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Old 11-11-2018, 09:36 AM
 
Location: Planet Woof
3,139 posts, read 3,510,190 times
Reputation: 9889

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Quote:
Originally Posted by NoMoreSnowForMe View Post
I'm 62 and last year I thought I was getting dementia. I felt really old, was losing my ability to remember things, felt tired all the time -basically felt 20 years older than I should have.

I decided to change my diet and become vegan, and cold turkey quit all of the medications I was on - high blood pressure, high cholesterol (steroids), reflux, depression/anxiety medications.

I told my doctor that I couldn't tell which side-effects were what, and what was caused by medications or my age. That I was going to quit everything cold turkey (I had no heart disease), and see what life felt like without any medications.

And I became vegan to help my cholesterol and high blood pressure, to see if my diet might fix that.

And I started walking about 20 minutes every day.

After 6 months, my blood pressure was normal. My blood sugar was normal. My cholesterol is still high, but I'm not worried about it, since all of my blood tests for everything, including kidney, liver, etc., and blood pressure are normal. I no longer have any reflux issues or indigestion issues.

I honestly believe that the reason so many seniors are so sick - is because of the medications that are pushed on us. The British standards for instance, of when they prescribe high blood pressure and cholesterol medications, are much different than ours. They don't prescribe medications until they are definitely needed, because their health care system is paid for by the government. So, they are cost -conscious, which means they have figured out when people really actually need medications.

In the US, the numbers keep going down that are the determinants for when people are supposedly in need of drugs. For instance, the number for supposedly needing cholesterol medications used to be when your cholesterol was say, at 200. Then, it was decided that you needed meds at 180, then 150, etc. (just as an example).

And the reason is, because if the AMA says you need meds when your cholesterol is at 180, then the drug companies can sell more steroids for cholesterol control.

If you look at the studies for cholesterol, there is actually no real evidence that a lower cholesterol level protects anyone from heart disease. Many people who have heart attacks have low cholesterol levels.

Anyway, I really believe it's all of the medications that are pushed on people now, that makes them old before their time. The drug industry profits when we're sick. They don't really want us to get better.

So, I'm really not surprised that you are seeing people who are old before their time, and are over-medicated. The medical system in America is based on giving people drugs. The doctors are over-worked and taught in medical school to figure out what drug to give people and move on quickly to the next patient.

When was the last time your doctor asked you about your nutrition? Yeah, never.

You have to be pro-active. My doctor was very adamant that I should absolutely NOT go off of all of my medications, and I told her I was going to do it and I wanted her to simply approve blood tests for me every 3 months to see how I was doing. She agreed to that for almost a year, then started arguing that blood tests were not needed that often, and still trying to get me back onto drugs. I changed doctors.

You have to be really assertive in our medical system environment, if you want to try to change your health problems with lifestyle and nutrition. That requires more effort for them, and they aren't trained for that.

I have found that Indian doctors are way better as far as being willing to work with me in treating my problems in a different way, with more natural ways. Indian doctors naturally look at the whole person. I highly recommend looking for an Indian primary care provider, if you want to look for non-traditional options. I have found them to be much more open and receptive to non-traditional options than most American medically-trained doctors. Even if the Indian doctors were trained here - their culture is different, and much better as far as listening and being open to other remedies than just prescribing drugs.
I agree 100 percent with your analysis. This comes from a 20+ career in healthcare working with older adults.
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Old 11-11-2018, 09:46 AM
mlb
 
Location: North Monterey County
3,181 posts, read 2,857,897 times
Reputation: 4878
Just turned 65 - and applied and accepted to a Medicare Advantage plan because my health is really very good. No meds, no chronic ailments..... just a blip on the screen with a fractured ankle - my first broken bone.

The key is MOVEMENT. And having a history of it. I am not an athlete - but since my mid-30's I have pushed myself to the gym 2-3 times. a week. In the last 15 years we have had dogs - mostly as companion - but also to get us moving in other ways.

I have had coworkers astonished that I would go to the gym so often when I was working. They will find out soon why. Sedentary living will make you sick.

I do have a family history of diabetes, stroke, and respiratory ailments. I have NOT fallen into that gene pool yet - and I hope once my ankle heals I can get back up on that horse to prevent it from happening.

My spouse, however, is 2.5 years younger than I and has a bad back. He does not do any regular exercise. It shows.

