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Old 12-02-2018, 12:46 PM
 
Location: SoCal
13,216 posts, read 6,313,926 times
Reputation: 9827

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Quote:
Originally Posted by mathjak107 View Post
nor pay for hair coloring , mannies ,pedies , weekly delivery from ups of more clothes , shoes , only 1 person to feed and 1/2 the bill eating out ..... i am surprised they don't cut benefits besides the loss of one check . ha ha

on the other hand i would have to canvas the local college for another wife and buy a sports car ,,, i think i will keep this one , bills and all . .
Hey, I ask for seniors discount every chance I get. I need to monetize my husband’s senior status. As recently as when we went to a paint store, I asked for a senior discount, sure enough the cashier found one, we walked out with $4 discount and a smile on our face. Got to love the seniors discount. I’ve always done it as a lark, but always pleasantly surprised to get one.
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Old 12-02-2018, 12:56 PM
 
13,318 posts, read 25,550,246 times
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I know of more people (women) who worked in a sort of half-baked way, not higher-powered professional jobs, who take jobs that would have once been considered side jobs, like home health assistance, driving older people places, etc. One I'm thinking of did those kinds of jobs for her last 20 years of working until she stopped working at 63 and filed for Soc. Sec. for financial necessity. She had worked about ten years as a rental agent and made decent money, bought a two-family house back when and seems to want to rely on very small rental income/Soc.Sec. and finding it not real workable. And she lives as close to the bone as could be imagined.

There are a lot of people like her who might not have bought the two-family house, or who got divorced at a key late time.

I don't know anyone who left the professional world and tried to get back in at a late time. (Come to think of it, the women I'm thinking of and know are all artistically oriented. I do think the visual arts people are the least well adapted to reality, if not well married financially).
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Old 12-02-2018, 01:24 PM
 
Location: SoCal
13,216 posts, read 6,313,926 times
Reputation: 9827
Quote:
Originally Posted by jghorton View Post
I've known a number of 'street' people (missions, halfway houses, etc), who have found themselves at 60+ with little or no savings or serious income. They typically share living arrangements (or live in subsidized housing) and rely on SS or SDIC, plus food stamps, food pantries and other welfare programs. It's not pretty, but, the viable opportunities for sustainable employment at 70 (after several years outside the workforce) are slim and none.

I don't know of anyone who chose to retire early ... and then was desperate to return to work at age 70. By 62+, most people know their future chances of re-entering the workplace in a viable role are virtually non-existent.

I suppose some suddenly find themselves in extreme involuntarily circumstances.
But, it's difficult to imagine many people could live that long, yet, have absolutely no plans or provision for when they inevitably stop working.

(I wonder whether these "many 70-year old's who have run out of money and are desperate to return to the workforce," are real people - or anecdotal caricatures).
Iíve been thinking about this. My area has high employement, so if you are going to need to work, itís best to live in non rural areas. You wonít see seniors working at fast food places here, as least not common, but you will find them at places like Costco, and other places that are not exciting for young people.
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Old 12-02-2018, 01:38 PM
 
Location: Scottsdale, AZ
7,627 posts, read 4,686,468 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AZDesertBrat View Post
I kind of don't understand this. What's the difference between a "stranger" in a Uber/Lyft situation and a regular cab? People get into a cab and think nothing of it. What's the difference?
Uh, the cabbie often doesn't own the cab? He's not driving his personal car?

Although I suppose if a drunken party girl vomits in the back seat a cabbie still has to clean it up, just like the Uber driver.
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Old 12-02-2018, 02:08 PM
 
3,143 posts, read 1,451,285 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Specific Point View Post
I have been talking about retirement and employment with many of my friends, neighbors, and family recently and I have been shocked by how many of them have nearly run out of money and are trying desperately to get a full-time job.

Many of them are in their late 60s and 70s. A number of things happened to them that has caused an urgent need to get a full-time job. These include:

1) Their spouse died and they no longer have his/her Social Security and or Pension or Annuity check. And they did not buy life insurance to make up for the difference.

2) They were told by friends (or Dave Ramsey) that the stock market returned 9% a year so they took out that amount in withdrawals, instead of the conservative 3-4% recommended figure.

3) They did not budget their money and overspent.

4) They had huge emergency expenses, such as medical costs without a Medicare supplement.

