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Old 12-02-2018, 06:56 AM
 
224 posts, read 82,188 times
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I am 60, and still working, but my biggest fear is of retiring and then having to go back out and find a job as an old old man. There is a woman in her 70's working at my local Subway shop. She has trouble making the sandwiches and with the cash register. The young kids there don't treat her very well that I can see. The thought of me as an old old man, being bossed around by some pimple faced douche is enough to keep me working at my present job. But it is scary and retirement these days can be a hard road if you make the wrong moves.
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Old 12-02-2018, 07:03 AM
 
1,951 posts, read 1,347,558 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mathjak107 View Post
i always say , for those who think it is tough working or finding a job at 62 , try it at 80 .

many of my friends who had early retirement options took it as soon as they could .

they then found the reduced pension did not buy as much lifestyle as they thought , as expenses keep going up .

so now they take bimmy low end jobs where they are under the microscope of some grunt supervisor who watches everything they do .

as low man on the totem pole they are scrutinized , end up with low pay ,crappy hours and little to no benefits .

in the mean time they thought their higher paying job with high pay , good benefits and being off the radar of bosses was just so stressful . now they are scrutinized and watched being the new guy in town .

they ended up trading one stress for another and a worse deal too .
Not retired but I want to strangle those FIRE gurus. Giving out the impression anyone can do that lifestyle while some full prey to that mentality. Sacrificing a good career in the prime years only to find low paying jobs after being out of the workforce for a lengthy period should something happen to screw up their plans.
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Old 12-02-2018, 07:05 AM
 
72,382 posts, read 72,316,796 times
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i never had much interest in those kinds of websites like mr money mustache . i don't care what others do but not for me . ha ha ha i always thought you needed a job to be considered retired from it .

i knew the kind of life i wanted in retirement and it wasn't going to be had ducking out early .
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Old 12-02-2018, 07:09 AM
 
Location: The Outer Limits
1,486 posts, read 1,838,489 times
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Being of that age group, I can tell you first hand, I haven’t heard of anyone in my industry going back for more. I retired from the electrical construction industry, by the time retirement age (58) comes around, most bodies are pretty beat up...and nobody wants you.

On the other side of the coin, when I was in the work force, I recall my FIL telling me, work as much as you can in order to finance his SS benefit.
So if those that can, do get back to work, I’m grateful.
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Old 12-02-2018, 07:13 AM
 
72,382 posts, read 72,316,796 times
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a bunch of local 3 electricians i know left the wire and pipe slinging for the factory automation world . learning to program plc's , drives and soft starts was far more lucrative and easier on the body .

i sold and designed custom control panels , i could have done this forever as it is only mental not physical .

through the years i evolved my skills as an hvac tech which i hated because of the physical demands and entered a far less physical field although related .

i still use those skills today in retirement . i teach controls and drives one day a week and love doing it .
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Old 12-02-2018, 07:15 AM
 
Location: Ft. Myers
17,797 posts, read 11,304,779 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nightengale212 View Post
I honestly don't know any people that retired from my profession of nursing who retired before 60 and attempted to return back to the profession at a full time capacity. I have known several nurses after retiring from full time employment that immediately transitioned to part time or per diem nursing work while their skills were still fresh and still held active nursing licenses because once you give up your license trying to get it reinstated years later can be very difficult often involving taking expensive refresher courses.

Most of the 20 R.N.s in my department are in the age range of mid 50s to mid 60s and plan to work to at least 65 including myself. And the reason for this is we are all pretty aware that if we wanted to or needed to
return to full time nursing work very few places will even consider hiring nurses >60 that have been out of the workforce for a few years because it is very costly to retrain them and will get very little back in return of service years for their investment.

Sometimes people return to work for other reasons than finances. I am fine financially, and retired twice. But after 3 1/2 years the first time, an old employer called me and asked if I would come back to work for them, and I did. Then, a few years later, I retired for another 1 1/2 years, and I got bored, so I called up another old contact and have been working 40 hours per week for the past 6 years.