He will need a Medicare Supplement program ($$) because high cholestrol and medications to ward off neuro/back pain. His parents actually lived into their 90s so it will be interesting to see how the rest of his life packs out.

Movement and Attitude and what you put into your mouth. THOSE are the greatest determinants of your future health.
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Old 11-11-2018, 09:57 AM
 
Location: SoCal
13,235 posts, read 6,340,776 times
Reputation: 9854
I don’t even sit more than 2 hours. Find reason to get up. Even for just restroom break. With all the electronics toys and whatsnot, it’s easy to laze about. Move it or lose it is my motto.

Last edited by NewbieHere; 11-11-2018 at 11:12 AM..
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Old 11-11-2018, 10:09 AM
 
6,316 posts, read 3,579,899 times
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I worked in the health field and am a strong believer in keeping things in balance - the wholistic approach of tending body, mind and spirit. I know for a fact that good mental health practice improves my physical health and vice versa.

Also I am my own best advocate. Never take for granted that Dr. X knows what Dr. Y is doing. It's extra work and they probably think I'm a nuisance but I keep all my practitioners on the same page because communication gaps or errors can make a big difference in your health care.

I try to keep my medications to a minimum and find alternative ways to accomplish medical goals if they are available to me.

My physical health is way better than I deserve for all the bad habits I've had to let go of over the years and I'm grateful for the good "genetics" I was born with. Positivity and gratitude for what I have are good medicine for me.

I spend time also anticipating reasonable expectations for the future and thinking about ways to accept and adjust to inevitable decline. Why now when my health is good? Because I don't want to be blindsided with no emotional tools to handle a new situation.

Here's my mindset: I'll probably spend a lot of time alone in bed with myself before I die and I really, really want that person to be a pleasant companion.
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Old 11-11-2018, 10:26 AM
 
Location: Southern California
23,789 posts, read 8,278,461 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bette View Post
No medications but I need to lose more weight, keep moving, put down the fork and improve my posture.

The posture has been a life long problem and I hate it. It's just because of my vision - hard for me to see so I've bent over most of my life.

However, working on a computer is easier than the old typewriter days and studying.

I would love some suggestions on how to improve the posture. My husband and his dad have the best posture and they are both over 6 feet. (My FIL passed away last year but up until a couple of weeks before he passed, perfect posture).

I'm walking 3 miles a day; hoping to make it 4 soon. At first, it was hard and now, I need to add more to it.
Just to be aware of your posture and correcting your position as I'm doing right now sitting at computer. Straightening back even working with Therabands for stretching. Don't know if you are getting enough magnesium but that is something to be aware of too. I have pretty good posture for my years. I take a good amount of magnesium daily and have been for years.

I'd be very happy with 3 miles daily. Due to advanced OA walking distances is out of the picture for me and if that will ever change, don't know.
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Old 11-11-2018, 10:29 AM
 
Location: SW Florida
9,759 posts, read 7,041,256 times
Reputation: 14295
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lodestar View Post
I worked in the health field and am a strong believer in keeping things in balance - the wholistic approach of tending body, mind and spirit. I know for a fact that good mental health practice improves my physical health and vice versa.

Also I am my own best advocate. Never take for granted that Dr. X knows what Dr. Y is doing. It's extra work and they probably think I'm a nuisance but I keep all my practitioners on the same page because communication gaps or errors can make a big difference in your health care.

I try to keep my medications to a minimum and find alternative ways to accomplish medical goals if they are available to me.

My physical health is way better than I deserve for all the bad habits I've had to let go of over the years and I'm grateful for the good "genetics" I was born with. Positivity and gratitude for what I have are good medicine for me.

I spend time also anticipating reasonable expectations for the future and thinking about ways to accept and adjust to inevitable decline. Why now when my health is good? Because I don't want to be blindsided with no emotional tools to handle a new situation.

Here's my mindset: I'll probably spend a lot of time alone in bed with myself before I die and I really, really want that person to be a pleasant companion.
This, absolutely!!! ^^^^^

IMO the mentality you express here regarding your health and general welfare (and life in general, I suspect), serves one well regardless of whether he/she maintains perfect health or has a few of those chronic condition (or whatever) or illness monkeys on his/her back to contend with.

