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Old 11-30-2018, 08:58 PM
 
3,536 posts, read 1,350,218 times
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"Lots of people I talk to can't wait until they can retire and move to a nice town where people are nice, friendly and relaxed."

we have LOTS of those where we live.
the newly retired expect everyone else,
Except Them, to be "nice, friendly and relaxed".
and those who "bring the bad" with them are the ones
who want to change what brought them here.
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Old 11-30-2018, 09:50 PM
 
Location: Silicon Valley
18,081 posts, read 22,924,480 times
Reputation: 35201
Quote:
Originally Posted by Specific Point View Post
City-Data, and other message boards, are full of posts from people who are looking for Mayberry (From the Old Andy Griffith TV Show) If not a small town like Mayberry maybe a mid-sized place where live if less stressful than the big cities that have the best job market.

I am currently living and working full time in the Washington DC area. I run into so many people here in their 50s who are counting down the days before they can retire and move out of his soul-sucking rat race city. They tell me they are sticking around DC until they are eligible for their pension, Social Security or target number in their 401k. Then they will leave this terrible place and never look back.

Lots of people I talk to can't wait until they can retire and move to a nice town where people are nice, friendly and relaxed.

So here is my question to people who are retired and moved to a new town/state. Are the people in your new retirement community nicer, friendlier and more relaxed than the people in the city you lived in while working full time? (IN GENERAL)
The answer is NO! All they normally talk about is their health problems, criticisms, things they are unhappy about.

This is why I volunteer with younger people who still have their futures ahead of them. They make me feel younger. I'm not ready to hang out with people who are just waiting to die.

That said, I still prefer living in independent senior housing, because it's quieter. I'll occasionally hear screaming grandkids running up and down the hall, who are visiting a tenant, but it's not every day.

Really, the worst noise situation that could happen in my building is someone who blasts their TV all night. Fortunately, I don't have a problem with this with my neighbors.
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Old 12-01-2018, 06:10 AM
 
127 posts, read 43,632 times
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We retired in Colorado Springs. Folks here are a heck of a lot nicer than they were in Sacramento, CA or Seattle, WA. But I thought folks were nicer still in Dayton, OH and Hunstville, AL where I spent a lot of time.
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Old 12-01-2018, 06:41 AM
 
Location: Loudon, TN
5,767 posts, read 4,825,615 times
Reputation: 19390
Quote:
Originally Posted by Specific Point View Post
No, the new town does not have to be small. Many larger cities may be nice and friendly but I suspect they are not the boom cities popular with younger people.

I think the economy for white-collar professionals has changed in the last 10 years where the good jobs are moving to the larger metro areas. That is stress filled, expensive and crowded. Washington DC for example. Nearly everyone I talk to here about living in the DC area says it is a great place to visit but no longer a great place to live. I ask them why they moved here and most of the immigrants say because there are people like me here. Most of the other people say they live in the DC area because there are lots of interesting and well-paid jobs. (Only a few like the rat race culture.)

Many of the people hate it but stick around because they can do their career here and job opportunities for Ph.D. Scientists are not so great in Knoxville TN, a great friendly mid-sized town 450 miles away.
I guess you've never heard of Oak Ridge National Laboratory. You can hardly swing a cat there without hitting a "Ph.D. Scientist".


Yes. Moved from NorCal to east TN 5 years ago. People in the area in general are much nicer here in the Knoxville area than in Sacramento. People in my specific neighborhood and the nearby small towns are incredibly friendly, generous, and welcoming.
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Old 12-01-2018, 07:56 AM
 
Location: equator
3,425 posts, read 1,524,633 times
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Our friends cashed out of Dupont Circle, DC to move to Moab, UT as they are avid outdoorists. But they return to DC for cultural events. They love Moab, which is largely a tourist town.

We left Moab for Ecuador but that was to stretch our retirement dollars. We love the laid-back beach living and expats are a unique bunch with interesting life stories to tell. We all pull together if someone is in need. The locals are friendly too. We are happy with our choice. It's more small-town than most are used to.
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Old 12-01-2018, 08:09 AM
 
Location: Mid-Atlantic east coast
5,371 posts, read 9,857,680 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Specific Point View Post
City-Data, and other message boards, are full of posts from people who are looking for Mayberry (From the Old Andy Griffith TV Show) If not a small town like Mayberry maybe a mid-sized place where live if less stressful than the big cities that have the best job market.

