM
 
Location: East of Seattle since 1992, originally from SF Bay Area
29,806 posts, read 54,455,776 times
Reputation: 31111
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vision67 View Post
Stand all day at Micky Dees for $12 per hour?

No way! I'd rather be dead.
Here fast food pay starts at $15. For someone on SS perhaps with a small pension, working 20 hours a week at that pay is $300/week, and can make a big difference in their financial situation. Where I work (large office) many people are now having the stand-up computer desks installed, and our average age is 50. Walking around I see people in their 60s standing while working, by choice.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-06-2018, 07:55 AM
Status: "Disagreeing is not the same thing as trolling." (set 11 days ago)
 
Location: Texas
9,536 posts, read 3,654,679 times
Reputation: 19553
Quote:
Originally Posted by marino760 View Post
Good grief. Not all seniors are in their late 80s and 90s helpless and starving. A good amount are in their 60s to mid 70s and fairly healthy and have no problem standing and walking for a few hours a day. This is part time work, maybe just 10 to 20 hours a week. It's not a career people pickup when they reach a certain age.
Many seniors do this because it gets them out of the house and gives them the opportunity to socialize with all kinds of people. No one's life will be in danger if they make a mistake. They aren't working at a nuclear power plant.
The vast majority of seniors are doing just fine in retirement even if they are not wealthy.
Who works at McDonald's to "get out of the house and socialize"? That's just sad. If that's the reason, they've failed somewhere (seriously failed) in their interpersonal relationships. And you can't convince me that a senior is doing just fine in retirement if he's working at McDonald's. Um....no. That one ain't gonna fly. Sorry. I doubt the vast majority of seniors are doing fine in their retirement because all I hear is "I only have social security to live on" from many of them and also see lots of them in minimum wage jobs. My local Wal Mart is filled with seniors. Also lots of seniors are raising their own grandkids so that's an added expense to their lives.

Fast food work can be grueling and it's not something to do "for fun." No their lives aren't endangered and I never said that. I did point out there are hazards in fast food workplaces and safety risks.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-06-2018, 08:10 AM
 
Location: Winterpeg
882 posts, read 336,293 times
Reputation: 3706
My daughter used to work for a big box hardware store, as a head cashier for a while. She said that in general the best workers were middle-aged. AKA - people who took working seriously and used their paycheques for living.

The high school/university kids (like her) she had to coax away from their phones, if they didn't call in sick. And the retired folks were worse. They used their job as a place to hang out and socialize, and they called in sick or went on holiday a lot.

These are generalizations, of course. My daughter did tell me of awesome retired, helpful, hardworking seniors, and young people. But she noticed patterns after a while.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-06-2018, 08:35 AM
 
Location: Paranoid State
13,047 posts, read 10,439,740 times
Reputation: 15683
I recall a McDonalds near campus on the south side of Chicago in a very poor and economically disadvantaged neighborhood. The teenagers who worked behind the counter interacting with customer and preparing food were almost aggressively slow and purposefully lazy. There was also an 80-something woman who hustled like crazy cleaning tables in the eating area. She was the only one awake. The teenagers would stand around using body language that clearly indicated their boredom and disgust with having to, you know, work. Not that 80-something woman.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-06-2018, 08:49 AM
 
5,430 posts, read 2,827,948 times
Reputation: 10176
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vision67 View Post
Stand all day at Micky Dees for $12 per hour?

No way! I'd rather be dead.
Good grief. Fast food work that requires standing doesn’t necessarily mean all-day shifts.

Could well be half-day shifts—just like what teenagers often work.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-06-2018, 08:56 AM
 
5,430 posts, read 2,827,948 times
Reputation: 10176
Quote:
Originally Posted by StealthRabbit View Post
My experience...
older workers:
1) Better service
2) Actually know something (autoparts / hardware / fabric stores)
3) Think BEYOND the computer terminal... (If the computer does not show the part, an older person is FAR more inclined to look in the stock-room, ask another worker, FIND you an answer)
4) Are easier on delivery vehicles (and safer / less to insure too)
5) Can usually pass a drug test
6) takes the TIME to help you
7) Understands your time (and money) is valuable
8) Can carry on a conversation
9) Has a lot to offer
10) will not HIDE from customers
11) Does not need to be TOLD what to do for every move to make...
12) Can count and read a tape measure
13) Can do math (Divide fractions, calculate %...)
14) Will show up!
15) Will finish serving customer even if they are on a break / quitting time.
Generally, the entire list is soooo so true!

#2 has always been true, IME, with no exceptions. Especially for auto parts, hardware, and fabric!

I tried to rep you more but couldn’t.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-06-2018, 09:13 AM
 
5,430 posts, read 2,827,948 times
Reputation: 10176
Quote:
Originally Posted by PriscillaVanilla View Post
Who works at McDonald's to "get out of the house and socialize"? That's just sad. If that's the reason, they've failed somewhere (seriously failed) in their interpersonal relationships. And you can't convince me that a senior is doing just fine in retirement if he's working at McDonald's. Um....no. That one ain't gonna fly. Sorry. I doubt the vast majority of seniors are doing fine in their retirement because all I hear is "I only have social security to live on" from many of them and also see lots of them in minimum wage jobs. My local Wal Mart is filled with seniors. Also lots of seniors are raising their own grandkids so that's an added expense to their lives.

Fast food work can be grueling and it's not something to do "for fun." No their lives aren't endangered and I never said that. I did point out there are hazards in fast food workplaces and safety risks.
Among the several judgmental, condescending statements you have made, this has got to be the purely nastiest one. What a slap in the face to thousands of decent, friendly servers of all ages.

Has it not occurred to you that some people enjoy meeting STRANGERS and putting a smile on their faces? That no matter how satisfying their “interpersonal relationships,” they consider more social interaction simply added enjoyment? The way you put it, a good personal social life is mutually exclusive with good workplace interactions. YIKES, I really appreciate that there are people who enjoy greeting other people, no matter how trivial the iteraction.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-06-2018, 09:40 AM
 
11,992 posts, read 5,122,573 times
Reputation: 18743
Quote:
Originally Posted by pikabike View Post
Good grief. Fast food work that requires standing doesn’t necessarily mean all-day shifts.

Could well be half-day shifts—just like what teenagers often work.
Also, standing and walking around during the day for a few hours is for most people including seniors a good way to stay healthy. Many people don't realize how much of their day is spent sitting.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-06-2018, 09:43 AM
 
6,314 posts, read 3,576,034 times
Reputation: 22096
I see we have seniors working at our MacDonalds restaurants here. They look friendly and competent.

Our small city is a regional center for mentally challenged adults who are assisted with finding work. We like to eat at Culvers which employs a lot of their clients. I can't get over how well-trained and efficient they are.

I'd like to think that work that makes you feel useful and provides an income is a blessing. Maybe that's from being raised by Depression era parents.

With my daughter being in the restaurant business I could provide a list of ghastly working habits that seem to be common to generational factors. Whatever the cause I do appreciate being served by people who seem to know what they are doing and look as though they like their work.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Retirement
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top