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Old 12-02-2018, 11:01 AM
 
13,318 posts, read 25,550,246 times
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I am 65, retired from a grueling RN night job last January, and have a pension and Soc. Sec. I worked like crazy the last couple of years, paid off everything but mortgage, and sold my house back East (that's my backup money) and moved to a small house which I love in Colorado, which I also love.

I could not work, and have been tempted. I started to transfer my RN license to Colorado, and got stalled out in the fingerprint stage. My license is good in Mass. until 2020, and I could forever renew it there. There is no work for me within 80 miles where I am but do think I should get a CO license just in case. My job was psychiatric/detox, and there is no care around here at all. If there were, I think I'd like to work a day a week or so, for financial reasons, and to be around "my people." There was supposed to be a new medical center in 2018 about 35 miles away with a few psych/detox beds, but they still haven't agreed on a location, never mind a building, so that was vaguely my plan for my license. There is hospice work that I would qualify for, but one reason I am happy to be retired is not having to go out at night in bad weather and drive all over to make a living, and hospice could certainly involve that. Still, I think I should get on it and get a CO license.

I was doing some from-home transcribing, which was very low money and unsuitable work (poor audio). I am currently getting signed with another home transcribing service, which will also be low money but better audio and management. I can't see arguing with grocery money that I can get working from home, in pajamas with the dogs around, and not having to get out in the weather or put miles on the car. (I went out the other night to a lecture and drove the 25 miles home in the dark, two-lane road, and re-realized that my night vision isn't great and the curving road made me fear that others were going to drive right into me. It was different when I was working nights- a well-lit highway to work).

I just cannot get comfortable with a fixed income. True, I could have fewer dogs, and might let the group downsize (three are almost 15 years old) and dog expenses/proper maintenance has been pricey). Just seems like, while I'm of an age to still make some money, I should, although almost every bit of me resists the idea of *having* to do anything.

At my former job, there were many people, mostly RNs, well over 65, usually working part-time or on-call. Two were obviously slipping mentally, and the new clunky electronic medical records system did push a few out to retirement. I always wondered why they were still working- as far as I knew, they could afford not to, but who knows.
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Old 12-02-2018, 11:08 AM
 
Location: SoCal
13,216 posts, read 6,313,926 times
Reputation: 9827
Quote:
Originally Posted by mathjak107 View Post
i always say , for those who think it is tough working or finding a job at 62 , try it at 80 .

many of my friends who had early retirement options took it as soon as they could .

they then found the reduced pension did not buy as much lifestyle as they thought , as expenses keep going up .

so now they take bimmy low end jobs where they are under the microscope of some grunt supervisor who watches everything they do .

as low man on the totem pole they are scrutinized , end up with low pay ,crappy hours and little to no benefits .

in the mean time they thought their higher paying job with high pay , good benefits and being off the radar of bosses was just so stressful . now they are scrutinized and watched being the new guy in town .

they ended up trading one stress for another and a worse deal too .
Itís sad, too many people canít wait until they FIRE and then found out otherwise. Not just money problem alone but there tons of other issues as well. One of the things my brother found as as a surprise that most of his retired friends are now divorced. Maybe this is what he stays working, not for money reason.
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Old 12-02-2018, 11:14 AM
 
Location: SoCal
13,216 posts, read 6,313,926 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stockyman View Post
Not retired but I want to strangle those FIRE gurus. Giving out the impression anyone can do that lifestyle while some full prey to that mentality. Sacrificing a good career in the prime years only to find low paying jobs after being out of the workforce for a lengthy period should something happen to screw up their plans.
Yeap, when I mentioned this on some retired forum, I got pushed back as if my lifestyle is too expensive. They thought they have simple need, they can hike all day. They forgot that some us used to hike and camp for fun when we were younger. Some claims they didn’t want to do non meaningful jobs. I never had a meaningful job except for the one at JPL when I designed part of the deep space network, that’s kind of cool. Every single project I had in my working years ended up got cancelled or was a flop marketingwise. Meaningful, no. But the money was helpful to my family. And that’s meaningful enough for me. Too elitist attitude from some of these FIRE people for me.

Last edited by NewbieHere; 12-02-2018 at 11:34 AM..
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Old 12-02-2018, 11:15 AM
 
Location: Verde Valley AZ
8,614 posts, read 9,676,241 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Vision67 View Post
Wal-Mart uses that pool of too early retirees to become greeters.

"Welcome to Wal-Mart"

That is a grim future I planned to never experience.

