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Old 12-05-2018, 04:35 PM
 
2,130 posts, read 732,612 times
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Retired mid-2014 at age 61. Definitely happy, Major factors:
1. Enough assets and income that, according to my financial advisor's Monte Carlo model, I'm unlikely to outlive my savings at current spending levels.
2. Wonderful relationship with my son, DIL and granddaughters.
3. Plenty of opportunities to learn, do, give back, etc.
4. Excellent health. I work at it but part of it is still luck and good genes.
5. Enough discretionary income to travel, give generously to charity and do nice things for th granddaughters.

Two are money-related but what I realized after watching my DH grow old (he was 15 years older), was that ample money can make your old age far more comfortable. I've always been driven by a fear of being old and poor. Travel and charitable donations make up about 40% of my spending so I can cut back if needed, but I hope I never have to.
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Old 12-05-2018, 05:00 PM
 
Location: sarasota
1,004 posts, read 1,281,848 times
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health enough si i don't have to worry while i live in italy or spain
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Old 12-05-2018, 05:14 PM
 
2,871 posts, read 1,015,737 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by katharsis View Post
For my husband and me -- we have the same goals -- it would have:

1. Enough money to support us until we die.

2. Living in the location we want in the kind of house we want, and living there until we die.

3. Good food and wine, and the ability to enjoy both.

4. Good mental and physical health until we are 80, and mostly good health after that until we die.

5. Enjoyable pastimes.

6. No bothersome or annoying relatives or neighbors.

7. Contentment with what we have -- with no anger, bitterness or resentment about what we don't have.


And all of this to be followed by a peaceful and painless death.


What would your "happy retirement" be?
I would just add health and money to travel which I enjoy. But the rest itís a very good list that I would be happy if it was achieved in my retirement
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Old 12-05-2018, 06:45 PM
 
Location: AZ
675 posts, read 396,756 times
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I would give up everything, health, wealth, whatever just to have my deceased wife back for a few days. You would be amazed at how empty everything can be when you lose your life mate.

I wish you well and a great retirement.
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Old 12-05-2018, 10:15 PM
 
Location: New Mexico
6,610 posts, read 3,687,027 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jasperhobbs View Post
Good health is #1 for me. All the money in the world is worthless if you can't enjoy it.
That is surely number one. Then there are secondary goals -- stable and sufficient income, comfortable home, meaningful interests and active social connections.


Quote:
Originally Posted by fluffythewondercat View Post
Pie-in-the-sky-wise, one of the things that would make me happy in retirement would be an utterly trustworthy financial manager who would monitor our entire financial picture, warn us about impending extraordinary expenses, work with a tax advisor to make sure we don't do anything stupid, make sound investments in accordance with our risk tolerance, provide complete transparency and collect a reasonable fee.

I am probably dreaming, especially about the trustworthy and reasonable fee part. But DH doesn't like to be bothered with money details, so it usually falls on me.
the


Fluffy-- I don't see that as pie in the sky. There are trustworthy people out there. Try to get reviews of professional advisors. Find someone with a stable and good reputation. Don't abdicate responsibility to them but be engaged in the process and planning. You should get regular statements of activity and talk with them if you have questions or concerns. They have to justify and explain fees. I still use the same guy even though I moved 1000 miles away. We talk on the phone or do an online conference occasionally.
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Old 12-06-2018, 03:43 AM
 
4,447 posts, read 2,624,703 times
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Katharsus;

1) Since my health is already "in jeopardy ", id want decebt health for the rest of my life. Doubt it will happen. I have 23 chronic continuous medical conditions already, bad back, hips and knees among them. I already at 55 have been getting around with a cane for about a decade.

2) to have enogh money to live cheaply but comfortably. That would include some travel as long as i am able. Both some lical travel weekenders and a major trip every, say. 3-5 years.

3) enough food to eat. We rarely if ever drink so wine is not important to us. Im the cook in the family, may i be able to continue to cook while I am able, then if need be, be able to get MOW and or get to free dinners at churches around the areA.

4) the good ability to drive as long as im alive without becomibg a road hazzard like driving 20 in a 45. With my health i need transportation. Maybe not my own car, but ill need to get around.

