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Old 12-04-2018, 02:54 PM
 
6,267 posts, read 4,740,348 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by coschristi View Post
I'm probably completely screwed.

I left the workforce at age 38 to caregive (family, uncompensated) thinking that I was going to tap into options & resources & be back to work within a year.

That was 13 years ago. There were no options or resources or rather I was the resource. Even if Mary Poppins & Florence Nightengale were to arrive on my doorstep this afternoon; what are the odds that a now 51-year-old woman who has not been employed for 13 years would be hired?

I suspect; not good odds. I guess I'm all blown to heck & just the thought of that ... blows.
Your "odds" depend on your skills. That would be true at 31, or 41, or 51. Age is not the issue. Do you have the skills that are in demand. If not, you need to consider going back to school or finding another way to gain needed skills.
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Old 12-04-2018, 05:37 PM
 
71,655 posts, read 71,801,099 times
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that is 100% correct ... it depends not on age but skills and what you can bring to the party .

the company i work for will gladly higher seniors and in fact for those with the skills and a customer following you can do very well .

i put this up in another thread today .

Quote:
Originally Posted by mathjak107 View Post
by the way , if anyone was in the factory automation , or electrical supply or pump/ motor industry the company is usually hiring and if you can bring something worthwhile to the party they may have a place for you . it helps to have had a following or connections to bring in business . we have employees in their 80's .

they have offices in long island , brooklyn , manhattan , queens , ohio , 2 in new jersey , Connecticut , rhode island , syracuse ny , auburn ny , buffalo ny , rochchester ny . just d/m me . i can't vouch for anyone here of course but i can at least get you noticed .

it is all owned by one man and i started 24 years ago with him and we were about a 6-8 million dollar company , he is on track to do about 113 million a year now .
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Old 12-04-2018, 07:34 PM
 
11,937 posts, read 20,400,010 times
Reputation: 19334
Quote:
Originally Posted by Travelassie View Post
"Slightly" diabetic??
Yes, controlled by diet, numbers arenít high enough for meds. Also known as prediabetic. My mom was an my two sister are prediabetic, and I am diabetic, but if my numbers go back down to pre level, I may be able go off meds.

Some people have low numbers and only achieve that through meds, diet and exercise.
__________________
Solly says ó Be nice!
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Old 12-05-2018, 01:50 AM
 
38,232 posts, read 14,941,272 times
Reputation: 24637
IT folks face a tough road to retirement.

It's a rapidly changing field and easy to get left behind. A layoff, working for a company with outdated technology that goes under, the difficulty keeping up with all the changes as a brain ages, ... All sorts of factors make it difficult to stay employed in IT until retirement.

In order to stay employed, making career changes such as into management or ??? might make more sense than struggling to stay employed in IT.
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Old 12-05-2018, 02:04 AM
 
38,232 posts, read 14,941,272 times
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As to those who step away from employment to care for children or aging parents and find themselves in their 50's with no recent work history and only a decade or so to get a retirement together, there is no time to lose.

Get down to the career center at the local college and ask to take some some interest inventories, aptitude tests, etc.

There are two year degree programs that might be a good fit and no one expects you to have years of experience coming out of college.

Occupational Therapy Assistants, for example. An aging population is increasing demand for OTAs to assist with exercises and therapies to improve a person's ability to perform daily tasks. Decent pay

Funeral service workers -- Morticians, undertakers and funeral service managers -- always in demand and often pay well.

...
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Old 12-05-2018, 02:10 AM
 
71,655 posts, read 71,801,099 times
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i guess you can say that is a career people are dying to get in .

perhaps that is because they are down to a skeleton crew
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Old 12-05-2018, 04:26 AM
 
Location: Colorado Springs
4,846 posts, read 4,962,112 times
Reputation: 17327
Quote:
Originally Posted by LaJollaEast View Post
If you work in a technical job you have to keep up your skills regardless of your age. My husband is 61 and an electrical engineer managing a group that works on some very innovative technology. He is both a hardware and software engineer. Back when phone apps first started he taught himself how to write apps just for fun. He loves what he does and plans to continue to learn so that he can do some consulting one day when we are retired. He has been with several start up companies over the years. Some made it to the point of getting bought out and some did not. He had to find a new job 7 years ago at 54 when the start up he was with went bust. He was able to land a new position because he is diligent about keeping his skills up.
Same here. I'll be 69 this month (the only funny age ) and I too have kept my skills up to date. Why? Because I really love what I do and it is also my hobby.

I retired at 66 but one year ago my old company begged me to come back part time, 20 hours per week. I'm having a ball! I feel like a 10 year old kid again getting paid for playing. I also have a very sharp 24 year old engineer to train.

I really do recommend engineering as a career. We do interesting stuff, we are paid well, and if you keep your skills current and can consistently deliver results, you will be able to find employment at any age.
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Old 12-05-2018, 06:27 AM
 
38,232 posts, read 14,941,272 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mathjak107 View Post
i guess you can say that is a career people are dying to get in .

perhaps that is because they are down to a skeleton crew


It's not for everybody, and there are certifications and so forth, but for those who find fulfillment in helping people during a sad time, it can be rewarding.
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Old 12-05-2018, 06:29 AM
 
38,232 posts, read 14,941,272 times
Reputation: 24637
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vision67 View Post
Same here. I'll be 69 this month (the only funny age ) and I too have kept my skills up to date. Why? Because I really love what I do and it is also my hobby.

I retired at 66 but one year ago my old company begged me to come back part time, 20 hours per week. I'm having a ball! I feel like a 10 year old kid again getting paid for playing. I also have a very sharp 24 year old engineer to train.

I really do recommend engineering as a career. We do interesting stuff, we are paid well, and if you keep your skills current and can consistently deliver results, you will be able to find employment at any age.
Good for you.

Keeping skills current is the key.
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Old 12-05-2018, 07:21 AM
 
Location: Tennessee
23,592 posts, read 17,589,896 times
Reputation: 27682
Quote:
Originally Posted by LaJollaEast View Post
If you work in a technical job you have to keep up your skills regardless of your age. My husband is 61 and an electrical engineer managing a group that works on some very innovative technology. He is both a hardware and software engineer. Back when phone apps first started he taught himself how to write apps just for fun. He loves what he does and plans to continue to learn so that he can do some consulting one day when we are retired. He has been with several start up companies over the years. Some made it to the point of getting bought out and some did not. He had to find a new job 7 years ago at 54 when the start up he was with went bust. He was able to land a new position because he is diligent about keeping his skills up.
This is true, but many companies pidgeonhole tech staff. If you haven't done "X" before, no one assumes you'll ever be able to do "X."

Take someone who works as an analyst for HR software. Job postings will want an expert in a specific vendor's product, and often so many years experience in whatever version they use.

If you're supporting HR systems from Oracle, you probably won't know much about Infor Lawson or Workday.
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