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Old 11-28-2018, 10:39 AM
 
6,306 posts, read 5,042,575 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GotHereQuickAsICould View Post
The number of young people who aren't interested in learning to drive or owning a car is surprising to me.
That is surprising to me also. We were all out there ready to go at 15 or 16.
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Old 11-28-2018, 11:29 AM
 
Location: Tennessee
23,541 posts, read 17,525,434 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by The_Resourcer View Post
Gen Z kids not being taught cursive handwriting (though I read Delaware is bringing it back to some of their schools).
I have a Gen Z cousin who cannot tell time on a traditional, analog clock. I'm serious. She has to have a digital clock.
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Old 11-28-2018, 11:34 AM
 
6,306 posts, read 5,042,575 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Serious Conversation View Post
I have a Gen Z cousin who cannot tell time on a traditional, analog clock. I'm serious. She has to have a digital clock.
But could we use a sundial or an abacus - time marches forward.
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Old 11-28-2018, 11:36 AM
 
Location: Tennessee
23,541 posts, read 17,525,434 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Clemencia53 View Post
But could we use a sundial or an abacus - time marches forward.
Those are far, far more antiquated than an analog clock
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Old 11-28-2018, 12:24 PM
 
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Reading a sundial is just a matter of observing light and shadows (building one is another matter entirely). An abacus, for addition and subtraction, is just a matter of counting in base-10, moving beads around. Multiplication or division are admittedly harder.

But using a slide-rule... that's much harder. It's a skill that my parents had, which I never acquired... though I inherited a pile (literally) of slide-rules. I went through engineering-school not long after slide-rules disappeared. Older colleagues at my first workplace still had them (the last of the WW2 generation were retiring), but no longer used them.

I did get to use a planimeter, though. Anyone remember those?
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Old 11-28-2018, 12:25 PM
 
Location: Raleigh
8,295 posts, read 6,147,869 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Serious Conversation View Post
I have a Gen Z cousin who cannot tell time on a traditional, analog clock. I'm serious. She has to have a digital clock.
Its like tying your shoe. Its not concerning because its not hard. Even an illiterate can look at an analog clock and read it.
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Old 11-28-2018, 01:44 PM
 
1,912 posts, read 2,958,980 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by katharsis View Post
While reading about the latest environmental warning that says that humanity either might be or probably will be basically doomed due to climate change in about 60 years or so, I was thinking how much has happened in the past 50 years that I either did not foresee or did not think would happen so soon.

What can you add to the following list that YOU did not foresee?

- Smartphones
- Personal computers
- The rise of Neo Nazi groups
- Legal same-sex marriages
- Kindles and other electronic books
- The International Space Station
- The Internet and social media (i.e., Facebook)
- The end of so many daily newspapers and the "dumbing down" of most nightly newscasts
- Many more highly over-protective parents


P.S. This thread is NOT meant to start a discussion about whether global warming is real or not, or to start a debate about the pros or cons of any issue or invention. There is already a thread on this in the P&OC forum about the global warming issue -- Trump Administrationís Strategy on Climate: Try to Bury Its Own Scientific Report -- and I would guess for any other issue that might come up, also!


Guitars that tune themselves. That is just laziness!


SS
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Old 11-28-2018, 01:45 PM
 
Location: Kirkland, WA (Metro Seattle)
3,982 posts, read 3,250,733 times
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I was born in 1967. Highlights and low lights that year, socially, for sure! Not going to go into that now, but was a more-tumultuous time than now for sure.

The '67 Shelby 500 was a heckuva car, the updated so-called "Eleanor" being a gorgeous and iconic vision of the era. I may or (more likely) will not ever own one, but this is undecided. My point, then to now: functionality is a shadow of my 2015 Porsche GTS C4, at about the same price in modern dollars. Entirely predictable, though.

Examples of (other) advancements that were entirely predictable, 1967 - today:
  • Self-inflicted environmental degradation leading to desertification and suffering. Too damn bad: stop breeding like rats?
  • Near-extinction of major/large wild mammal species. They're doomed, period. Stock up the DNA bank for the future; their future is the zoo only.
  • Technology advances are hard to predict. None surprise me per se.

Unpredictable:

When the swarms of 'refugees' from climate and other catastrophes would start invading the West due to overpopulation, war, etc. Already occurring in Europe, and it's been going on here awhile too and come to a head recently: thank God we have a Executive Branch to demand 'NO' to alien hordes. We don't need economic migrants who refuse to integrate, thanks: apply that resourcefulness to your own country.

How long it will take Western society to stop, and reverse, the above butt-cold using whatever means necessary. That will take a massive groundswell from within the U.S., and European states, populations. The day will come when 'the People' say, "enough!"

Fortunately, there have been major agricultural advances, too, to by-and-large keep us all fed. There is little starvation in the world today, which should make anyone glad.

Complete wildcard:

American social bifurcation, the traditionalists vs. Socialists and other wreckers. No idea exactly how that will solve itself, either through force of arms, dialog, or other benign re-integration. I hope for the former, but if the latter the freaks will lose. Pyrrhic victory for the nation, though and we'd become another rump Roman Empire.

Space? We're finding it's too expensive to move men into space. I personally believe this will be the realm of robots, including Bracewell and von Neuman probes. Too, that we will become 'Belters and mine asteroids for the humongous resources. Beyond that, and the orbit of Mars, I am skeptical. Point being it may take unknown advances in physics to move us elsewhere: folding space, wormholes, other mathematical abstractions I can't predict nor can anyone else. Man cannot move at sublight pace, unless fusion ramships are possible or other sublight tech to move us to near lightspeed.

Disasters are wild cards. If there is major climate change, it might wipe away a sizable fraction of humanity. Tough luck. A supervolcano event could be extinction-level, or see "wipe out significant..."

Nuclear or biological weapons, not sure which is worse. Nukes are blunt instruments the likes of which we cannot imagine. I suspect a city or other target will go up in a mushroom cloud by terrorists vs. state actors first (or next, rather).

Rise of an AI: God knows what that will be like, which may sweep aside this entire list based on coldly rational calculations made in microseconds.
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Old 11-28-2018, 03:12 PM
 
Location: Washington State
18,445 posts, read 9,548,793 times
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- internet
- smartphones
- end of the iron curtain (Soviet Union)
- Facebook
- personal computers
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Old 11-28-2018, 03:28 PM
 
Location: NE Mississippi
13,636 posts, read 8,559,902 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Clemencia53 View Post
But could we use a sundial or an abacus - time marches forward.
Can we have a link?
I will confess to not being able to tell time with an abacus.
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