I guess some people actually like having no place to be every day, and I understand that, but retirement didn't work for me. My health was slipping (lack of exercise), my mental skills were slipping (lack of solving problems daily and interaction with others all day long) and I could only play with my toys so much before that got old.


I have a friend who is a multi billionaire, and he and I were just talking about this subject the other day. He and I are both 73, and he still runs a bunch of businesses and is active from early in the morning until late at night. He and I agreed that our work ethic is what keeps us as healthy and as sharp as we are.


So, don't assume every old person you see working is doing it out of desperation. Some of us love to work.
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Old 12-02-2018, 07:16 AM
 
Location: The Ozone Layer, apparently...
1,906 posts, read 684,605 times
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I look forward to retiring early, and maybe working part-time if need be. I was thinking maybe of going to Bartender School, so I could get a skill that goes with a flexible schedule. Hair dresser was another skill that crossed my mind. I also plan of living in a much less expensive place, and trying to live rather modestly in that place, which will be hard since once liquidating where I am, it will be very tempting to travel a lot, and eat out a lot and relish all those things one relishes when being in the mindset of being on a permanent vacation.

I think that MOST people who are looking to return to the workforce are those that are accustomed to a certain lifestyle. It could also be those that still have some assets, so they don't qualify for much in the way of government assistance, and find they are not quite able to do as much as they used to based on the fixed income they started receiving some years earlier which stretched a little further.

I don't think it will be easy to return to what they had. For most of them, they will find a more stressful environment than they ever knew before, should they be lucky enough to get something similar back. Even if they do get it back, from what I have seen, it will be for much more responsibility and much lower pay than they previously enjoyed. It would be better if they could just get used to living on less and finding cheaper pass-times, and finding a job that wont raise their blood pressure much.
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Old 12-02-2018, 07:20 AM
 
72,382 posts, read 72,316,796 times
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my wife and i ended up turning our hobbies in to little income generators .

we both love photography and as a by product we sell files and photo's on our website . we are out shooting every chance we get anyway .

i got back in to my drumming again and will be embarking on a 50th anniversary tour with a well known group doing some sets with them .. plus i teach motor controls and drives one day a week for local distributors .

i don't consider any of it work . the fact i get paid is a bonus .
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Old 12-02-2018, 07:20 AM
 
Location: North Texas
134 posts, read 54,032 times
Reputation: 1091
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stockyman View Post
Not retired but I want to strangle those FIRE gurus. Giving out the impression anyone can do that lifestyle while some full prey to that mentality. Sacrificing a good career in the prime years only to find low paying jobs after being out of the workforce for a lengthy period should something happen to screw up their plans.

Me too. I like to read between the lines on their websites. Note how many are: a) extolling the wonders of early retirement and, b) constantly pushing you to buy their new book about it. The most hilarious of the FIRE websites details the author's successful retirement and that he just drives for Uber because it's fun or something.
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Old 12-02-2018, 07:23 AM
 
Location: Ft. Myers
17,797 posts, read 11,304,779 times
Reputation: 37971
Quote:
Originally Posted by jmp61616 View Post
I am 60, and still working, but my biggest fear is of retiring and then having to go back out and find a job as an old old man. There is a woman in her 70's working at my local Subway shop. She has trouble making the sandwiches and with the cash register. The young kids there don't treat her very well that I can see. The thought of me as an old old man, being bossed around by some pimple faced douche is enough to keep me working at my present job. But it is scary and retirement these days can be a hard road if you make the wrong moves.

No, you are looking at it backwards. Every day that we get older, we learn something every one of those days. I am much smarter and experienced than I was at 20, or 40, or even 60. I am also more stable, and a better employee. I'm 73 and could go out and find a new job tomorrow because I believe in myself.


Every day at work, some younger person will come to me with some question, and they always ask "How do you know so much ?" I tell them that, as time goes by, life gets easier and less confusing, just hang in there and you will learn a lot too.


Yes, our bodies may complain from time to time, but if we keep exercising our brain, it compensates for that.
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