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Old 12-11-2018, 05:59 AM
 
6,253 posts, read 4,731,924 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by happygrrrl View Post
If you have ever passed a kidney stone, you will understand the value of drinking water, and carrying it with you at all times.
If you have passed a kidney stone you need to have the stone tested, if available, and you need a lab workup. There are numerous types of kidney stones and different reasons that those stones form. Drinking water might help but you may also need dietary restrictions or other preventative measures.


I have never had a kidney stone but have heard the experience can be extremely painful. I would want a workup to help prevent future stones.
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Old 12-11-2018, 06:06 AM
 
6,253 posts, read 4,731,924 times
Reputation: 12844
Quote:
Originally Posted by NewbieHere View Post
And if you watch Lawrence of Arabia movie, the desert people drink less water than the English people. We are not all the same.
I do a lot of hiking in hot desert areas. Thirst is not always a good indicator of our level of hydration. In fact if we visit a desert area we immediately notice the dryness. That dryness causes a sensation of thirst even if we are totally hydrated and just drank a lot of water.


BTW, our bodies can adapt and tolerate large swings in "hydration" as measured by serum osmolality. What we call dehydration is often really the inability to cool our bodies by sweating. It is not the dehydration but overheating that is a serious concern. They can occur together but are not at all the same thing.
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Old 12-11-2018, 06:59 AM
 
Location: Williamsburg, VA
3,551 posts, read 1,655,156 times
Reputation: 10169
Quote:
Originally Posted by jrkliny View Post
If you have passed a kidney stone you need to have the stone tested, if available, and you need a lab workup. There are numerous types of kidney stones and different reasons that those stones form. Drinking water might help but you may also need dietary restrictions or other preventative measures.

All true statements (well, except for the word "might." I would change that to "will.")

The post you were responding to is also true. "If you have ever passed a kidney stone, you will understand the value of drinking water, and carrying it with you at all times." Yup! Totally agree with that one, too.

By the way, nobody is trying to infer the drinking water is ALL you need to do to prevent kidney stones, LOL. Just to be clear.



Quote:
Originally Posted by jrkliny View Post

I have never had a kidney stone but have heard the experience can be extremely painful. I would want a workup to help prevent future stones.

Yeah, that's pretty much a given. The odds of someone passing a kidney stone without seeing a doctor are extremely low. It would be sort of like saying if you just had a baby, you'd better go see a doctor.
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Old 12-11-2018, 09:05 AM
 
Location: SoCal
13,226 posts, read 6,331,374 times
Reputation: 9844
Quote:
Originally Posted by jrkliny View Post
I do a lot of hiking in hot desert areas. Thirst is not always a good indicator of our level of hydration. In fact if we visit a desert area we immediately notice the dryness. That dryness causes a sensation of thirst even if we are totally hydrated and just drank a lot of water.


BTW, our bodies can adapt and tolerate large swings in "hydration" as measured by serum osmolality. What we call dehydration is often really the inability to cool our bodies by sweating. It is not the dehydration but overheating that is a serious concern. They can occur together but are not at all the same thing.
Whatever you wrote maybe true, but I will still bring water, lots of it, if I ever go hiking in the desert. Nothing you say will sway me otherwise. Our bodies are different. I’m not going to be caught dead in the desert period.
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Old 12-11-2018, 09:23 AM
 
Location: Norfolk, VA
6,380 posts, read 6,003,363 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RosemaryT View Post
This thread took a long run around the barn!

There was not a complaint voiced in my original post. A subsequent poster really summed it up nicely when she said something like, WHY are we overloading our bodies with all this extra water? Why not just ingest water (or liquid) based on thirst?

That's a better way of expressing one of my original questions. Are we healthier for drinking all this water all the time? Seems like studies show that American's longevity is going down, not up.

And someone else said, "It almost seems like these people who are constantly sipping on their water have an oral fixation!" and I thought that raised an excellent point, too. I see folks who seem almost tethered to their bottle of Evian (which is naive spelled backwards!)

