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Old 11-11-2018, 05:48 PM
 
Location: SoCal
13,216 posts, read 6,313,926 times
Reputation: 9827

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mightyqueen801 View Post
Fordham has a good rep and some famous alumni such as Denzel Washington, Vince Lombardi, Alan Alda, Mary Higgins Clark...our current POTUS...

It's one of the Jesuit-run universities.
I didn’t know those famous alumni. My daughter applied to Fordham because it’s in the city, like most kids she was attracted to New York City and living there, and a free application. But they only gave her $20k per year for scholarship. Still much more expensive then our local UC. So she stayed in state.

 
Old 11-11-2018, 06:21 PM
 
Location: Coastal New Jersey
56,026 posts, read 54,537,410 times
Reputation: 66369
Quote:
Originally Posted by NewbieHere View Post
I didnít know those famous alumni. My daughter applied to Fordham because itís in the city, like most kids she was attracted to New York City and living there, and a free application. But they only gave her $20k per year for scholarship. Still much more expensive then our local UC. So she stayed in state.
The Manhattan campus is in a great location--right near Central Park. It didn't work out for her, though. She did much better at UAlbany, which is part of the SUNY system. She's back there now, working on her Masters and PhD.
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Old 11-11-2018, 08:22 PM
 
8,835 posts, read 5,123,147 times
Reputation: 10096
Quote:
Originally Posted by NYgal1542 View Post
This one gave me a good laugh. After my second (and last) child was born I wanted very much to be a stay at home Mom. My mother was for my sisters and me and I am glad she was.

But what does one do when the husband says if you quit your job, I'm going to leave you??

I knew I would need to work to support the kids and me after he left so I made a decision to stay working.

But I would have loved to be a stay at home Mom.

Early 1960s.
Why would it "give you a laugh"? Obviously, each person has their own unique situations and constraints. Some are familial, some are financial, others may be more difficult to overcome, such as ability. Nonetheless, we all make our own choices. That's as it should be, don't you think?
 
Old 11-12-2018, 02:39 AM
 
71,515 posts, read 71,694,121 times
Reputation: 49088
Quote:
Originally Posted by athena53 View Post
Speaking of men vs. women- I found this link interesting- a higher percentage of senior women than men live in poverty regardless of marital history, age range ir race.

https://www.epi.org/publication/wome...erty-than-men/
80% of married men die married. 80% of married women die alone. Not only do the demands of living longer impact women , but married women lose a social security check and file taxes as a single . So there can be harsher financial demands on women as a group since the formerly married ones end up in worse financial shape then even those who were always single and are influencing the numbers of the group.

A lifestyle usually gets backed in to based on what you have so a two income household tends to have higher expenses too. When that second income is gone it can deplete resources faster.

It is like singles adapt through life to make what they have work . Their lifestyle fits the budget all along . But when you are married you tend to have based things on both incomes.

Last edited by mathjak107; 11-12-2018 at 02:48 AM..
 
Old 11-12-2018, 04:10 AM
 
4,432 posts, read 2,608,360 times
Reputation: 10299
Quote:
Originally Posted by mathjak107 View Post
80% of married men die married. 80% of married women die alone. Not only do the demands of living longer impact women , but married women lose a social security check and file taxes as a single . So there can be harsher financial demands on women as a group since the formerly married ones end up in worse financial shape then even those who were always single and are influencing the numbers of the group.

A lifestyle usually gets backed in to based on what you have so a two income household tends to have higher expenses too. When that second income is gone it can deplete resources faster.

It is like singles adapt through life to make what they have work . Their lifestyle fits the budget all along . But when you are married you tend to have based things on both incomes.
This works for me too. I get SSDI, and since im not currently working the allowable part time i was anymore, i certainly rely on my OH s income. If my OH were to die. Id be hard pressed to lead the financial life i have become accustomed to.

Our biggest asset is the house, only half paid for. Id have to rent out the spare bedroom to make it affordable for me to stay, for sure.

We are slowly plodding along towards making sure we will have a retirement that can afford us. Setbacks financially have struck us. Im not working, my OH has one job cutting back on hours, the other is only limited hours....and those hours are at the mercy of the people with special needs my OH works with. My OH and i are looking, but physically im limited, and even part time is hard to find for a handicapped individual. Its become more difficult.

Of course we are only 55 ( me), and will be 60 next year. We know we ( except me) wont be officially "retired" for a long time.

We are ( more slowly than wed like) trying to ensure the other will be taken care of when the time comes...even if we only save $10/week. At least its $10 for that week.

