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Old 11-17-2018, 01:13 PM
 
2,446 posts, read 2,077,630 times
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After watching the movie Pacific Heights with Matthew Modine and Michael Keaton, I decide being a landlord was not for me. Obviously the movie is an exaggeration but....
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Old 11-17-2018, 01:49 PM
 
8,980 posts, read 8,125,611 times
Reputation: 19502
Quote:
Originally Posted by Serious Conversation View Post
I’d rather have seniors or cats in the apartment than kids or dogs!
Most landlords will not allow cats, because a lot of them urinate all over the apartment/house and t stinks so bad no one wants to rent the unit any more.

I know of one apartment house of over 20 units in Florida, where so many cats had lived in it over the years, it smelt so bad that it was impossible to rent. It went for sale at an auction, and a Realtor from Florida I knew, bought it for about 20% of normal value. He was the only bidder, and his first bid was the only one.

He renamed it The Cat House, and only rented to little old ladies my own age now, and every one had to have at least one cat. He figured that cat owners do not smell the cat smell. He has a gold mine. It is almost impossible for those older ladies with cats to find anyone that will rent to them with their cats. Within 6 months he had a 2 year waiting list to even get into the apartments. They only call him if there is a major problem, which he immediately sends over his handy man to make repairs.

Results: He owns a cash cow as they say, bringing in a good solid steady income. The ladies take care of the units, as they don't want to lose their rentals. One dies or moves out to a nursing home, etc. one day, and by the next day the unit is cleaned up and ready for rent with a waiting list it takes about 1 or 2 calls to rent it back up, so very little lost rent. I have not seen him for 25 years and as he was 10 years older than I am, I have no idea if he is still alive, and do not know if there is a new owner they have kept The Cat House as it was.
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Old 11-17-2018, 06:28 PM
 
Location: Ohio
19,953 posts, read 14,260,675 times
Reputation: 16133
Quote:
Originally Posted by HappyDogToday View Post
I have done nothing but rent either a house or an apartment all my life. I am currently on my 7th lease where I am presently and really like where I am, but was curious about another complex for next year. I had always liked their setting and location so decided to stop by their office to learn more about price, etc.

What I learned was very different than what I expected. Maybe even subtle discrimination against retirees.

The rent for a one bedroom was the same as where I am but the deposits and application process were unreasonable, in my opinion.

They had a 2 pet limit (typical) and wanted $250 non-refundable deposit per pet, plus $30 per pet per month.

They wanted 3 times the monthly rent up front plus a $600 security deposit! They wanted a year's worth of pay stubs. They would not take a Social Security statement, bank statements, or tax returns as income proof. Plus credit checks, of course.

I am on SS plus self employed with a regular monthly income but their rules left me out in the cold plus the security and pet deposits being what they were.

It would cost almost $3800 in deposits just to get in a $750 a month apartment. That is insane plus the subtle implication the SS wasn't "real" income.

I am not unfamiliar with some of the stringent demands on renting now, but this was ridiculous. Thinkiing of moving? Get all your info first. It is not as easy as it was 10 years ago.

Guess I will stay where I am at for a very long time.
By "their rules" I assume you mean a property management company for an apartment complex, and not a standard 4-24 family apartment block owned by a private owner.

I personally find their requirements a little excessive.

I would pay a $250 non-refundable deposit for pets or $30 extra per month, but not both.

You do realize you are allowed to negotiate rent prices, right?

I have never paid the asking price for rents. Of course, I always talk to tenants, who'll will tell you things off-handedly, like a particular unit has been vacant for 8-12 months. Knowing little things like that is a good negotiating tool. I've also paid cash-up-front, and I do mean cash and not check or credit/debit card for reduced rent.

If you feel you've been discriminated against, Google is your friend. There's an office in your community that investigates such complaints, and they'll send several people of differing situations to check it out, and if it is age-based discrimination, you might profit off of that.
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Old 11-17-2018, 06:48 PM
 
Location: Tennessee
23,650 posts, read 17,623,979 times
Reputation: 27733
Quote:
Originally Posted by oldtrader View Post
Most landlords will not allow cats, because a lot of them urinate all over the apartment/house and t stinks so bad no one wants to rent the unit any more.

