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Old 12-08-2018, 11:33 AM
 
Location: Omaha, Nebraska
7,318 posts, read 4,164,649 times
Reputation: 18323

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hallouise View Post
For people who retired but went back to work because they were bored (not because they needed the income), I wonder: did you consider volunteering?
Volunteering is working. It's just not working full-time for a paycheck.

Not all meaningful work is full-time, and not all meaningful work is paid. But make no mistake about it: those unpaid volunteers are often doing some of the most important work of all!
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Old 12-08-2018, 11:47 AM
 
Location: Omaha, Nebraska
7,318 posts, read 4,164,649 times
Reputation: 18323
Quote:
Originally Posted by jrkliny View Post
You should be able to do better than being bitter and upset and barely getting by. In addition to looking for a more satisfying career you might want to take a look at yourself. You might begin by taking responsibility for the situation you are in and for your unhappiness.
THIS! OP, a life of leisure may seem appealing to you now, but I doubt you'd find an endless series of days spent doing nothing more than playing with your dogs, eating junk food, and sitting around the house very appealing at all. And if by some miracle you retired right now, that is all you would have.

You need to work on building a better, more meaningful, and more fulfilling life for yourself, both at work and outside of work. Waiting forty years to do this is a mistake. The people who fare best in retirement are those who already have a wide range of interests and activities that they can turn to to fill their time once work is no longer consuming the lion's share of their waking hours.

Earning money is important, but building a REAL life for yourself is far more important!
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Old 12-08-2018, 11:50 AM
 
Location: Texas of course
564 posts, read 266,991 times
Reputation: 2897
Do I miss working, no but I do miss the ability to work because of my health.
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Old 12-08-2018, 01:32 PM
 
13,321 posts, read 25,569,771 times
Reputation: 20505
I certainly miss my community, which was mostly the night shift (and change of shift people) co-workers at a major psychiatric hospital. I knew so many people for so long, and under unusual circumstances of high stress, interpersonal connections, and often deep conversations, whether work-related or not. I certainly spent more time with those people over time than anyone else (living alone, no family or S.O.). They gave me such a great send-off, and of course the place is changing as it has to, and I still feel in connection with a lot of it, thanks to social media.

I would like to be able to have a shift a week or so of the same work where I am now, to be among "my kind" and of course for financial security. There is no work for me within some 80 miles (and I notice that I have stalled out on moving my RN license to my new state) but overall I don't miss being a working person. I feel like I am still recovering from the pressured life I led in eastern MA, despite working an off-shift and not being, well, ambitious.

As the saying goes, "The days are long, the years are short."
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Old 12-08-2018, 01:49 PM
Status: "Second Year School Teacher" (set 2 days ago)
 
Location: Shreveport, LA
1,309 posts, read 988,599 times
Reputation: 630
Quote:
Originally Posted by Aredhel View Post
THIS! OP, a life of leisure may seem appealing to you now, but I doubt you'd find an endless series of days spent doing nothing more than playing with your dogs, eating junk food, and sitting around the house very appealing at all. And if by some miracle you retired right now, that is all you would have.

You need to work on building a better, more meaningful, and more fulfilling life for yourself, both at work and outside of work. Waiting forty years to do this is a mistake. The people who fare best in retirement are those who already have a wide range of interests and activities that they can turn to to fill their time once work is no longer consuming the lion's share of their waking hours.

Earning money is important, but building a REAL life for yourself is far more important!
The job Iím doing now is the job I thought would be the most meaningful job to me. I got here after slaving away a few years at a job I hated far more than this one that paid far less (I did pharmacy tech work for 5 years) while I built a portfolio to make a career switch, and I thought academia would be my calling. While working pharmacy, I did other work on the side like running a food truck and being a nursing assistant. Now Iím in Academia and I am paid a little more than 2 and a half times what I made as a pharmacy tech and I hate this work much less, but Iím still discontent with it. Since I see nothing better workwise, I bought a poodle. I really love this poodle and love spending time with her. I got another little girl and we do stuff together. Iím seriously considering getting a boy poodle to breed these girls to so I can have more poodles. The thing is, is Iíve found that if you have to pay me to be somewhere, I probably wonít like it that much. The things Iíve enjoyed either donít involve money or they involve me spending a nominal amount of money.

I take part of this as just me being a little lazy, but its a pattern thatís held no matter what Iím doingómoney ruins anything good. Iím just glad my current academic position pays well enough and offers a good enough retirememt plan that Iíll be free from having to view things in terms of having to work for others one day. One day, Iíll have built the foundation for only doing things on my terms and not having to answer to anybody.

I already am like that to an extent having bought a house and a car, but Iím still not TRULY free. Iím just freer.

Iíve suffered with depression the past 15 years and nothingónot medicine, not therapy, not alternative treatmentsóhas ever made a difference. I suspect Iíll always be depressed, and Iím ready to give up fighting it and Iíll just try to live with it. Its a low-grade depression, but I canít get rid of it despite how mild it is.
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Old 12-08-2018, 03:01 PM
 
Location: Location: Happy Place
3,696 posts, read 1,872,421 times
Reputation: 11336
No, I do not miss working. I do not miss my pesky bosses, (one was nice, he is retiring this month), stupid tasks that meant nothing, getting up at 515am, having a 30 minute lunch...

I ADORE being retired. I waited until 62 so I could draw my federal pension and SS, so it worked out great. Plenty of money and I get to sleep late every day (dog willing)....
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Old 12-08-2018, 03:34 PM
 
Location: Phoenix, AZ
1,708 posts, read 755,612 times
Reputation: 4224
Quote:
Originally Posted by Magic Qwan View Post
I was curious how common it is to miss work once you retire?