 
Old 11-12-2018, 04:48 AM
 
Location: Central NY
4,662 posts, read 3,239,300 times
Reputation: 11932
Quote:
Originally Posted by Petunia 100 View Post
Why would it "give you a laugh"? Obviously, each person has their own unique situations and constraints. Some are familial, some are financial, others may be more difficult to overcome, such as ability. Nonetheless, we all make our own choices. That's as it should be, don't you think?

Your post, as I read it, sounds like any woman can be a stay at home mother, it's her choice. You made no specifications.

In my case I did not have a choice, in my opinion. Unless I was OK with my husband leaving me if I quit my job. And I knew I would be taking care of the kids. It pretty much put me in a corner.

In my opinion I did not have the luxury of being a stay at home Mom. He took that choice away from me.
 
Old 11-12-2018, 05:38 AM
 
71,515 posts, read 71,694,121 times
Reputation: 49088
Most don’t want to hear it ,but having children is still a personal choice . That “responsible” choice should consider affording them and the work situation.

Yeah ,we all eventually get hit with divorce, job loss or illness , but out of the box when children are being considered there is the work issue to consider .

All the women in our family have their own careers and all have children and work . All their personal choices .

Last edited by mathjak107; 11-12-2018 at 06:14 AM..
 
Old 11-12-2018, 06:05 AM
 
20,545 posts, read 16,619,414 times
Reputation: 38571
Quote:
Originally Posted by ncguy50 View Post
This subject is always going to be contentious and opinionated as people apply their own attitudes and situations to it. But I think it's a valid retirement subject; maybe it should be couched in a more specific thread on senior poverty.

That's all I have.

Cheers!
They always end in the exact same way, people who have made it condemning people who havenít and completely discounting lifeís fortunes and misfortunes as relevant.
 
Old 11-12-2018, 06:14 AM
 
1,257 posts, read 287,773 times
Reputation: 1510
Quote:
Originally Posted by charlygal View Post
To your idea about a thread on senior poverty, are you differentiating that from normal poverty and why?
I make the distinction primarily because the audience here is largely senior or close to being senior. Also, there is a time factor to be considered. Seniors don't have as much time to recover from losses/life changes/disasters, ergo the ongoing discussions about sequence risk, loss of pensions, and of course, retiring on a shoestring. This thread started with an option to deal with a lean retirement and I was interested because I might learn a thing or two about the ups/downs and costs involved with it.

I think a big focus of a retirement board should be a road map to avoiding poverty or dealing with it as gracefully as possible if it can't be avoided.
 
Old 11-12-2018, 06:25 AM
 
Location: The Ozone Layer, apparently...
1,906 posts, read 673,864 times
Reputation: 3955
Quote:
Originally Posted by TwinbrookNine View Post
RV's avoid some of these expenses and property tax too.
This is true. RVing where you move from location to location can be quite the adventure, but with fuel being at about $3.00 a gallon +/- you would need to pace your moves. Private campgrounds can accommodate you with electric and sewer hookups but for 30 days stay would run you between $900.00 and $1200 for a 30 day month +/-. It's easy to see that the average RVer living off a limited fixed income needs to be set up for off-grid boondocking (free camping) for at least a week at a time, if not more.

Then we have other issues. Security. Even a tiny dog makes a great alarm system and priceless companion for anyone RVing alone, but what are you going to do with your beloved pet in an emergency? Dogs are also an expense. My last trip to the vet for my dog's exam, shots and a couple preventatives was a little over $400. Thank goodness that is only once a year but would need to be budgeted for along with the cost of feeding them. Many camping areas, state etc, allow dogs, but need proof of vaccination.

On emergencies themselves, if you need an emergency trip to the hospital, and let's say you have to stay for a week as an inpatient, what happens to your property? Is your RV along with your possessions towed away? Stolen?

As you can see, Ive thought about this a bit. In some states, as long as your home stays on wheels your property can be considered vacation property, and you pay a lower tax rate. It doesn't matter if those wheels eventually degrade and deflate - it just matters that the wheels are there. The largest single wide trailer can qualify as long as you don't remove it from its wheels.

So lets say I buy at least a quarter of an acre of land near a recreation area, dig a well or hook up to city water, put in a septic system and electric box, and get it all set up to hook up to an RV, then I just have to worry about an electric bill and property tax on vacation property. This would require an investment, but I never have to worry about my home being towed away during an emergency. Whatever the property tax is, it wont cost me as much as full hookup camping might. To be able to find a piece of property near a recreational area that is also within 20 minutes of a hospital and shopping would be optimal.

This wouldn't be for everyone, just like RVing itself might not suit everyone's needs, but its something to think about.
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