I know of one apartment house of over 20 units in Florida, where so many cats had lived in it over the years, it smelt so bad that it was impossible to rent. It went for sale at an auction, and a Realtor from Florida I knew, bought it for about 20% of normal value. He was the only bidder, and his first bid was the only one.

He renamed it The Cat House, and only rented to little old ladies my own age now, and every one had to have at least one cat. He figured that cat owners do not smell the cat smell. He has a gold mine. It is almost impossible for those older ladies with cats to find anyone that will rent to them with their cats. Within 6 months he had a 2 year waiting list to even get into the apartments. They only call him if there is a major problem, which he immediately sends over his handy man to make repairs.

Results: He owns a cash cow as they say, bringing in a good solid steady income. The ladies take care of the units, as they don't want to lose their rentals. One dies or moves out to a nursing home, etc. one day, and by the next day the unit is cleaned up and ready for rent with a waiting list it takes about 1 or 2 calls to rent it back up, so very little lost rent. I have not seen him for 25 years and as he was 10 years older than I am, I have no idea if he is still alive, and do not know if there is a new owner they have kept The Cat House as it was.
It's going to be rare to have a cat that just urinates everywhere. Most are box trained. Boxes stink, but it's infinitely better than free urination.
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Old 11-17-2018, 08:23 PM
 
Location: Planet Woof
3,139 posts, read 3,514,750 times
Reputation: 9889
Quote:
Originally Posted by oldtrader View Post
Most landlords will not allow cats, because a lot of them urinate all over the apartment/house and t stinks so bad no one wants to rent the unit any more.

I know of one apartment house of over 20 units in Florida, where so many cats had lived in it over the years, it smelt so bad that it was impossible to rent. It went for sale at an auction, and a Realtor from Florida I knew, bought it for about 20% of normal value. He was the only bidder, and his first bid was the only one.

He renamed it The Cat House, and only rented to little old ladies my own age now, and every one had to have at least one cat. He figured that cat owners do not smell the cat smell. He has a gold mine. It is almost impossible for those older ladies with cats to find anyone that will rent to them with their cats. Within 6 months he had a 2 year waiting list to even get into the apartments. They only call him if there is a major problem, which he immediately sends over his handy man to make repairs.

Results: He owns a cash cow as they say, bringing in a good solid steady income. The ladies take care of the units, as they don't want to lose their rentals. One dies or moves out to a nursing home, etc. one day, and by the next day the unit is cleaned up and ready for rent with a waiting list it takes about 1 or 2 calls to rent it back up, so very little lost rent. I have not seen him for 25 years and as he was 10 years older than I am, I have no idea if he is still alive, and do not know if there is a new owner they have kept The Cat House as it was.
I find this fascinating and funny as hell!
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Old 11-17-2018, 08:41 PM
 
Location: Planet Woof
3,139 posts, read 3,514,750 times
Reputation: 9889
Quote:
Originally Posted by Serious Conversation View Post
It's going to be rare to have a cat that just urinates everywhere. Most are box trained. Boxes stink, but it's infinitely better than free urination.
You'd be surprised. I used to do home visits for a living in health care and this is absolutely not the case. Litter boxes fill up fast and often don't get changed. Cats mark their territory sometimes. Sick or elderly or stressed cats become incontinent. Owners become unable physically to clean messes up.

Nothing except pole cat stinks like cat urine! I have done home visits where I had to look at my watch and hold my breath to check on a client like these and then drive home with all the windows down to try to blow off the stink. Not even a hot shower did it.
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Old 11-18-2018, 07:47 AM
 
4,135 posts, read 3,795,747 times
Reputation: 11361
In states where a LL can quickly evict a tenant for non-payment of rent, lease violations, criminal activity, or simply not leaving at the end of the lease if the LL doesn't want to renew, deposits are low. My son lives in a state where it is very easy for a LL to evict someone. His deposit on a $700/month apartment is $200. He needed only first month's rent and $200 to get in, and of course proof of income (3 paystubs) and a good rental record/credit check. I'm not even sure if they ran any credit or background. You see, the LL knows he can get him out really fast in that state if he's a problem.