I am currently living and working full time in the Washington DC area. I run into so many people here in their 50s who are counting down the days before they can retire and move out of his soul-sucking rat race city. They tell me they are sticking around DC until they are eligible for their pension, Social Security or target number in their 401k. Then they will leave this terrible place and never look back.

Lots of people I talk to can't wait until they can retire and move to a nice town where people are nice, friendly and relaxed.

So here is my question to people who are retired and moved to a new town/state. Are the people in your new retirement community nicer, friendlier and more relaxed than the people in the city you lived in while working full time? (IN GENERAL)
Yes! Most definitely. Away from the large metro ares, people are less stressed, kinder and friendlier. It's much less dog-eat-dog. And people look out for one another more.

(we moved from a large metro area to a community of 6,000 people. It's kinder more gentle here).
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Old 12-01-2018, 11:46 AM
 
Location: Ft. Myers
17,628 posts, read 11,162,634 times
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I've been retired here twice, but now work 40 per, and have lived in a lot of places in this country, so I have some insight into the way people are in various cities and States.

I think the people here in the Ft Myers area are among the friendliest anywhere. Maybe it is because a lot of them are on vacation, or because they come from other places, but I rarely find someone who is hard to get along with. Even friendlier is the Cape Coral area, it is sort of a big, small town, if you understand what I am saying. It is large, but the people here are very much like those living in smaller towns across the country.
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Old 12-01-2018, 12:23 PM
 
10,606 posts, read 12,130,459 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DaveinMtAiry View Post
Yeah I have the same thoughts. I don't mean to sound defensive because the DC burbs is where I spent the majority of my life but DC is an amazing place. Now if the OP and his workers are stuck in Northern VA traffic on their way to work every day I can see the need to get out of that. But it does not mean the area is terrible, in fact it's actually pretty great for a lot of different reasons.



But again I'm talking about the MD burbs. I agree people in DC and No Va are not super friendly but that's just big city life and no different than Boston or any other big city.
I am one of those rare Washington DC natives. Born in DC, moved to Maryland suburbs, then moved to NoVA suburbs. Due to a short stint as a military spouse, lived in Maine and Japan for several years.

I agree this is a great area. Working and traffic make you tired. But I get enough friendly socialization at work (I know that sounds sad!!). It's enough for me. I can tell you, though, it will not be enough for me when I retire. This entire area is about working and jobs and spending. For a retired person, that all changes. You don't necessarily want to be living in a neighborhood where everyone leaves all day to commute and work and then come home exhausted. People are too busy to be friendly really. Not that they are unfriendly. Just be with work and/or work/kids.

I posted on this forum before about my parents. They've just moved from NoVA to The Villages in Florida and they would say HECK YEAH it's a lot friendlier there.
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Old 12-01-2018, 02:47 PM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
30,675 posts, read 49,423,020 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Specific Point View Post
... Are the people in your new retirement community nicer, friendlier and more relaxed than the people in the city you lived in while working full time? (IN GENERAL)
Yes.

After I retired, we moved to Eastern Connecticut where we already owned a home. We lived there for 5 years, and then we moved to rural Maine.

Our home in Maine is in a town of 235 people. Homes are commonly space a mile apart [though a few homes are packed in tight, 20 yards from one another].

There are a few residents who are loners and just want to be left alone. But even those loners are helpful when you need help.

A person could move here, stay on your own farm, and you would be left alone for many years.

But you can also go out and socialize. It is all left to your own desires.

When I moved here, I got active right away with the American Legion, the VFW, and the Masonic Lodge. That allowed me to meet people and it helped me to learn where the local things were. I put a little effort into getting to know people, and we were accepted into the community with no problems.
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Old 12-01-2018, 03:14 PM
 
1,812 posts, read 1,136,829 times
Reputation: 2412
Quote:
Originally Posted by Specific Point View Post
City-Data, and other message boards, are full of posts from people who are looking for Mayberry (From the Old Andy Griffith TV Show) If not a small town like Mayberry maybe a mid-sized place where live if less stressful than the big cities that have the best job market.

I am currently living and working full time in the Washington DC area. I run into so many people here in their 50s who are counting down the days before they can retire and move out of his soul-sucking rat race city. They tell me they are sticking around DC until they are eligible for their pension, Social Security or target number in their 401k. Then they will leave this terrible place and never look back.

Lots of people I talk to can't wait until they can retire and move to a nice town where people are nice, friendly and relaxed.

So here is my question to people who are retired and moved to a new town/state. Are the people in your new retirement community nicer, friendlier and more relaxed than the people in the city you lived in while working full time? (IN GENERAL)
Everywhere I go I find the same bad guy. It is me!
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