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Old 12-03-2018, 10:51 AM
 
Location: SoCal
13,216 posts, read 6,313,926 times
Reputation: 9827

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Quote:
Originally Posted by UsAll View Post
From my understanding (unless my understanding is mistaken), all Uber and Lyft drivers have to own their own vehicle (a vehicle is not provided to you by Uber or Lyft), whereas taxi drivers drive taxis which are owned by the taxi companies and most (if not all?) of those taxis have sealed fortifications/barriers (usually bulletproof) separating the backseat passengers from the front-seat driver. What person who owns their own vehcile is going to have the same type of sealed and bulletgproof fortifications/barriers installed between the front and back seats in his or her own owned vehicle (and all at his or her own expense)?

Although someone with a gun could just as well shoot at the driver from outside the vehicle into the side glass or the windshield (unless those are also designed to be bulletproof . . . which I don't know about one way or the other).


P.S.-- Or perhaps the poster that you were responding to is thinking of the safety risks of BOTH being an Uber or Lyft driver AND of being a taxi driver as well. Maybe he or she doesn't want to work in ANY capacity for anyone whereby they have to give rides to perfect strangers.
Plus for Uber driver, I only used Uber so far, the driver gets to decide to accept someone or not. Thatís what the Uber driver told us.
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Old 12-03-2018, 10:53 AM
 
Location: SoCal
13,216 posts, read 6,313,926 times
Reputation: 9827
Quote:
Originally Posted by eliza61nyc View Post
I think "bragging" also is a matter of perception also.

if someone ask a question about retiring early and post that they have a 2 mil portfolio. I want to know what they spend their money on. so if they say they spend ~9-10K a month, they are not bragging.

Why shouldn't some one say they are doing well? this is what I don't get. it's weird that a person can say how broke down they are and how they are living off of ss only but heaven forbid a person say they're budget is 9K a month.

anyhoo,
I guess my original point was that this fear of talking about one's finances as if it's some state secret is just interesting.

At this stage of my life, I need good, reliable information on having a great retirement and the best IMO to get that is to talk about money.
Not this forum, other forums they do discuss finance openly. This forum discusses other problem openly, like problem with their spouse. I cringe at both honestly. And I’m a very open person.
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Old 12-03-2018, 10:55 AM
 
Location: Around the UK!
156 posts, read 110,419 times
Reputation: 410
There are many reasons why people want to continue working in their 70's. What else meaningful can you do? In addition there are many people who want to make sure that they will never be dependent on their children as some of our parents were on us! There are also people from many countries who do not have SS or similar support schemes (Sidebar: looking at the state of this fund in the US I wouldn't be relying on it being a significant part of my long term retirement plan).

Also it seems weird to me that people like Warren Buffet and Charlie Munger and their ilk still go to work, even with their 11 figure wealth and someone who has existed in some corporate or government job believes that at that some arbitrary age they deserve to do nothing else until they die?

Having no money is one issue ... having no purpose is another thing.
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Old 12-03-2018, 11:21 AM
 
1,137 posts, read 569,507 times
Reputation: 4370
Quote:
Originally Posted by PatMil View Post
There are many reasons why people want to continue working in their 70's. What else meaningful can you do? In addition there are many people who want to make sure that they will never be dependent on their children as some of our parents were on us! There are also people from many countries who do not have SS or similar support schemes (Sidebar: looking at the state of this fund in the US I wouldn't be relying on it being a significant part of my long term retirement plan).

Also it seems weird to me that people like Warren Buffet and Charlie Munger and their ilk still go to work, even with their 11 figure wealth and someone who has existed in some corporate or government job believes that at that some arbitrary age they deserve to do nothing else until they die?

Having no money is one issue ... having no purpose is another thing
.
Wow.

I have no words to describe a thoughtful response for that post.
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Old 12-03-2018, 11:24 AM
 
2,414 posts, read 2,423,344 times
Reputation: 2850
Quote:
Originally Posted by mathjak107 View Post
my wife actually pushed me back in to it . she did not realize it was like giving a recovering druggie drugs . i became obsessed with it .