In MA, law limits LL to first month, last month, and one month security. It is extraordinarily difficult to obtain an eviction - could take a year, especially if there is a person under 18 living in the unit, or someone who is disabled. And nowadays, alcoholism and drug addiction qualify as disability. So, I would rather have my unit sit empty for months, and wait for the perfectly qualified tenant, instead of taking anyone who is one drop less than perfect.

In CT, it always takes at least 2 months to evict someone, often longer. So, again, we insist on the maximum security deposit allowed by law, which is 2 months rent. So to get into a unit in either of these tenant friendly states, a tenant would have to have 3 months worth up front, and have a perfect rental and employment and credit record.

Laws that make it difficult for a LL to evict a problem tenant, and courts that think that they're helping poor unfortunate people by stringing out eviction proceedings, simply exacerbate the housing shortage, because LLs have learned the hard way that it's better to let the unit sit unoccupied than to take a risk on anyone who is less than perfectly qualified with a long track record of stable tenancy.
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Old 11-18-2018, 09:06 AM
 
245 posts, read 79,352 times
Reputation: 997
Quote:
Originally Posted by HappyDogToday View Post
I have done nothing but rent either a house or an apartment all my life. I am currently on my 7th lease where I am presently and really like where I am, but was curious about another complex for next year. I had always liked their setting and location so decided to stop by their office to learn more about price, etc.

What I learned was very different than what I expected. Maybe even subtle discrimination against retirees.

The rent for a one bedroom was the same as where I am but the deposits and application process were unreasonable, in my opinion.

They had a 2 pet limit (typical) and wanted $250 non-refundable deposit per pet, plus $30 per pet per month.

They wanted 3 times the monthly rent up front plus a $600 security deposit! They wanted a year's worth of pay stubs. They would not take a Social Security statement, bank statements, or tax returns as income proof. Plus credit checks, of course.

I am on SS plus self employed with a regular monthly income but their rules left me out in the cold plus the security and pet deposits being what they were.

It would cost almost $3800 in deposits just to get in a $750 a month apartment. That is insane plus the subtle implication the SS wasn't "real" income.

I am not unfamiliar with some of the stringent demands on renting now, but this was ridiculous. Thinkiing of moving? Get all your info first. It is not as easy as it was 10 years ago.

Guess I will stay where I am at for a very long time.
Find a different apartment complex. Not all of them are like that.
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Old 11-18-2018, 10:32 AM
 
4,490 posts, read 4,752,310 times
Reputation: 9972
Quote:
Originally Posted by HappyDogToday View Post
You'd be surprised. I used to do home visits for a living in health care and this is absolutely not the case. Litter boxes fill up fast and often don't get changed. Cats mark their territory sometimes. Sick or elderly or stressed cats become incontinent. Owners become unable physically to clean messes up.

Nothing except pole cat stinks like cat urine! I have done home visits where I had to look at my watch and hold my breath to check on a client like these and then drive home with all the windows down to try to blow off the stink. Not even a hot shower did it.


Whether dogs or cats... it is the pet owner that is the problem, not the pet. If someone is going to have a pet it takes time and energy to take proper care of them, train them etc., I grew up in NYC with my parents renting with pets, have been renting all mt adult life, have had pets while renting and never had a problem with urinating, dogs eating apt. bits... it's the pet owner, not the pet. Train your pets!!!
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Old 11-18-2018, 11:00 AM
 
Location: NYC
2,919 posts, read 1,595,504 times
Reputation: 7964
Our cat, once it got older, just started randomly urinating anywhere in the house after a lifetime of being good. It was sick & probably confused & feverish... it was a difficult time for a few years.
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