U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Retirement
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
 
Old 11-23-2018, 08:19 AM
 
6,839 posts, read 3,713,227 times
Reputation: 18078

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by MadManofBethesda View Post
The OP won't be able to answer any of your questions.

Although he's retired now, he is no longer a member of City-Data.
So true, yet being Retired Now, I'm sure he will be back in a few days.

Quote:
Originally Posted by organic_donna View Post
He just posted this today, why is not no longer a member?
"Retired Now" was one of the early screen names of an individual who drops into CD every couple weeks or so, under a different name each time, posts several questions in almost the same format as the OP here, then drops off CD the same or next day. See him a lot down in the Work forum.
Quick reply to this message

 
Old 11-23-2018, 03:52 PM
 
1,813 posts, read 1,137,172 times
Reputation: 2412
This is just "nuts"
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-25-2018, 02:34 PM
 
12,686 posts, read 14,068,003 times
Reputation: 34772
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dustyroad70 View Post
This is just "nuts"

See what retirement can do to you
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-25-2018, 03:08 PM
 
7,899 posts, read 5,031,079 times
Reputation: 13549
Quote:
Originally Posted by Just Crazy View Post
At age 62 I was laid off and decided that was enough. I was bitter and angry. All that effort for my company and they lay me off and escort me out with a security guard...
Quote:
Originally Posted by organic_donna View Post
... They took my badge, my manual, and I lost my security privileges. ...
Quote:
Originally Posted by jmp61616 View Post
.... In the end, it is all BS anyway. How many jobs really make a difference? ...
Quote:
Originally Posted by gentlearts View Post
... I think the abrupt ending of your job, before you were ready, was a slap in the face. ...
Some people derive (or derived?) considerable personal satisfaction from being an “insider”, from being the person who remains in the room after most others are politely asked to leave… to be sitting at the table’s head, to have a pleasant young-person discretely bring over a folder of information that can only be read in the subject room. Others need to wait in line, to explain themselves, to seek permission… but the insiders merely flash a badge (or several), and are waved through, sometimes with a smart salute. This is a pleasure orthogonal to climbing the institutional ladder. The insiders decide who gets scholarships, who wins the contract, which topics get promulgated for request-for-proposal, which agreements get signed and which get rebuffed. It just feels good to be within the inner circle, regardless of how we feel about the institutional politics.

Then, one day, and sometimes in precipitous and shocking circumstances, this access is withdrawn. The persons who used to salute one, coldly and “professionally” escort one out. The door – figurative and literal – slams behind one. Even with a “golden parachute”, even after decades of fine and commendable service, it’s a sickening feeling to surrender the credentials, the badge, the keys, the computers, the access. There’s really no recovering from that – even if the money-situation is great, one’s health is good, and one remains justifiably proud of vigorous and thriving career… a former career.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-25-2018, 03:20 PM
 
1,075 posts, read 1,117,388 times
Reputation: 1416
Quote:
Originally Posted by ohio_peasant View Post
Some people derive (or derived?) considerable personal satisfaction from being an “insider”, from being the person who remains in the room after most others are politely asked to leave… to be sitting at the table’s head, to have a pleasant young-person discretely bring over a folder of information that can only be read in the subject room. Others need to wait in line, to explain themselves, to seek permission… but the insiders merely flash a badge (or several), and are waved through, sometimes with a smart salute. This is a pleasure orthogonal to climbing the institutional ladder. The insiders decide who gets scholarships, who wins the contract, which topics get promulgated for request-for-proposal, which agreements get signed and which get rebuffed. It just feels good to be within the inner circle, regardless of how we feel about the institutional politics.

Then, one day, and sometimes in precipitous and shocking circumstances, this access is withdrawn. The persons who used to salute one, coldly and “professionally” escort one out. The door – figurative and literal – slams behind one. Even with a “golden parachute”, even after decades of fine and commendable service, it’s a sickening feeling to surrender the credentials, the badge, the keys, the computers, the access. There’s really no recovering from that – even if the money-situation is great, one’s health is good, and one remains justifiably proud of vigorous and thriving career… a former career.
You quoted me in your post, but what you just described were not my circumstances at all. I was all too happy to give up my manual, badge and ramp access. I walked out of the airport one last time and left that life behind. I felt like a snake shedding its skin. I never looked back.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-25-2018, 03:43 PM
 
510 posts, read 303,791 times
Reputation: 2502
Quote:
Originally Posted by organic_donna View Post
You quoted me in your post, but what you just described were not my circumstances at all. I was all too happy to give up my manual, badge and ramp access. I walked out of the airport one last time and left that life behind. I felt like a snake shedding its skin. I never looked back.
Hear! Hear! I felt the same way. Almost as if the years in between starting and ending had never happened.

