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Old 12-09-2018, 09:07 AM
 
11,969 posts, read 5,102,113 times
Reputation: 18703

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Quote:
Originally Posted by fluffythewondercat View Post
You don't think anyone is losing their mind?

In a few posts the focus of the thread changed from bottled water to we-don't-go-shopping to Starbucks coffee to (now) gasoline.

I realize oldsters like to get together on Sunday mornings and diss those ignorant youngsters who are just throwing money away but it would help if you had some actual facts on your side.

DASANI is a popular water brand. Says Coca-Cola, To create DASANI® water, we start with the local water supply, which is then filtered for purity using a state-of-the-art process called reverse osmosis. Afterwards, we add a special blend of minerals for that pure, crisp, fresh taste.

This idea that taking city water and filtering it means it's no better than tap water is hilarious, almost like you think Coca-Cola ought to be making bottled water the old-fashioned way, by combining hydrogen and oxygen atoms.
Defensive much? Take a deep breath and think of a cool ocean breeze.
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Old 12-09-2018, 09:09 AM
 
Location: Williamsburg, VA
3,551 posts, read 1,647,282 times
Reputation: 10162
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spuggy View Post
During the summer we made the mistake of leaving our water bottles in the car. By the time we got back we could have tossed a teabag in the bottle and made a cup of tea the water was so hot My oncologist is constantly stressing the need to keep hydrated and especially in the summer. I’ve heard kidney stones are brutally painful so I can understand the importance of drinking plenty of water.

I have had two bouts of dehydration in my life, one being borderline dangerous. It’s not something to take lightly.

We have a little insulated cooler that we got as a giveaway at a trade show. It's a tiny little thing, basically just holds the water bottle and maybe a little snack if we're going to some sort of outdoor event. Works great, even on the hottest days. It has a long strap so you can easily carry it like a purse if you need to take it with you (and if you do, you can put your wallet in it, LOL,). Around here you see them being given away quite a bit, but I think you could also find one at a sporting goods store.
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Old 12-09-2018, 09:11 AM
 
Location: Cochise county, AZ
4,960 posts, read 3,451,255 times
Reputation: 10475
Since moving to Arizona, I have been drinking a lot more water, both filtered at home and bottled. The water here,unfiltered, tastes horrible. Even filtered I add lemon slices, which I freeze in lieu of ice cubes. There are warnings about remaining hydrated here in the desert.

It's just become a way of life. I remember growing up in Minnesota and there were some areas where the water was actually delicious. Upon moving to the city I started filtering the water because the taste was off. Then, at work, it just became easier to have bottled water.
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Old 12-09-2018, 09:11 AM
 
252 posts, read 131,630 times
Reputation: 645
I joke about the water bottle thing all the time.
I remember bicycle excursions as a kid growing up in south Florida. We'd duck into someone backyard and drink out of the hose. Tasted like rubber but we didn't care. At little league football they would only allow 5 sips of water at a prescribed time during practice so we didn't cramp up. It prolly wasn't a good idea.
I get kidney stones as well but never did seem to help by constantly hydrating.
Remember salt pills?
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Old 12-09-2018, 09:12 AM
 
3,604 posts, read 1,639,332 times
Reputation: 13548
Quote:
Originally Posted by Piney Creek View Post
We have a little insulated cooler that we got as a giveaway at a trade show. It's a tiny little thing, basically just holds the water bottle and maybe a little snack if we're going to some sort of outdoor event. Works great, even on the hottest days. Around here you see them being given away quite a bit, but I think you could also find one at a sporting goods store.
We decided to invest in one after that incident .
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Old 12-09-2018, 09:14 AM
 
3,604 posts, read 1,639,332 times
Reputation: 13548
Quote:
Originally Posted by marino760 View Post
Defensive much? Take a deep breath and think of a cool ocean breeze.
Oh give up the gaslighting, fluffy just made an observation of some people overacting to the dreadful sight of people carrying water bottles
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Old 12-09-2018, 09:22 AM
 
Location: Williamsburg, VA
3,551 posts, read 1,647,282 times
Reputation: 10162
Quote:
Originally Posted by RosemaryT View Post
These days, it seems like most younger folks are toting around water bottles and drinking water *all* the time. Is it really improving our health? I have my doubts.

In the early 1990s, I had a family member who carried a bottle of water everywhere and was always sipping on that water. He was also in the bathroom every 30 minutes (for obvious reasons). We thought it was pretty weird that this healthy 30-something guy was constantly drinking water.

Now it seems like the norm.

When did Americans decide that we must have bottled water with us at all times? Is it really improving our health and/or our longevity? It seems like a very curious habit to me (but then again, I'm old).

Getting back to the OP's question, the one thing that surprised me in your post was that you think it's a young person's trend. Maybe it's different in other cities, but FWIW around here it's more something I see the seniors doing. I just came back from the rec center, and since this was the topic du jour I was checking it out. If anything, it was mostly the seniors I saw with water. And, as I think about it, I think I've noticed more talking about staying hydrated after I moved here; not so much back when I was living in a much younger community.

I think it's the retirees who have become aware of the health benefits of staying hydrated. Around here, it's one of those things that is encouraged as a permanent lifestyle change, especially as you age. And yes, to answer the OP's question, for many people there are definite health advantages to staying hydrated throughout the day.

Last edited by Piney Creek; 12-09-2018 at 09:30 AM..
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Old 12-09-2018, 09:27 AM
 
Location: Central New Jersey
2,384 posts, read 907,342 times
Reputation: 4219
I've done it since my youth, definitely over 30 years now. Carried a bottle of it wherever I was allowed and continue to do so. Gotta stay hydrated and keeping flushing your system. Though back then we all used tap water, I still do occasionally, but the local supermarket water tastes the same as that overpriced filtered sewer water IMO.
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Old 12-09-2018, 09:42 AM
 
Location: Florida Baby!
5,179 posts, read 668,775 times
Reputation: 3122
Here's a little history of bottled water--it's "older" than you might think....

https://www.thekitchn.com/a-brief-hi...d-water-228642

This whole "controversy" is akin to my gripe about bringing a "whole refrigerator and living room set" to the beach. When I was married my ex would pack snacks and drinks, an umbrella*, chairs, blankets, towels, sunblock* and other accoutrements for a day at the beach. For me all this took the fun out of going. I would just shake my head at him and say, "Do you know what WE took to the beach when I was a kid? A towel."

*these were not so necessary in the 1950-60s as they are now (same with bottled water)

Moving from CT to FL, I find that I'm thirstier in FL and try to remember to carry water in the car with me, otherwise it's a trip to a McDonald's drive through to re-hydrate.

I think purchased bottled water is a regional thing. If the local tap water tastes good a refillable bottle will do. The mineral content of some water systems make tap water intolerable to drink even though the it's deemed "safe." The absolute worst tap water I ever tasted was at my friend's house in Santa Barbara.

And I agree with the observation that there are not as many public water bubblers as there used to be (and many of the ones left are disgusting) I was happy to see that the library I worked at before I retired installed a bottle refiller fountain--we'll probably be seeing more of these installed in public places as time goes by.

In the end, it's whatever floats your boat (or kidneys...)
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Old 12-09-2018, 09:56 AM
 
Location: Orlando
1,983 posts, read 2,631,742 times
Reputation: 7538
Thanks, y'all, for the reminder to go get a drink of water!
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