These kinds of questions are ridiculous. If you ask enough people you'll get plenty who don't miss work (me) and plenty who do.
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Old 12-08-2018, 03:42 PM
 
1,657 posts, read 570,760 times
Reputation: 3122
Quote:
Originally Posted by Aredhel View Post
The people who fare best in retirement are those who already have a wide range of interests and activities that they can turn to to fill their time once work is no longer consuming the lion's share of their waking hours.

I don't agree with this as an across-the-board one-size-fits-all mantra. Few things annoy me more than those tv commercials that tout an "active retirement lifestyle" (usually for some community or some medication, LOL) as if it's some kind of abysmal failure if in retirement one doesn't have or doesn't WANT that kind of life.

If being a homebody and spending time with his dogs is what makes the OP happiest and most comfortable, then there is absolutely nothing wrong with that, for him. It may not be "textbook", it may not be in line with the current psychological theories of what constitutes the 'best' retirement lifestyle, but that's okay. I just don't subscribe to the notion that retirees have to "fill their time" with this, that or the other thing. Isn't the whole point of being retired that your time is now your own to do (or not do) with as you see fit?

Exactly as the OP says: "only doing things on my terms and not having to answer to anybody." I get where you're coming from because I'm the same way. I will admit that it took me several years after retirement to stop feeling as if I should be either guilty or apologetic for that, but I eventually got there 100%. Yes, it is a "me first" outlook...and why not? I've paid my dues to get to this point in my life, and so will you. If I have to set up an appointment for anything, I automatically say it has to be after 12 noon, and why? Because I don't want even the pressure of having to get up (and hence go to sleep at) a particular time. Me first. I have what most people would call a To Do list on my fridge, but in reality it's an If I Feel Like It Today list. Things get shifted to the next day(s) a lot, and for no other reason than that I simply didn't feel like it. So I'll do it tomorrow. Or not. Me first.

My daily life is divided into things that are Interests of the Moment and/or Whims, and things that are Chores. A chore is anything that isn't an interest of the moment or a whim. IOtheMs and Ws often change over time. Some things that I was gung-ho about five years ago haven't been touched since, although they may be one day again. If I feel like it. The key for me is that if I feel like I have to or should do something, odds are it falls into the Chore category. Even if it's minor. I admit to being lazy (often) and a huge procrastinator; neither is anything new, I've been that way all my life. What's new is that since retirement I no longer care that I am, LOL
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Old 12-08-2018, 03:54 PM
 
512 posts, read 305,409 times
Reputation: 2512

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Gyu82WG_edM

Quote:
Originally Posted by BBCjunkie View Post
I don't agree with this as an across-the-board one-size-fits-all mantra. Few things annoy me more than those tv commercials that tout an "active retirement lifestyle" (usually for some community or some medication, LOL) as if it's some kind of abysmal failure if in retirement one doesn't have or doesn't WANT that kind of life.

If being a homebody and spending time with his dogs is what makes the OP happiest and most comfortable, then there is absolutely nothing wrong with that, for him. It may not be "textbook", it may not be in line with the current psychological theories of what constitutes the 'best' retirement lifestyle, but that's okay. I just don't subscribe to the notion that retirees have to "fill their time" with this, that or the other thing. Isn't the whole point of being retired that your time is now your own to do (or not do) with as you see fit?

Exactly as the OP says: "only doing things on my terms and not having to answer to anybody." I get where you're coming from because I'm the same way. I will admit that it took me several years after retirement to stop feeling as if I should be either guilty or apologetic for that, but I eventually got there 100%. Yes, it is a "me first" outlook...and why not? I've paid my dues to get to this point in my life, and so will you. If I have to set up an appointment for anything, I automatically say it has to be after 12 noon, and why? Because I don't want even the pressure of having to get up (and hence go to sleep at) a particular time. Me first. I have what most people would call a To Do list on my fridge, but in reality it's an If I Feel Like It Today list. Things get shifted to the next day(s) a lot, and for no other reason than that I simply didn't feel like it. So I'll do it tomorrow. Or not. Me first.

My daily life is divided into things that are Interests of the Moment and/or Whims, and things that are Chores. A chore is anything that isn't an interest of the moment or a whim. IOtheMs and Ws often change over time. Some things that I was gung-ho about five years ago haven't been touched since, although they may be one day again. If I feel like it. The key for me is that if I feel like I have to or should do something, odds are it falls into the Chore category. Even if it's minor. I admit to being lazy (often) and a huge procrastinator; neither is anything new, I've been that way all my life. What's new is that since retirement I no longer care that I am, LOL
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Old 12-08-2018, 04:10 PM
Status: "Loving life, wife and job!" (set 11 days ago)
 
Location: USA
999 posts, read 387,453 times
Reputation: 2715
Quote:
Originally Posted by adjusterjack View Post
These kinds of questions are ridiculous. If you ask enough people you'll get plenty who don't miss work (me) and plenty who do.
So what? Iím sure many here enjoy the various comments pro and con.

I could have retired but a funny thing happened on the way to the forum, I began to really enjoy my work. Iím not if it was the working at home, the 12+ % raise I got, my bonus, my manager asking for six monthís notice, or, simply no longer giving a **** about the politics at work. I deliver, no one messes with me and my schedule belongs to me. Once Iím done, Iíll miss it to a certain extent but, they wonít miss me. I may be (even more) loathed by the time itís all said and done. As one manager told me, I just shudder when I get an email from you. Lol Iím not a bad guy....HR loves me. But, for the people I *touch*, it doesnít typically end well.

/evil grin/
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