Just "a thing" I had done when I was young, like anything else.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-25-2018, 04:05 PM
 
7,899 posts, read 5,031,079 times
Reputation: 13549
Quote:
Originally Posted by organic_donna View Post
You quoted me in your post, but what you just described were not my circumstances at all. I was all too happy to give up my manual, badge and ramp access. I walked out of the airport one last time and left that life behind. I felt like a snake shedding its skin. I never looked back.
Quote:
Originally Posted by fallstaff View Post
Hear! Hear! I felt the same way. Almost as if the years in between starting and ending had never happened.

Just "a thing" I had done when I was young, like anything else.
My apologies. I wanted to be brief but broad in quoting.

Some people regard their badge is just an encumbrance of daily logistics, and the job itself as mere route to a paycheck. These perhaps have the least regret upon entering retirement. Others are entirely the opposite. The badge is a comfort, a totem, a source of identity. The badge is gingerly placed atop of the dresser when going to bed. The badge is flashed anywhere and everywhere... to hanker for a discount at the home improvement store, to get a free upgrade when renting a car, to impress the TSA, to swell one's chest in importance if say pulled over for speeding on the highway. Lose the badge, and lose one's special-ness, one's distinction. Badge-less, we're humdrum and mundane, an anonymous Everyman, standing in an anonymous line, hollow.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-25-2018, 04:34 PM
 
2,289 posts, read 1,294,870 times
Reputation: 1520
Quote:
Originally Posted by organic_donna View Post
Just. Crazy,
The most important thing is don’t be bitter and angry about your employer turning on you. I worked for a major airline, and learned early on not to have any connection to my employer. I worked hard, but for my own gain, not to get accolades. Unless you work at a small family run business, employers don’t have any loyalty to you. It’s a hard pill to swallow for some people.

Donna
I'm not retired yet, but I got burned by an employer some years ago. Having learned through experience that corporate America has no loyalty to its employees, I have since cultivated emotional detachment from the job and employer. I do not regard work as part of my identity, its just something I do to pay the bills.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-26-2018, 05:12 AM
 
1,075 posts, read 1,117,388 times
Reputation: 1416
Quote:
Originally Posted by ohio_peasant View Post
My apologies. I wanted to be brief but broad in quoting.

Some people regard their badge is just an encumbrance of daily logistics, and the job itself as mere route to a paycheck. These perhaps have the least regret upon entering retirement. Others are entirely the opposite. The badge is a comfort, a totem, a source of identity. The badge is gingerly placed atop of the dresser when going to bed. The badge is flashed anywhere and everywhere... to hanker for a discount at the home improvement store, to get a free upgrade when renting a car, to impress the TSA, to swell one's chest in importance if say pulled over for speeding on the highway. Lose the badge, and lose one's special-ness, one's distinction. Badge-less, we're humdrum and mundane, an anonymous Everyman, standing in an anonymous line, hollow.

My badge was a collar, that kept me tethered, once that came off, I was free.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-26-2018, 05:19 AM
 
1,075 posts, read 1,117,388 times
Reputation: 1416
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tim Randal Walker View Post
I'm not retired yet, but I got burned by an employer some years ago. Having learned through experience that corporate America has no loyalty to its employees, I have since cultivated emotional detachment from the job and employer. I do not regard work as part of my identity, its just something I do to pay the bills.
The way I justified my dissatisfaction with the job, was to save as much money as I could, because I knew that was my ticket out. I had paid off my mortgage early, and that allowed me to put 50% of my pay in the Roth 401K. In 2009 the market started to rebound, and I watched my investments grow and grow. In 2012, my employer filed bankruptcy and in 2014 they offered a small buyout. I had saved enough money to last the rest of my life. What a great feeling that was to be able to retire at 59.

Last edited by organic_donna; 11-26-2018 at 05:28 AM..
Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


 
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:
Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Retirement
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top