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Old 11-22-2018, 08:06 AM
 
Location: Upstate, NY
607 posts, read 260,726 times
Reputation: 753

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Congratulations on your retirement! Every so often I think of an occupation, activity, hobby, or goal I’d like to take part in or achieve and realize there is no way I can do it- until retirement. My life is hectic and filled with obligations, deadlines, and responsibilities, as most folks’ lives are. I sometimes think I may find my “niche” once I retire. At the least, I will find my own pace of life, and hope to have more time with family and friends, and focus upon making memories rather than accumulating things. You have that opportunity now. Enjoy!
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Old 11-22-2018, 08:09 AM
 
6,241 posts, read 4,725,740 times
Reputation: 12780
Quote:
Originally Posted by gentlearts View Post
You misunderstood me. I couldnít agree more that we can have plenty of great possibilities after retirement. But, you cannot deny that retiring from a job you spent 40 years going to every day is one of lifeís endings.
If I misunderstood I think it had something to do with the way you expressed yourself: "Itís an adjustment to realize that we have less ahead of us than behind us." I think retirement is a beginning where we can have way more ahead of us than behind us.
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Old 11-22-2018, 09:16 AM
 
Location: Chicago area
14,374 posts, read 7,918,717 times
Reputation: 53477
I retired at 58 after being a workaholic and working insane hours. I would work a double shift from 3pm until 6am, go home, take a nap, and be back at work at 3pm until 11pm. It was killing me. A new manager came in and told me that I had to pick a permanent 12 hour shift either on days or nights. I said nope. I had other jobs lined up but decided to take a month off first. Well I started a project at home and one month turned into nearly 3 years of retirement.
I got used to doing whatever I wanted, whenever I wanted and I had planned for early retirement. I've always been the kind of person that believed in back up money for the backup money.

You will find that work isn't life. Once you discover that there is a whole big other existence out there to explore, that old mentality will die. You actually have time to devote 100% of your attention to anything that amuses you at the time. Be it a beautiful hummingbird moth in the garden or scuba diving on a beautiful reef. Your perspective changes.

I think once you get used to the idea that you don't have to abide by some else's demand on you time you will find the freedom intoxicating JC. It took me a few months for that workaholic spring to unwind but it was replaced by utter contentment. I've learned how to just be.
We're in the process of selling my childhood home and it will finally be out of my life on November 30th. It was not a happy place for me but it was a really great rental and helped me retire early. That being said I will still be happy to never see it again. It's nice that you had a great childhood JC. I'd rather forget mine.

Last edited by animalcrazy; 11-22-2018 at 09:35 AM..
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Old 11-22-2018, 11:28 AM
Status: "Loving life, wife and job!" (set 7 days ago)
 
Location: USA
996 posts, read 384,185 times
Reputation: 2669
Is there an upside to your story? Financially stable? Good health? Happy in your marriage?

Or are you gonna be like my last boss? He was the most selfish SOB who ever lived. Has a nice home in the desert, worth over a $1M bucks. Built another home in the upper northeast where he grew up. Family is healthy, lots of grandkids. But no, he’s got to battled with a neighbor and had a restraining order issued.

You’d think he’d have every reason to relax and enjoy retirement but having said that, the fact that he isn’t may be just payback for when he was my long term boss.

Come on man.
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Old 11-22-2018, 12:34 PM
 
8,191 posts, read 11,908,623 times
Reputation: 17964
Quote:
Originally Posted by k7baixo View Post
Is there an upside to your story? Financially stable? Good health? Happy in your marriage?
The OP won't be able to answer any of your questions.

Although he's retired now, he is no longer a member of City-Data.
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Old 11-22-2018, 12:43 PM
 
1,075 posts, read 1,117,614 times
Reputation: 1416
He just posted this today, why is not no longer a member?
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Old 11-22-2018, 01:33 PM
 
2,575 posts, read 4,689,485 times
Reputation: 6378
With retirement, we often find all the extra free time lends itself to too much ruminating on the past. I should have done this. Why did I do that? Did I do the best I could have raising my child? Should I have worked more, less? Did I accomplish enough? What am I leaving behind that has value for others? Having the time to ponder my early life has been painful at times, and joyous at others.

It can be hard to keep from looking back and wondering how your life might have been different. But, ultimately, it's a waste of emotional energy. It's hard to focus ahead, but I keep reminding myself to do so. And with my volunteer work and old and new hobbies, I try to keep busy so that I'm living more in the present and less in the past, just as I did when I was a working mother and didn't have the luxury of worrying about anything but tomorrow's day at work and getting my son to his next extracurricular activity.