Do you think the people I know who are trying to get back into the workforce in their 70s due to poor financial planning or emergencies are all that unusual? Do you think it is possible for someone in their 70s to get another full-time professional job in their field? Any advice or observations?



I think they made their bed to lie in it and I don't feel sorry for them. Our generation is having to pick up the pieces. They are living much longer and we are having to and will pay out of the *** for their benefits all the while they vote for politicians who maintain the status quo (what they want). They should get everything they want and their "not entitled" but our generation is.
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Old 12-02-2018, 02:11 PM
 
3,143 posts, read 1,451,285 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Vision67 View Post
Wal-Mart uses that pool of too early retirees to become greeters.

"Welcome to Wal-Mart"

That is a grim future I planned to never experience.

And I am glad you don't have to. You stand in the same place all day and have to deal with rude customers.
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Old 12-02-2018, 02:13 PM
 
3,143 posts, read 1,451,285 times
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Let them find a way to make it. People in that generation are ALWAYS telling us to "pull ourselves by the bootstraps" and taught their children their selfish ways. Practice what you preach!
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Old 12-02-2018, 02:16 PM
 
Location: SoCal
13,216 posts, read 6,313,926 times
Reputation: 9827
Quote:
Originally Posted by jghorton View Post
I've known a number of 'street' people (missions, halfway houses, etc), who have found themselves at 60+ with little or no savings or serious income. They typically share living arrangements (or live in subsidized housing) and rely on SS or SDIC, plus food stamps, food pantries and other welfare programs. It's not pretty, but, the viable opportunities for sustainable employment at 70 (after several years outside the workforce) are slim and none.

I don't know of anyone who chose to retire early ... and then was desperate to return to work at age 70. By 62+, most people know their future chances of re-entering the workplace in a viable role are virtually non-existent.

I suppose some suddenly find themselves in extreme involuntarily circumstances.
But, it's difficult to imagine many people could live that long, yet, have absolutely no plans or provision for when they inevitably stop working.

(I wonder whether these "many 70-year old's who have run out of money and are desperate to return to the workforce," are real people - or anecdotal caricatures)
.
I think the media tends to misrepresent things as always, many people who are close to retirement and know they donít have enough, stay working part time or work on and off, on call, temp, contact. I know lots of people in this category from age 66-76.
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Old 12-02-2018, 02:30 PM
 
Location: Loudon, TN
5,769 posts, read 4,827,803 times
Reputation: 19395
We live a bit over an hour from Dollywood. Numerous seniors work there, doing everything from ticket sales, gate checks, food stands, retail sales in the gift shops, driving the parking shuttle, guest "hosts" (give directions, help find lost kids/parents, etc), ushers at the show theaters, etc. The park leaves the jobs requiring quick reflexes and crowd management, like the roller coasters, etc, to the more able bodied young folks, but there are so many seniors there it's awesome. This kind of work is readily available in any touristy areas with theme parks, or other similar attractions. They all seem to be having a good time, so whether it's for the money or socialization, I don't know, but they seem to like it.

I personally don't know anyone who has gone back to work in their late 60s to 70s because of financial needs, but some work at the golf course for free golf! I do have one friend that I know retired early with a smallish pension. She's not SS eligible for another year or two, but she has a little jewelry consignment business, and she recently wrote a children's book, which her daughter illustrated, and she is making her dogs (the stars of the book) into a cottage industry. She sells the books, framed artwork from the book, accessories, and t-shirts, etc, which all act as further publicity for her book. She networks with book signings at all sorts of boutiques, book stores, independent coffee houses, etc. I'm kind of amazed by her ingenuity, and awesome schmoozing skills. I don't know if she's actually pulling down much money, but what she does make is all hers, no bosses, no schedules, and she is doing something she loves.

Last edited by TheShadow; 12-02-2018 at 02:49 PM..
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Old 12-02-2018, 02:47 PM
 
Location: Tennessee
23,572 posts, read 17,544,804 times
Reputation: 27640
Quote:
Originally Posted by AlaskaErik View Post
I don't know of anyone who went back to work because of financial difficulties. My wife went back to work because she likes to keep busy. We certainly didn't need the money.
I see a lot. I'm not in affluent necks of the woods a lot of the other posters are on here. A lot of seniors are working, or at least trying to work, not because of boredom or wanting to try a new thing, but because of immediate and pressing financial needs.
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