Well, buddy, I hope you get rich doing it! <----------- GET IT? BUDDY RICH? (followed by a rimshot sound for my lame pun)



P.S.-- For those who do not know, Buddy Rich was one of the greatest, most-famous, and most technically-proficient drummers who ever lived (to-date). He died in 1987 at age 69.

Last edited by UsAll; 12-03-2018 at 11:45 AM..
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Old 12-03-2018, 11:35 AM
Status: "Be yourself. What's the alternative?" (set 17 days ago)
 
8,681 posts, read 10,833,943 times
Reputation: 12728
I work w/ a few nurses, one who is 69 and the other who is 71. Both work Per Diem. Another is younger at around 64. Full time nursing after 60, well, I can't imagine that one!

The recession of 08 and beyond changed lives enough that many older people have to go back to work or work longer.
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Old 12-03-2018, 11:50 AM
 
71,511 posts, read 71,674,131 times
Reputation: 49088
Quote:
Originally Posted by UsAll View Post
Well, buddy, I hope you get rich doing it! <----------- GET IT? BUDDY RICH? (followed by a rimshot sound for my lame pun)



P.S.-- For those who do not know, Buddy Rich was one of the greatest, most-famous, and most technically-proficient drummers who ever lived (to-date). He died in 1987 at age 69.
yep , that was my idol ..
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Old 12-03-2018, 12:33 PM
 
Location: Ypsilanti, MI
2,437 posts, read 3,660,491 times
Reputation: 4785
Quote:
Originally Posted by PatMil View Post
There are many reasons why people want to continue working in their 70's. What else meaningful can you do? In addition there are many people who want to make sure that they will never be dependent on their children as some of our parents were on us! There are also people from many countries who do not have SS or similar support schemes (Sidebar: looking at the state of this fund in the US I wouldn't be relying on it being a significant part of my long term retirement plan).

Also it seems weird to me that people like Warren Buffet and Charlie Munger and their ilk still go to work, even with their 11 figure wealth and someone who has existed in some corporate or government job believes that at that some arbitrary age they deserve to do nothing else until they die?

Having no money is one issue ... having no purpose is another thing.

The latest book I read was titled "How to Retire Crazy Wild and Free". It's a current re-print of a 2004 book so there are MANY dated references you need to overlook, but the book did have some insights. Namely, that no matter how much a person may dislike their job, the job still provides them with three important things; Structure, Purpose, and Socialization.

A person needs to find a substitute means to acquire those same three things after retirement. There is no right or wrong answer on how to do this, the book includes a 3 or 4 page worksheet to help identify specific means for the reader.

A person can do significant volunteer work, extensive travel, return to school to learn new skills or finish studies that were stopped decades ago, begin a pursuit of artistic interests, delve deeply into new or existing hobbies, etc. But one of the most common means for retirees to acquire the three now missing elements from their lives is part-time employment.

The worst thing a retiree can do is to allow their TV, Recliner, and Refrigerator to become their three best friends.
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Old 12-03-2018, 12:36 PM
 
Location: Scottsdale, AZ
7,627 posts, read 4,686,468 times
Reputation: 27902
Quote:
Originally Posted by MichiganGreg View Post
Wow.

I have no words to describe a thoughtful response for that post.
Some people are enriched -- not just monetarily -- by having a purpose. Being idle for the next 20 years would make me want to shoot myself.

PatMil mentioned Buffett and Munger.

It seems that many people labored at jobs they didn't like, working for people they couldn't respect and so of course they couldn't wait to get out of the work world. Entrepreneurs have a different mentality. We work long hours and love it. The idea that the application of one's abilities can bring rewards commensurate to the effort gets an entrepreneur going like catnip does a cat. Rewards in the work world are rarely just or adequate considering the effort put forth. The employer has a vested interest in keeping employees ill-informed to keep labor costs down.
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Old 12-03-2018, 01:14 PM
 
8,191 posts, read 11,905,691 times
Reputation: 17964
Quote:
Originally Posted by MadManofBethesda View Post
It's amazing how many people keep falling for these threads, isn't it?

He's created 14 separate threads so far in the five days he's been a member this time. That may be a new record for him.
Well, it took TPTB a couple of extra days this time, but the OP is no longer a member of City-Data. (At least not under this SN anymore.)
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