Retirement is a huge change in one's life - probably on a par with having children or changing one's marital status. Like those events, it takes time to adjust to. You will make it, but it might take a while and it might be rocky at first, given the circumstances you describe.
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Old 11-22-2018, 03:25 PM
 
2,677 posts, read 1,070,961 times
Reputation: 5168
Quote:
Originally Posted by Just Crazy View Post
I retired at age 62 after working non stop fighting the corporate rat race and trying to be successful at work.

While I was working full time, I did not have time for anything. I worked 60-70-80 hours a week. I had little time for family or friends. The only thing that was important to me was my work and moving forward through the organizational chart.

At age 62 I was laid off and decided that was enough. I was bitter and angry. All that effort for my company and they lay me off and escort me out with a security guard.

The first few weeks of my retirement I was extremely restless. I did not know what to do. In frustration, I went through the basement and found all kinds of picture books. Hundreds of photos of me and my family when I was young. Grandparents, Aunts, Uncles, friends, and neighbors. Everyone seemed so happy.

I started getting obsessive about my youth. I decided that for the first time in thirty years I would travel to North Dakota and visit the places of my youth. The trip was emotional and brought back so many memories. The people in the town I grew up in seemed more pleasant than the big city. Maybe they had it right, family, friends, and neighbors were more important than the job and moving up in corporate America.

I determined that 40 years in corporate America had destroyed me and I needed to slow down and enjoy retirement. But after being on a bucking bronco for 40 years how can I relax and enjoy retirement?
I think a project with your family tree would be ideal for you. It will take up a lot time which you have plenty of and you learn so much about your people and where they came from and what they did. You learn tons of world history at the same time. It will be extremely intricate at times as you gather citations to prove your tree. It's like panning for gold. It is very satisfying knowing you are making a generous gift for your entire family.
Feel free to PM me for guidance on how and where to start.
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Old 11-22-2018, 09:17 PM
 
3,801 posts, read 2,014,813 times
Reputation: 3260
Quote:
Originally Posted by Just Crazy View Post
I retired at age 62 after working non stop fighting the corporate rat race and trying to be successful at work.

While I was working full time, I did not have time for anything. I worked 60-70-80 hours a week. I had little time for family or friends. The only thing that was important to me was my work and moving forward through the organizational chart.

At age 62 I was laid off and decided that was enough. I was bitter and angry. All that effort for my company and they lay me off and escort me out with a security guard.

The first few weeks of my retirement I was extremely restless. I did not know what to do. In frustration, I went through the basement and found all kinds of picture books. Hundreds of photos of me and my family when I was young. Grandparents, Aunts, Uncles, friends, and neighbors. Everyone seemed so happy.

I started getting obsessive about my youth. I decided that for the first time in thirty years I would travel to North Dakota and visit the places of my youth. The trip was emotional and brought back so many memories. The people in the town I grew up in seemed more pleasant than the big city. Maybe they had it right, family, friends, and neighbors were more important than the job and moving up in corporate America.

I determined that 40 years in corporate America had destroyed me and I needed to slow down and enjoy retirement. But after being on a bucking bronco for 40 years how can I relax and enjoy retirement?
You know there's a reason for the rat race right? 401K. ") I'm sure while corporate America has "destroyed" you, that you enjoy spending corporate America's 401K to pay for your expenses this period of retirement.

Corporate America is a means to an end. Except for those freakish athletes who only need to tolerate it for 10 to 15 years. LOL.
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Old 11-23-2018, 07:42 AM
 
39,227 posts, read 20,350,186 times
Reputation: 12743
Quote:
Originally Posted by Just Crazy View Post
I retired at age 62 after working non stop fighting the corporate rat race and trying to be successful at work.

While I was working full time, I did not have time for anything. I worked 60-70-80 hours a week. I had little time for family or friends. The only thing that was important to me was my work and moving forward through the organizational chart.

At age 62 I was laid off and decided that was enough. I was bitter and angry. All that effort for my company and they lay me off and escort me out with a security guard.

The first few weeks of my retirement I was extremely restless. I did not know what to do. In frustration, I went through the basement and found all kinds of picture books. Hundreds of photos of me and my family when I was young. Grandparents, Aunts, Uncles, friends, and neighbors. Everyone seemed so happy.

I started getting obsessive about my youth. I decided that for the first time in thirty years I would travel to North Dakota and visit the places of my youth. The trip was emotional and brought back so many memories. The people in the town I grew up in seemed more pleasant than the big city. Maybe they had it right, family, friends, and neighbors were more important than the job and moving up in corporate America.

I determined that 40 years in corporate America had destroyed me and I needed to slow down and enjoy retirement. But after being on a bucking bronco for 40 years how can I relax and enjoy retirement?
It's a mindset.. That energy that you once poured into work, now pour it into enjoying your own company and enjoying time with your family.
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