For a long time, humans have ingested water based on bodily needs. When did that go all wonky? And please note, I am not complaining - just observing!
Well that is a preference. I see no issue in having the water on your person, just in case you need or want it.
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Old 12-11-2018, 09:35 AM
 
3,245 posts, read 5,278,524 times
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Thirty years ago many people still didn't wear seat belts, way more people smoked tobacco, consumed saturated fats and didn't prioritize keeping active.

We're a species, we evolve. Proper hydration has been proven to have abundant health benefits, is fairly easy to incorporate into our lives and hurts no one. I'm much happier that I see way more people holding bottles of water rather than lit cigarettes.
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Old 12-11-2018, 09:41 AM
 
Location: Norfolk, VA
6,380 posts, read 6,003,363 times
Reputation: 3557
Quote:
Originally Posted by NYC2RDU View Post
Thirty years ago many people still didn't wear seat belts, way more people smoked tobacco, consumed saturated fats and didn't prioritize keeping active.

We're a species, we evolve. Proper hydration has been proven to have abundant health benefits, is fairly easy to incorporate into our lives and hurts no one. I'm much happier that I see way more people holding bottles of water rather than lit cigarettes.
facts
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Old 12-11-2018, 09:53 AM
 
6,584 posts, read 2,373,498 times
Reputation: 15132
Quote:
Originally Posted by fluffythewondercat View Post
I've never understood why some people seem to lose their minds over a harmless activity other people do. It makes no sense to me.

Live and let live...

AMEN!


People have ALWAYS liked to have something to sip on, when they're out and about. Back when I was young and carefree, we would often stop at McDs and sip on a soda all night, while riding around town, with nothing productive to do. LOL (Always diet soda for me.)


I'm currently sitting at my desk drinking my 2nd cup of coffee. After lunch, I'll probably shift over to a diet pepsi, or maybe a cup of peppermint tea.


We buy bottled spring water at home. I can taste a difference between the bottled water and water from the tap. I'm not adverse to drinking water from the tap, and I often do, if I just need a few gulps.


There IS the health benefit of drinking plenty of fluids. And water is a great fluid to be putting in your body. It is important to our health to be adequately hydrated. As a matter-of-fact, the most common cause of headaches is dehydration.
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Old 12-11-2018, 09:59 AM
 
6,584 posts, read 2,373,498 times
Reputation: 15132
Quote:
Originally Posted by RosemaryT View Post
This thread took a long run around the barn!

There was not a complaint voiced in my original post. A subsequent poster really summed it up nicely when she said something like, WHY are we overloading our bodies with all this extra water? Why not just ingest water (or liquid) based on thirst?

That's a better way of expressing one of my original questions. Are we healthier for drinking all this water all the time? Seems like studies show that American's longevity is going down, not up.

And someone else said, "It almost seems like these people who are constantly sipping on their water have an oral fixation!" and I thought that raised an excellent point, too. I see folks who seem almost tethered to their bottle of Evian (which is naive spelled backwards!)

For a long time, humans have ingested water based on bodily needs. When did that go all wonky? And please note, I am not complaining - just observing!

Maybe some of us DO have an oral fixation. I'm a smoker, so I'm sure someone could make that argument about me. And I HAVE been known to keep a bottle of water around when I'm cooking dinner. It helps keep me from snacking while I'm cooking.


And sometimes I flavor my bottled water, and sit down with it like it's dessert.


So...fine. It's an oral fixation. Don't care.
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Old 12-11-2018, 10:05 AM
 
Location: equator
3,436 posts, read 1,532,968 times
Reputation: 8538
Quote:
Originally Posted by jrkliny View Post
If you have passed a kidney stone you need to have the stone tested, if available, and you need a lab workup. There are numerous types of kidney stones and different reasons that those stones form. Drinking water might help but you may also need dietary restrictions or other preventative measures.


I have never had a kidney stone but have heard the experience can be extremely painful. I would want a workup to help prevent future stones.
Unfortunately, there's nothing conclusive about the origin and prevention of kidney stones. I've had 3. The doctors didn't even mention water though that is logical. Foods that MAY (but correlation to food has never been proven) contribute to stones are all healthy foods: all the leafy greens and any foods high in calcium. What are you gonna do? Calcium stones are 80% of all stones. Give up calcium? Nope.


Lots of water can only help. As long as you're not out and about looking for public restrooms, like in the other thread!
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