They aren't all hired as greeters. They work all over the store. My store has a lot of 65 to 80+ working different jobs. It isn't THAT bad to work there. Well, sometimes. lol
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Old 12-02-2018, 11:17 AM
 
Location: New Mexico
6,558 posts, read 3,656,219 times
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I know a few retired people in their 60s that do not yet recieve social security that are looking for work and one other who is older that is always looking for remodeling and carpenter work. I worked part-time after retiring early from age 52 to 58 but mostly for the social contact and a little pocket money. At 70, now, I don't think I would be a very good employee and would probably have a bad attitude...been my own boss too long.
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Old 12-02-2018, 11:19 AM
 
Location: SoCal
13,216 posts, read 6,313,926 times
Reputation: 9827
Quote:
Originally Posted by don1945 View Post
Sometimes people return to work for other reasons than finances. I am fine financially, and retired twice. But after 3 1/2 years the first time, an old employer called me and asked if I would come back to work for them, and I did. Then, a few years later, I retired for another 1 1/2 years, and I got bored, so I called up another old contact and have been working 40 hours per week for the past 6 years.


I guess some people actually like having no place to be every day, and I understand that, but retirement didn't work for me. My health was slipping (lack of exercise), my mental skills were slipping (lack of solving problems daily and interaction with others all day long) and I could only play with my toys so much before that got old.


I have a friend who is a multi billionaire, and he and I were just talking about this subject the other day. He and I are both 73, and he still runs a bunch of businesses and is active from early in the morning until late at night. He and I agreed that our work ethic is what keeps us as healthy and as sharp as we are.


So, don't assume every old person you see working is doing it out of desperation. Some of us love to work.
Exactly. People don’t think about getting bored. In fact, if you mention the word getting bored, it’s as if something is wrong with your life. I don’t like the mindset people set sometimes. I get bored, how else to explain I spend 7-8 hours on my iPad. But at least I admit it, I’m human.
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Old 12-02-2018, 11:25 AM
 
Location: SoCal
13,216 posts, read 6,313,926 times
Reputation: 9827
Quote:
Originally Posted by mathjak107 View Post
yeah i am sure driving for uber is fun ...
It’s not bad for one guy we met driving us from LAX to our house. He pocketed $80 for that drive. He works when he wants to. He comes home before 2-3pm. He’s retired but his wife still earns very good income. He would be bored if he doesn’t do anything. I now don’t make negative comment about retirees driving for Uber.

Last edited by NewbieHere; 12-02-2018 at 11:35 AM..
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Old 12-02-2018, 11:28 AM
 
Location: Verde Valley AZ
8,614 posts, read 9,676,241 times
Reputation: 10955
Quote:
Originally Posted by Over the hill gang View Post
We had a great greater at our store and everyone loved him. He said he took the job to get out of the house and be around people and he could make you smile even if you were having a bad day. He died shortly after they decided to do away with greeters. We don't go to Walmart often, there are a just a few things we pick up there now and then. I did read that they planned to hire greeters again but it hasn't happened in our town.

Our store never got rid of their greeters but now they are trained to be partly asset protection as well. For all the good that does since they are not allowed to do anything about shoplifters and rude customers.
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Old 12-02-2018, 11:31 AM
 
Location: Verde Valley AZ
8,614 posts, read 9,676,241 times
Reputation: 10955
Quote:
Originally Posted by fluffythewondercat View Post
Someday I'm going to write a parody of "Strangers in the Night" called "Strangers in My Car".

I kind of don't understand this. What's the difference between a "stranger" in a Uber/Lyft situation and a regular cab? People get into a cab and think nothing of it. What's the difference?
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Old 12-02-2018, 11:40 AM
 
13,880 posts, read 7,391,112 times
Reputation: 25361
Quote:
Originally Posted by NewbieHere View Post
Yeap, when I mentioned this on some retired forum, I got pushed back as if my lifestyle is too expensive. They thought they have simple need, they can hike all day. They forgot that some us used to hike and camp for fun when we were younger. Some claims they didnít want to do non meaningful jobs. I never had a meaningful job except for the one at JPL when I designed part of the deep space network, thatís kind of cool. Every single project I had in my working years ended up got cancelled or was a flop marketingwise. Meaningful, no. But the money was helpful to my family. And thatís meaningful enough for me. Too elitist attitude from these FIRE people for me.

At age 60 1/2, my lifestyle cash burn is about 1.5x what my "Geoff never works again" cash flow looks like if I stop working today. By any rational metric, I'm at FIRE now but I'd prefer to not give up or downgrade the lifestyle things I've done my entire life.


The core of my financial planning is a bunch of high income years that put my Social Security check very close to the max. Assuming I defer to age 70, I'll have a COLA-protected and tax free $44K coming in. I may need to curtail some expensive lifestyle things eventually but I'll never need to go back into the work force.
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