5) to be able to afford my housing, be it my own house, a Senior housing or an assisted living arrangement.

6) to be able to enjoy myself and a hobby or two and the spare change to afford it. Be it reading, watching tge tv (57 cable channels and nothing on), watching movies at home or model railroading, or quilt making or whatever, lol.

7) to terminate about the same time as my OH, i dont want either of us to be lonely for years in end, outliving the other. To pass peacefully and quick, not a long slow painful one.

8) to live out my remaining days in sone comfort in a more temperate environment so as to not freeze my butt off during winter.

Theres probably more, but for now those would be the best ones that come to mind.

Right now, money and health are the two biggest ones i wish would improve for us. Working on both, but afraid money will be the harder of the two.

Best to all for whom these and theirs requirements will be met.

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Old 12-06-2018, 04:28 AM
 
Location: Arizona
5,968 posts, read 5,319,572 times
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I think I'm living it now.

Lucky enough to live in a community where there is always something to do with a low cost of living. Live well on pension and SS. Always meeting new people which is probably the greatest thing. Always people to do things with or for conversation and discussion.


The only bad parts in my life are the people you lose along the way. That is the one thing we have no control over.
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Old 12-06-2018, 06:05 AM
 
6,666 posts, read 1,381,826 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bygeorge View Post
I would give up everything, health, wealth, whatever just to have my deceased wife back for a few days. You would be amazed at how empty everything can be when you lose your life mate.

I wish you well and a great retirement.
You have my most sincere and heartfelt sympathy.

I am SO sorry for your loss, and I completely agree with your post. I just know that, like you, my life would be very poor without my husband, just as you are missing your wife; and that is why I stated that my husband and I share the same idea and have the same goals for a happy retirement. I could have enough money to keep me in comfort for 100 years and perfect health besides, but neither one would compensate for the loss of my husband.

The reason I did not more strongly imply the above in my first post, though, is because when I wrote such a thought in some previous posts, some people took that to mean that I lack interests, which I don't, and that I am a weak and dependent person, which I am not in most ways.

However, I do know that many people are very happily single and/or they have not had a truly loving bond with a spouse or SO, and so they can have a very happy retirement without sharing it with a life partner.

Last edited by katharsis; 12-06-2018 at 06:42 AM..
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Old 12-06-2018, 06:31 AM
Status: "The days are getting shorter" (set 26 days ago)
 
Location: Willamette Valley, Oregon
3,988 posts, read 1,123,009 times
Reputation: 5676
I definitely agree with the previous posts concerning loss of a mate. I would be devastated if my wife died. We've had so many wonderful years together, I can't imagine life without her. I would hope I have the strength to carry on.

That being said, we have a great retirement. The only downside is the pain of growing older. There is a certain level of body ache constantly. OTOH, I wake up and say "hey I'm still upright!"
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Old 12-06-2018, 07:09 AM
 
2,130 posts, read 732,612 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by katharsis View Post
However, I do know that many people are very happily single and/or they have not had a truly loving bond with a spouse or SO, and so they can have a very happy retirement without sharing it with a life partner.
You play the hand you've been dealt. I lost my mother and my husband within a month of each other 2 years ago- both to cancer. They'd lived good, long lives and only the last couple of months were really bad. Both chose palliative care. Mom and Dad were HS sweethearts, married over 60 years. My case was different; DH and I had been together 20 years (married the last 13) and because of the age difference I pretty much knew I needed to think about life without him at some point.

Dad moved into Assisted Living near one of my brothers. He's got activities in his retirement home- bridge and pinochle, weekly Happy Hour, etc. and also gets over to my brother and SIL's for home-cooked meals. I'll be going there at Christmas and other family members will visit. He sees his grandchildren and some of the great-grandchildren frequently. A month after Mom died he e-mailed us and said he has a happy man even though he missed Mom. Two weeks after DH died, my second granddaughter was born and I went there (3 hours away) to hold down the fort with the 2-year old. What joy! Five months after DH died I was on a ship going through the Panama Canal and scattered his ashes there and off the coast of Costa Rica. I've scattered some in 5 other countries, plus the US.

I know Dad and I are atypical but there IS life after the death of a beloved spouse.
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