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Old 11-13-2018, 05:23 AM
 
160 posts, read 89,496 times
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I guess I don't understand what's wrong with a bus tour.

In the past my husband and I were able to create our own travel itinerary...before his illness and go exploring by ourselves. Now that he has health issues I feel better about being on an organized tour. We just came back from a tour (on a bus) in Ireland with extended family.

It was a private tour of family only. There were 12 of us. The youngest was 29 with another 5 in their early 30s...all in excellent health but they came along with us (their parents, aunts & uncles). We all had a great time and it's not something the younger ones would do on their own but I know they enjoyed the trip.
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Old 11-13-2018, 10:03 AM
 
Location: VT; previously MD & NJ
2,214 posts, read 1,354,565 times
Reputation: 6392
Quote:
Originally Posted by bondaroo View Post
I have a very skewed idea of what older people look like, because the ones I'm acquainted with are either spending a lot of time volunteering with animals, or playing hockey. I played today with a group of men and women age mostly 50s to 70s. Active, fun bunch.

I'm "only" 51, mostly in great health. I take no medications other than a nasal spray for allergies. I have played sports my whole life, and an orthopedist I saw after a knee injury said that bodies eventually wear out, that's just how it goes. He sees lots of lifelong jock types coming in for knee and hip replacements. I can imagine that might be me some day, too.

My family mostly lives pretty healthy, then dies of heart disease in their late 70s, and I figure that'll be me as well.
I don't understand this attitude at all. Do you see a doctor regularly? If the doctor prescribed some meds that could prevent or hold off the heart issue for 10 years, would you take the meds? Or would you just assume you will die in your 70s anyway so not bother with the meds?

Let's also remember that the previous generation in our families didn't have access to the same modern medicine we have now. So what happened to them is not necessarily what will happen to us.
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Old 11-13-2018, 10:21 AM
mlb
 
Location: North Monterey County
3,197 posts, read 2,863,927 times
Reputation: 4897
Quote:
Originally Posted by TwinbrookNine View Post
Yes. Once past 70 the odds for cancer drop about 40% and past 75, they drop about 75%.
Wrong.

Case in point - GYN cancers in elderly women - on the increase.

Gynecologic Cancer in the Older Patient: The Activities of the Elderly Working Group of NRG Oncology - The ASCO Post

My mother was 94 and died from endometrial cancer. She had other diagnoses - but this one ended her life.
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Old 11-13-2018, 10:26 AM
 
Location: SoCal
13,297 posts, read 6,362,704 times
Reputation: 9932
Quote:
Originally Posted by mlb View Post
Wrong.

Case in point - GYN cancers in elderly women - on the increase.

Gynecologic Cancer in the Older Patient: The Activities of the Elderly Working Group of NRG Oncology - The ASCO Post

My mother was 94 and died from endometrial cancer. She had other diagnoses - but this one ended her life.
I didn’t read that as you won’t die of cancer at age 94, just the odds increased. So it’s not 0%, but it’s better than 50%.
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Old 11-13-2018, 10:38 AM
 
Location: SW US
2,223 posts, read 2,039,757 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TwinbrookNine View Post
Yes. Once past 70 the odds for cancer drop about 40% and past 75, they drop about 75%.

Can you cite a source for this information? It doesn't sound right to me.
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Old 11-13-2018, 10:42 AM
 
Location: NC Piedmont
3,911 posts, read 2,883,191 times
Reputation: 6291
Quote:
Originally Posted by ansible90 View Post
I don't understand this attitude at all. Do you see a doctor regularly? If the doctor prescribed some meds that could prevent or hold off the heart issue for 10 years, would you take the meds? Or would you just assume you will die in your 70s anyway so not bother with the meds?

Let's also remember that the previous generation in our families didn't have access to the same modern medicine we have now. So what happened to them is not necessarily what will happen to us.
A lot of studies in the last few years indicate that while heredity is a major factor in heart health, it is not as significant as previously believed. There are some rare conditions that are hereditary and there is pretty good likelihood that someone who has the condition may be able to manage it but not overcome it. Premature death from a heart attack without a diagnosed heart condition happens to a minority of people. Those at greater risk due to hereditary factors do have an increased risk but it usually isn't enough to make it likely that they will die prematurely from a heart attack without other factors. That last part is really hard to nail down, but when they apply the statistics from the general population of increased risk from other factors like obesity and smoking, the additional risk from hereditary factors is adjusted down. There is a lot "inherited lifestyle" that isn't genetic. Children of smokers are more likely to be smokers than children of non smokers. Same with obesity. It can be something of a self fulfilling prophecy when each generation does nothing more than the prior generation did to attempt to prevent it.
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Old 11-13-2018, 01:50 PM
 
Location: Winterpeg
883 posts, read 337,845 times
Reputation: 3711
Quote:
Originally Posted by ansible90 View Post
I don't understand this attitude at all. Do you see a doctor regularly? If the doctor prescribed some meds that could prevent or hold off the heart issue for 10 years, would you take the meds? Or would you just assume you will die in your 70s anyway so not bother with the meds?

Let's also remember that the previous generation in our families didn't have access to the same modern medicine we have now. So what happened to them is not necessarily what will happen to us.
What? Holy projection, Batman. lol

I absolutely take care of my own health. I have never smoked, I don't drink, I exercise, play sports and work an active job. Could work on my diet some, but hey - no one's perfect! Given that not a single person in my biological family, for many generations back, has lived far into their 80s, I'm just not thinking I'm going to be the outlier. That's all. It's not a big part of my life, not a worry, not a fatalistic wish. I don't typically dwell on my mortality.
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Old 11-13-2018, 03:14 PM
mlb
 
Location: North Monterey County
3,197 posts, read 2,863,927 times
Reputation: 4897
Quote:
Originally Posted by NewbieHere View Post
I didnít read that as you wonít die of cancer at age 94, just the odds increased. So itís not 0%, but itís better than 50%.

Those GYN cancers are increasing in post-menopausal women in their 50's and up.
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Old 11-13-2018, 03:22 PM
 
5,431 posts, read 3,458,283 times
Reputation: 13714
Quote:
Originally Posted by Windwalker2 View Post

Can you cite a source for this information? It doesn't sound right to me.
"Age is the biggest single risk factor for cancer. Risk increases significantly after age 50, and half of all cancers occur at age 66 and above. According to the National Cancer Institute, one quarter of new cancer diagnoses are in people aged 65 to 74." Jun 23, 2016
Why Does Cancer Risk Increase As We Get Older?
https://blog.dana-farber.org/insight...-we-get-older/

"Scientists have known for years that age is a leading risk factor for the development of many types of cancer, but why aging increases cancer risk remains unclear. Researchers suspect that DNA methylation, or the binding of chemical tags, called methyl groups, onto DNA, may be involved."
Monday, February 3, 2014
NIH study offers insight into why cancer incidence increases with age
https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news...-increases-age
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Old 11-13-2018, 05:28 PM
 
Location: Northern panhandle WV
3,007 posts, read 2,176,472 times
Reputation: 6696
Quote:
Originally Posted by mlb View Post
Just an observation - for those of you who are starting to have balance issues - PLEASE take a "fall" class.

Learn how to fall so that you protect yourself against breaks.

If you're getting older, you'd better learn how to fall - StarTribune.com
A fall class will not help you if your body just suddenly stops working and you go down without ability to control any part of your body.
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