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Old 12-15-2018, 10:45 AM
 
Location: Prescott AZ
6,123 posts, read 9,073,863 times
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My daughter, age 47, has just quit her very lucrative corporate job due to being overstressed and stupid, little tasks that just "got" to her. It will be interesting to see what she comes up with for employment next.

As for me, social work was always interesting and I could have gone on a few more years, except for my health. The last few years were part time, which helped immensely, but I had to give that up too, due to the pension requirements (Last 10 years of pay). I never did ugly social work, like child abuse, etc. Always had uplifting jobs with mostly pleasant supervisors.
If the job got bad, and some did, I would quit. Never could just "act". Always had to say what I thought. Got me into hot water a lot.
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Old 12-15-2018, 07:22 PM
 
Location: Cebu, Philippines
4,381 posts, read 1,663,688 times
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Yeah, but if I lie down for a few minutes, the feeling goes away.
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Old 12-15-2018, 08:43 PM
 
Location: Shreveport, LA
1,303 posts, read 986,416 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AZgarden View Post
My daughter, age 47, has just quit her very lucrative corporate job due to being overstressed and stupid, little tasks that just "got" to her. It will be interesting to see what she comes up with for employment next.

As for me, social work was always interesting and I could have gone on a few more years, except for my health. The last few years were part time, which helped immensely, but I had to give that up too, due to the pension requirements (Last 10 years of pay). I never did ugly social work, like child abuse, etc. Always had uplifting jobs with mostly pleasant supervisors.
If the job got bad, and some did, I would quit. Never could just "act". Always had to say what I thought. Got me into hot water a lot.
I almost went with social work. I went into teaching instead because I had both a bad work life and a bad home life and wanted to leave both situations. Now that I've moved out, I'm the poodle man. I love poodles.
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Old 12-16-2018, 04:47 AM
 
295 posts, read 237,382 times
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At age 22, you might consider the military. Wars can be a problem, as you might guess. However, a number of career paths can lead you into civilian jobs that will be less dangerous. Pay is not too bad (better for officers) and travel can be a real plus. I was in the USAF and Air National Guard and enjoyed it overall. Vietnam was not much fun but I would do it all over again.
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Old 12-20-2018, 09:49 AM
 
Location: Shreveport, LA
1,303 posts, read 986,416 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by walessp View Post
At age 22, you might consider the military. Wars can be a problem, as you might guess. However, a number of career paths can lead you into civilian jobs that will be less dangerous. Pay is not too bad (better for officers) and travel can be a real plus. I was in the USAF and Air National Guard and enjoyed it overall. Vietnam was not much fun but I would do it all over again.
I considered that, but I have a permanent medical disqualification and didnít have much luck with appeals. Honestly, at this point Iím looking forward to retirement so I can have freedom from work, which is what I really want.
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Old 12-20-2018, 10:14 AM
 
6,239 posts, read 4,721,373 times
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Originally Posted by Magic Qwan View Post
... Honestly, at this point Iím looking forward to retirement so I can have freedom from work, which is what I really want.
When and if you gain that freedom from work, what is it that you want to do with your life?
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Old 12-20-2018, 10:29 AM
 
Location: Shreveport, LA
1,303 posts, read 986,416 times
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Originally Posted by jrkliny View Post
When and if you gain that freedom from work, what is it that you want to do with your life?
Mostly be a homebody, having a chance to snuggle my dogs (probably different dogs by then since this is a far off dream), and generally not having a lot of demands on me. I may use my pension to travel. One of the reasons Iím trying to get out of stress eating almost every day is I donít want to be so sick I canít enjoy retirement when it finally gets here. I may have too many medical problems for the military, but they are still mild enough that I could have a nice leisurely retirement if I take better care of myself than I have been.
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Old 12-20-2018, 10:43 AM
 
2,036 posts, read 859,539 times
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Sounds like you will have a miserable life and a miserable retirement if you actually live that long.

At 22 you are just starting out. If you hate your job you are looking at things wrong or you are in the wrong field. I once spent two weeks as a telephone cust. svc. supervisor. I had to handle all the calls that the reps couldn't handle. After two weeks and a particularly obstinate caller who wouldn't accept anything I said, I broke the phone on the corner of the desk and walked up to HR and told them I couldn't take it. They re-assigned me to collections which I enjoyed because now I had the stick instead of being beaten with it.

Many people have hard people to deal with at work. Learning how to manage your boss and your co-workers is essential.

Some people are bitter about office politics and not advancing. After 43 years of work and 11 years of retirement I can tell you that titles and money are a very poor substitute for a job you take pride in and do well in and can make a decent living at, and fund a future retirement (if you get there).

Being rich is just another job. Being able to make ends meet on a modest scale and enjoying what you spend so much of your life doing at work, is one of the most important things in life. But in the end it's up to you to adapt and make the best of making a living until you hopefully find your niche and can actually feel that you love what you do. I found my niche in my early 40's and retired at 62 to a modest house in the burbs.

And no, I don't miss working. The day I retired I felt like an aristocrat who could live without having to go to work, and 10 years later I still feel that way.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Magic Qwan View Post
I’ve always looked forward to retirement since it didn’t take me long to realize I hate work in general. I hate self-employment and standard employment for different reasons I won’t go into. Now that I’ve settled into a career I tolerate fairly well, I go to work and do my duties as well as I can with the thought in the back of my mind I can go home and enjoy my toy poodles. I save religiously for retirement and am constantly makimg decisions towards what will net me a higher standard of living in retirement. I’m 22, and if I play my cards right and am diligent with my planning and changing my plan as needed, I can retire when I’m 62 (I had a bumpy start but am netting good money, now). I look forward to taking my retirement money some place with a low cost of living (likely abroad), so I can stretch the retirement longer. I bottle up my bitter feelings all day, and it will be nice to finally escape from stress. The only way I could maybe plan better for retirement is taking better is taking better care of my health since my other relaxation activity besides poodle time is cramming my face with junk food and sitting around. I expect my personal reaction to leaving work will be more of a “good riddance” feeling, but I’ve heard otherwise from some people. I was curious how common it is to miss work once you retire?


Its funny, in a way. I’m the guy at work everybody thinks loves his work, since I compartmentalize so much. Nobody ever sees how bitter and upset I stay the vast majority of the time.

Last edited by bobspez; 12-20-2018 at 10:56 AM..
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Old 12-20-2018, 11:05 AM
 
6,239 posts, read 4,721,373 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bobspez View Post
Sounds like you will have a miserable life and a miserable retirement if you actually live that long.

.......
That would be my guess also. A young person who is unhappy and cannot find a career that is satisfying is not likely to do any better in retirement. Snuggling dogs may be the best life has to offer for some people. Seems like a waste of a life to me, but to each his/her own.
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Old 12-20-2018, 12:13 PM
 
Location: Wasilla, AK
7,235 posts, read 4,128,251 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bobspez View Post
Sounds like you will have a miserable life and a miserable retirement if you actually live that long.

I'd be miserable too if I was looking at 40 more years in a classroom.
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