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View Poll Results: For those who are certain they are going to work in retirement -OR- are working. Why? How often? Che
For the $$ 20 31.25%
For the benefits 5 7.81%
Because I love my current job 6 9.38%
It's a hobby I enjoy AND I earn $$ too!! 10 15.63%
I want to, or have, started working a different line of work or new business owner 9 14.06%
I will stop working but do a small side gig 14 21.88%
I don't believe in the concept of retirement while still able bodied 6 9.38%
I cannot imagine not working 10 15.63%
I do not like being at home with my family and or spouse all the time 4 6.25%
Spouse wants me to keep working 5 7.81%
Job involves travel or residing somewhere else aJob keeps me in good physical shape while earning $ 1 1.56%
I will likely or do, work 10 hrs or less a week 3 4.69%
I will likely or do, work 11-16 hrs or less a week 9 14.06%
I will likely or do, work 16-20 hrs or less a week 10 15.63%
I will likely or do, work 21-25 hrs or less a week 7 10.94%
I will likely or do, work 26-30 hrs or less a week 1 1.56%
I will likely or do, work 30-35 hrs or less a week 2 3.13%
I will likely or do, work 36-40 hrs or less a week 3 4.69%
I am poor living in a less than desirable enviornment. The work enviornment is more appealing 0 0%
I will continue working because I really have no life 3 4.69%
Other 11 17.19%
Multiple Choice Poll. Voters: 64. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 11-17-2018, 10:23 AM
 
3,764 posts, read 3,505,826 times
Reputation: 8938

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Quote:
Originally Posted by ansible90 View Post
So sell one house and pay off the other one to live in. Why do you have 2 houses? Seems like an extra expense you don't need.
We lived in the one out west until I got a job offer back East. We decided to rent it out rather than sell, because the mortgage was underwater during the '09 crash, and have been lucky to have a good, reliable tenant these past seven years.

Luckily, it's no longer under water and we could probably sell it for nearly what we paid. Which is about 1/3 of what our current house cost.

At this point... probably will just keep the 2nd house, as long as we can keep it well rented, with a decent management company doing all the work. In retirement, it will be a bit of rental income, once the mortgage is paid down.
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Old 11-18-2018, 09:47 AM
 
Location: Columbia SC
8,984 posts, read 7,753,935 times
Reputation: 12191
Wife and I retired at age 62 and relocated south. After about 2 years we both got a bit bored. We also realized we could continue funding IRA's if we had earned income. We both went back to work part time. She did it for about 3 years, I did it for 5 years. A more relaxed attitude when you do not have to work meaning you can walk away from it anytime.
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Old 11-18-2018, 04:45 PM
 
Location: Grove City, Ohio
10,135 posts, read 12,392,750 times
Reputation: 13985
Quote:
Originally Posted by johngolf View Post
Wife and I retired at age 62 and relocated south. After about 2 years we both got a bit bored. We also realized we could continue funding IRA's if we had earned income. We both went back to work part time. She did it for about 3 years, I did it for 5 years. A more relaxed attitude when you do not have to work meaning you can walk away from it anytime.
At 70 I am still working full time because I like what I do. For me work is fun and the second it stops being fun you can color me gone!
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Old 11-23-2018, 09:38 AM
 
Location: Coastal New Jersey
56,139 posts, read 54,613,656 times
Reputation: 66539
Quote:
Originally Posted by BumbleBeeHunter View Post
I'd like to know where you can work for 12+ hrs per week as MightyQueen posted.

My job with a vendor of the state will likely only last as long as the client I spend midnight-6am with is alive. And it's the time I finally get to sleep in a 40+ hr shift.

Just curious, if mightyqueen wants/can disclose the info. Thanks
Just saw this.

I work for a small engineering firm doing business development. Basically, I attend public-sector-related engineering industry events (mostly in the NYC area but also occasional state events in Albany, NY) and make connections and introductions for the firm for teaming on future projects.

They would be happy if I worked more hours, but are OK with me working when I am available. When he asked me to work for him, my current boss said, "You know a lot of people, plus you are tall, so people remember you." After a 37-year career with a public transportation agency, that's what all my knowledge and experience boiled down to. I know a lot of people, and I am tall.
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Old 11-23-2018, 09:41 AM
 
197 posts, read 161,044 times
Reputation: 1122
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mightyqueen801 View Post
Just saw this.

I work for a small engineering firm doing business development. Basically, I attend public-sector-related engineering industry events (mostly in the NYC area but also occasional state events in Albany, NY) and make connections and introductions for the firm for teaming on future projects.

