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Old 12-04-2018, 09:50 AM
 
Location: SoCal
13,928 posts, read 6,661,847 times
Reputation: 10564

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OP, I intend to delay taking my SS until age 70 to help combat this longevity problem, but I don’t see it’s a problem.
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Old 12-04-2018, 09:54 AM
 
3,101 posts, read 1,094,197 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NewbieHere View Post
Not going through and self termination is a different story altogether. You mentioned Oregon, I assume that means assisted suicide.
Both my mom and dad refused aggressive treatment to treat their problem. My mom refused chemotherapy, too agggressive for her, but she did have radiation. Died 2 years later from cancer. My dad did the same, had kidney proble, refused surgery, but he did have dialysis 3 times a week, he died of old age. Just woke up one day, refused to eat and died in the afternoon. Died 3 years after he needed surgery.
Yes those two are different choices. My point is that we are all different and that just living longer is not necessarily good.
My friend chose to not due the cancer treatment that might have extended his life but necessarily the quality of it.
Self determination is another matter but I certainly wouldn’t blame someone that takes that route over a longer life in dementia.

I could see others that because of religious reasons might not choose such an option and others that would think any chance at a longer life is worth any type of sufferering it may bring.

I can only speak for myself
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Old 12-04-2018, 09:59 AM
 
Location: SoCal
13,928 posts, read 6,661,847 times
Reputation: 10564
A lady in my bridge club has Alzheimer’s, she still plays very good bridge, kick my arse sometimes. The only thing I notice is her repetitive motion of her mouth. Maybe dementia is not a cliff. I don’t know, but her daughter takes her her to excercise and play bridge at the senior center. Other people who doesn’t have Alzheimer’s nor dementia but are already so forgetful and I have to mind them as they play, like going from the board or from their hand. They can’t even keep it straight.

I accept some degradation as I age, but my religion does not encourage self termination.
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Old 12-04-2018, 10:05 AM
 
Location: La Jolla
344 posts, read 170,716 times
Reputation: 629
If you work in a technical job you have to keep up your skills regardless of your age. My husband is 61 and an electrical engineer managing a group that works on some very innovative technology. He is both a hardware and software engineer. Back when phone apps first started he taught himself how to write apps just for fun. He loves what he does and plans to continue to learn so that he can do some consulting one day when we are retired. He has been with several start up companies over the years. Some made it to the point of getting bought out and some did not. He had to find a new job 7 years ago at 54 when the start up he was with went bust. He was able to land a new position because he is diligent about keeping his skills up.
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Old 12-04-2018, 10:12 AM
 
11,305 posts, read 8,728,196 times
Reputation: 28532
Quote:
Originally Posted by Serious Conversation View Post
https://www.nytimes.com/2018/10/23/n...mentsContainer

I was rereading the above article from the NYT this morning. Though it's sensational, IT/tech workers are extremely vulnerable to ageism and being thrust out of the workforce. To some extent, there is a significant bias against older workers throughout the labor force. Many folks get pushed out of "career oriented" work sometime before 60. Finding a new job in your 50s, or even 40s, can be dicey in some fields.

On the other end, people are living longer. It's not uncommon to see people very healthy throughout their 70s, and even into their 80s. 3/4 my grandparents are alive at 82-83, and none of them have any serious medical problems to my knowledge. The odds are pretty high that they all make it to 85, and someone getting to over 90 wouldn't surprise me.

Where do these trends collide in your retirement planning?
Poor example. He voluntarily left two good jobs. Then he couldn't find anything else. We can't blame this on age discrimination. He should have considered his retirement when he was turning down jobs in his 50s.
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Old 12-04-2018, 10:15 AM
 
12,227 posts, read 5,324,490 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Beach Sportsfan View Post
Straw people?
Suddenly, the Wizard of Oz came to mind
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Old 12-04-2018, 11:06 AM
 
73,083 posts, read 72,896,125 times
Reputation: 50641
Quote:
Originally Posted by Beach Sportsfan View Post
But yet you quoted tour father in law as an example who under your terms would be “straw” people to me.

I’ll stop now because this is going nowhere I will speak for myself.

Longer life is not necessarily better for me, and if I’m presented with similar circumstances as my friend I would probably choose the same. But to each his/ her own.
when i say straw people they are more about those that get referred to in general terms , like people have no retirement savings or people can't find jobs . they are usually a reference to just some general statement as opposed to speaking from one's experience about specific people .
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Old 12-04-2018, 11:59 AM
 
Location: colorado springs, CO
5,208 posts, read 2,399,355 times
Reputation: 17288
I'm probably completely screwed.

I left the workforce at age 38 to caregive (family, uncompensated) thinking that I was going to tap into options & resources & be back to work within a year.

That was 13 years ago. There were no options or resources or rather I was the resource. Even if Mary Poppins & Florence Nightengale were to arrive on my doorstep this afternoon; what are the odds that a now 51-year-old woman who has not been employed for 13 years would be hired?

I suspect; not good odds. I guess I'm all blown to heck & just the thought of that ... blows.
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Old 12-04-2018, 12:42 PM
 
Location: Ypsilanti, MI
2,521 posts, read 3,728,717 times
Reputation: 4972
To the OP's question of "Where do these trends collide?" I say a person's mid-50's.

Instead of trying to accumulate enough wealth by age 65 to fund your desired retirement for 30 years, a person now seems to need to accumulate enough wealth by their mid-50's to fund a sustainment level retirement for 40 years.

Part time jobs or lower paying jobs after a person's forced mid-50's retirement (if it happens) will allow a standard of living increase above sustainment level. But a person needs to be ready for the worst. Additional degrees, licenses, certifications, training, remaining current in their field, etc. are all means to prevent or forestall the RIF, as well as being means to secure a late in life career change.


Benn there, done that, have a collection of hard hats in my basement to prove it. Three different employers since my 56th birthday.
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Old 12-04-2018, 12:57 PM
 
2,001 posts, read 1,333,751 times
Reputation: 3437
Quote:
Originally Posted by Serious Conversation View Post
https://www.nytimes.com/2018/10/23/n...mentsContainer

I was rereading the above article from the NYT this morning. Though it's sensational, IT/tech workers are extremely vulnerable to ageism and being thrust out of the workforce. To some extent, there is a significant bias against older workers throughout the labor force. Many folks get pushed out of "career oriented" work sometime before 60. Finding a new job in your 50s, or even 40s, can be dicey in some fields.

On the other end, people are living longer. It's not uncommon to see people very healthy throughout their 70s, and even into their 80s. 3/4 my grandparents are alive at 82-83, and none of them have any serious medical problems to my knowledge. The odds are pretty high that they all make it to 85, and someone getting to over 90 wouldn't surprise me.

Where do these trends collide in your retirement planning?
I've always wondered about this..... and they seem to keep moving SS later all the time. Doesn't something need to be in place to keep the person employed?

The way I look at it, ageism won't go away. So we better stay on top of ourselves to look viable. Stay fit and as young looking as possible.

I'd like to say I could live 40 years off my retirement income, but I know that's not happening.
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