Maintaining, as you can, a positive attitude (as well as a generous sense of humor) makes handling those health issues (and everything else) a whole lot easier, IMO.
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Old 11-11-2018, 10:29 AM
 
12,705 posts, read 14,085,285 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by athena53 View Post
Really good point. I have pictures of my grandmothers when they were my age (or younger). They were nice ladies with ample, fluffy waists and sensible shoes. They did not swim, bicycle, snorkel or paddle a kayak. I don't know if my paternal grandmother EVER did any of that although my maternal grandmother did know how to swim. Our notions of what older (>40!) people can do has changed drastically and sometimes I wonder what my grandmothers would think about my 20+-mile bike rides and my competing in 5Ks and in 250-meter swims at age 65. I'm VERY glad those perceptions have changed.
Something else to consider though, when I was a youngster there was no compulsion for middle aged men and women to look like they were anything other than that. The endless youth obsession wasn't there, except for the occasional painted, loudly dressed and often more than slight "tetched" individual.

Yes, we engage in activities now that enhance and preserve our health, which is good. But we are a culture in massive denial of ageing. The repeated threads on C-D that amount to group hissy-fits about the words "old" and any other word that implies an aged person are pathetic evidence of this folly.
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Old 11-11-2018, 10:48 AM
 
Location: Southern California
23,789 posts, read 8,278,461 times
Reputation: 15496
On the fear of cholesterol issue, there are quite a lot of info links on the Importance of Cholesterol, check them out.
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Old 11-11-2018, 10:55 AM
 
Location: State of Transition
78,755 posts, read 70,607,687 times
Reputation: 76724
OP, do you really find the 60-somethings to be that infirm, or over-medicated, or do the groups skew more to the older ones? I have a hard time believing that 60-somethings would be in such bad shape, as a group. IDK, if I were to accept your observations on face value, I might start speculating about the Midwestern diet and lifestyle. Very starchy diet, perhaps with more of a tendency toward sedentarism outside of work hours. IDK.

My experience with older generations of family members is pretty much like yours. Even people who didn't exercise maintained a healthy weight, and stayed mobile and healthy, and largely unmedicated, and mentally sharp, except for a case of hereditary dementia on one side of the family. Most oldsters in my extended family lived to their mid-90's, and were relatively active and lucid to the end.
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Old 11-11-2018, 11:03 AM
 
6,625 posts, read 3,752,330 times
Reputation: 13703
64. Excellent health. Better lab work than 30 years ago. No hbp, cholesterol, diabetes, etc. My weight is in normal range (I'd like to lose 7 lbs, but I weigh the same as I have for decades...I fluctuate 7 lbs).

My father is 86 and still in good health. He's slightly bent over, but takes care of his half acre yard by himself and does house projects. His brain is sharp, except sometimes he forgets he called. But hey, everyone does that sometimes. I take after him, so maybe I'll still be in good shape at that age. His two brothers died of heart attack before age 50; they had unhealthy lifestyles.

I have osteoarthritis to a mild degree. I get low back pain sometimes, and just general aches & pains to a mild degree. I have always been forgetful, but now I am more so. Otherwise, I'm not much different than I was years ago.

I did notice a difference in physical condition once I hit 60. Time takes its toll.

My skin is losing its elasticity. I use all the creams and such, but time marches on. My chubby cheeks (on my face) have fallen...inevitable. This is the curse of being chubby cheeked. Like Angela Lansbury & Paul McCartney, chubby-cheeked people whose cheeks fell at a young age. I think I look my age, but I still do get mistaken for much younger. So maybe the care I take does pay off, or maybe it's genetics.

I intentionally try to live a healthy lifestyle. My eating habits are pretty healthy, compared to others. I walk almost every day, but not far or fast. The regularity of it seems to have an impact. I do resistance exercises and a bit of yoga at home, but nothing drastic or near what I used to do years ago.

Lady at end of street is my age. Married to a much older man. They both mow their yards with riding mower, take care of their numerous trees & landscaping. Very active. She seems healthy as a horse, but I wouldn't know if she has health problems. She is overweight, but not what I'd call fat. I haven't seen him enough to notice, but I think he has health problems. He's in his late 70s I think.

I know three men at about age 66. All three have diabetes type 2 (which is caused by lifestyle) and take medications. Two are too overweight for good health; the third is within the norm but has a chunky belly (beer?). All three have problems with physical activity...bad knees or whatever. They're not in great shape, I'd say. One has had a bypass operation already.

It seems as if lifestyle is very important, as the doctors tell us. But there is also genetics.
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