They would be happy if I worked more hours, but are OK with me working when I am available. When he asked me to work for him, my current boss said, "You know a lot of people, plus you are tall, so people remember you." After a 37-year career with a public transportation agency, that's what all my knowledge and experience boiled down to. I know a lot of people, and I am tall.
Judging by your posts you are also intelligent and articulate and that is what they remember!
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Old 11-23-2018, 09:05 PM
 
1,590 posts, read 820,001 times
Reputation: 2590
Quote:
Originally Posted by LaJollaEast View Post
The most interesting thing about responses to this question is the variety of answers. Retirement is not the same today as it was for many of our parents and grandparents. It is not a one size fits all for everyone. I hope everyone gets to have the retirement they want whether they continue to work at some capacity or stop all together.
I'm not sure if someone has already mentioned this, but I will. Retirement, traditionally, was VERY insecure. It really didn't exist. If you planned well, and had a bunch of kids, who were responsible and didn't go off on a hare, you would have your children to take care of you in your old age. The WHOLE reason Social Security got started was because so many elderly were living in poverty and with no one and nothing to care for them.

The foundation of that idea that your kids would take care of you is based on an agrarian economy. Farms. Jobs and businesses based on farms. Technology changed all that. By the time FDR rolled around, "retirement" was a hobgoblin of risk and chance, and not so many people were doing well.

Once SS was established, and there was a public recognition that we needed to do something as a society, things started to change. Unions caught the ball, and REAL retirement plans began to be commonplace. Non-union biz offered competitive plans to get the employees.

So, retirement, as a concept where you turn 65 and just punch the time-clock on your last day, then go fishing forevermore - is a fiction - but is also fairly recent - historically.

So, yeah, retirement today is not the same as it was for our parents and grandparents. I've come to that same conclusion. What it is, is closer to what our greats, or great-greats, would have known. Insecurity, worry, and doubt. However, the time when it was "one-size-fits-all" lasted about 30 years. That was the peak of union power days.

Unless you lived in Japan, where the culture is VERY different. And very few Americans would tolerate the way the Japanese culture put you in a box. But they did pretty much guarantee their elderly were taken care of.

If you examine history (since the Industrial Revolution), and the evolution of work, wages, retirement, the whole bit, I don't think you can come to any conclusion other than that unions were needed, and unions created a middle class. Before the Industrial Rev, you had a middle class - but the IR essentially was making it disappear. Unions changed that. They saved lives, and retirements.

Unions were only one factor, but if you look at the last 40 years, and the anti-union bias that has been touted, encouraged, and sold (since Reagan), you can't help but notice. As the unions have gotten weaker, the wage difference, top to bottom, has gotten more extreme. Differences that were 12x 50 years ago are now 1200x. It's insane. But politicians keep selling the line, appealing to natural fears and biases.

That's enough of all that tho. Make that long story short - yeah - retirement is different today. And if you ever wonder why, and then LOOK at history, you'll realize it doesn't have to be that way. But it is, because certain parties are willing to lie and bend any truth to enhance THEIR power and influence.

What blows me away is the willingness of so many to believe them. In spite of history.
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Old 11-23-2018, 09:49 PM
 
Location: San Diego
1,085 posts, read 714,608 times
Reputation: 1350
Haven't worked in 4 years and I never thought I would say this but, I'm ready to go back.

We have money but it just feels wrong spending it down after saving for so long, plus I'm bored. My only problem is, I need to come up with a new idea. The old way was risky and at times very stressful.
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Old 11-24-2018, 08:05 AM
 
Location: Fort Lauderdale, FL
600 posts, read 161,427 times
Reputation: 912
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nov3 View Post
No choice really. The stock market tanked two of my investments I was set to use in retirement. Lesson learned. Now I get to live paycheck to paycheck til I get fired or found without a pulse.
Some of us don't get to plan the golden years...they just don't exist. Work work work.
There's no doubt I'm angry about not being able to have a retirement...it's completely my fault that I followed the sheep and had money managed by Fidelity. Who knew that twice the market would dip soooo low.! I do believe in saving but investing...what a joke.
I learned that lesson as well: Fidelity, UBS, Merrill... crooks, all of them! They all take advantage of financially ignorant people, especially older folks, and sell their "Financial Products" that get them the most commission. Lowest of low - no better than used-car salesman in my book.

Luckily I had opened an account with only part, albeit several hundred K of my investable assets. The rest I continued to personally manage in an E-Trade account. And when that account consistently out-performed the so-called professionals by double digits, I went to their office to close my account.

My salesperson, to intimidate me, passed me on to his supervisor, then the manager, until finally I was on the top floor and spoke to the partner. By that time I was livid. I think just about every employee and customer in the entire office heard what I had to say to him: "Why am I paying you a good percentage of my money to manage my account to lose money when the market is at an all-time high? Is it just so you can wear your Gucci suits, sit in a mahogany-paneled and marble-tiled office in the penthouse?"

He asked me to calm down and offered to refund an entire year of management fees!
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Old 11-24-2018, 09:21 AM
Status: "How long till Fall?" (set 1 day ago)
 
Location: Where my bills arrive
8,140 posts, read 9,576,422 times
Reputation: 8169
Not retired yet but close, I plan on working part time at Lowes. As a relationship my wife and I have always gotten along better when our day includes quality time apart, its what works for us 37+ years now.
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