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Old 11-14-2018, 08:52 AM
 
71,855 posts, read 71,942,576 times
Reputation: 49413

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Blind Cleric View Post
The poster said that if they could sleep more, they wouldn't have to exercise as much. Not good advice.

Also, they expressed a desire for 10-12 hours of sleep. Well, too much sleep can actually be deleterious to health. https://www.amerisleep.com/blog/over...ealth-effects/
Don’t bother explaining , jasper just follows my posts around and posts his zingers . It rarely has anything to do with the topic nor does he obviously read the posts before commenting .
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Old 11-14-2018, 08:53 AM
 
2,446 posts, read 2,079,049 times
Reputation: 5706
Quote:
Originally Posted by Serious Conversation View Post
If you're training fairly hard, sleep is critical to gains, and restoring damage done to the muscles through training.
Great point but I'm sure it will be rebuffed by the keyboard fitness experts.
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Old 11-14-2018, 08:55 AM
 
2,446 posts, read 2,079,049 times
Reputation: 5706
Quote:
Originally Posted by mathjak107 View Post
Donít bother explaining , jasper just follows my posts around and posts his zingers . It rarely has anything to do with the topic nor does he obviously read the posts before commenting .
LOL lol
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Old 11-14-2018, 08:55 AM
 
71,855 posts, read 71,942,576 times
Reputation: 49413
Quote:
Originally Posted by Serious Conversation View Post
If you're training fairly hard, sleep is critical to gains, and restoring damage done to the muscles through training.
No one would ever dispute that . The poster tried to tell us sleep is a replacement for exercising which is laughable .
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Old 11-14-2018, 09:17 AM
 
Location: The South
5,251 posts, read 3,649,924 times
Reputation: 7951
Quote:
Originally Posted by SportyandMisty View Post
One thing to consider: that artificial knee will wear out with use. The operation to replace it with yet another artificial knee is a *****. By doing the TKR early, you will be faced with another operation when you're really quite elderly. Doing a TKR when you are 65, for example, means probably doing another one when you are 80 once the first has worn out.
That is true, but the OP is 72.
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Old 11-14-2018, 09:24 AM
 
Location: SoCal
13,323 posts, read 6,375,629 times
Reputation: 9952
I’m glad I put somebody on ignore list. I don’t see the stupid comments.
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Old 11-14-2018, 09:26 AM
 
Location: Williamsburg, VA
3,551 posts, read 1,666,493 times
Reputation: 10174
The solution is clear, take Ambien and then you'll start sleepwalking and get the benefits of both sleep AND exercise.




(just kidding, in case anyone is wondering.....)
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Old 11-14-2018, 10:03 AM
 
2,446 posts, read 2,079,049 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NewbieHere View Post
Iím glad I put somebody on ignore list. I donít see the stupid comments.
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Old 11-14-2018, 10:19 AM
 
Location: Central IL
15,253 posts, read 8,568,509 times
Reputation: 35698
Quote:
Originally Posted by SportyandMisty View Post
Regarding building muscle mass for seniors:

https://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2016/...-after-age-60/



He goes on: "The key," he continues, "is regular and progressive weight training."
Quote:
Originally Posted by jrkliny View Post
Bull Hockey! He also states: "You can rebuild them, even if you are middle-aged or older." Middle aged is one thing, 70s and 80s is quite different as has been documented in lots of studies.
Did you read the entire abstract?

Resistance training (RT) is a proven sarcopenia countermeasure with a high degree of potency. However, sustainability remains a major issue that could limit the appeal of RT as a therapeutic approach without well-defined dosing requirements to maintain gains.

PURPOSE:
To test the efficacy of two maintenance prescriptions on muscle mass, myofiber size and type distribution, and strength. We hypothesized the minimum dose required to maintain RT-induced adaptations would be greater in the old (60-75 yr) versus young (20-35 yr).
...
CONCLUSIONS:
We conclude that older adults require a higher dose of weekly loading than the young to maintain myofiber hypertrophy attained during a progressive RT program, yet gains in specific strength among older adults were well preserved and remained at or above levels of the untrained young.


The gains were achieved with a training regimen that was then followed by maintenance at 1/3 or 1/9 the training level. The fact that there were GAINS that could then be maintained seems to make the point you're speaking of. And the participants ranged in age up to 75.

What exactly is your beef? That you are 72 and are only now realizing it is harder to keep in the shape you desire compared to your 50's? There aren't many things that get easier as you get older...

I suggest you get a trainer and take it from there.
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Old 11-14-2018, 10:33 AM
 
5,470 posts, read 2,852,473 times
Reputation: 10286
Quote:
Originally Posted by jrkliny View Post
I am sure there are a few. I belong to an organization with over 1000 retirees. Most of them in their 80s are not doing well at all. Unfortunately the death toll is all but constant. In addition to losing strength and abilities, the life insurance tables tell a sad, sad tale. How old are you and how long do you expect to live?
Maybe it is a good thing I do not belong to a retiree organization. Wouldn’t want to think that a defeatist attitude is OK, at any age.

Averages don’t mean much to an individual who lives differently from “average.”

I am old enough to tell I don’t have the strength I had in my 20s but young enough to keep doing what I have always done...exercise as an essential part of my day. The exact age is irrelevant, not to mention NOYB.

I could drop dead tomorrow. Or not. I am not going to stop doing what I do because the “average” person of my age doesn’t live the same way. People always mistake me for being decades younger than I am, so I don’t intend to sit around all day and feel old.
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