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Old 12-13-2018, 08:19 AM
 
4,343 posts, read 6,053,473 times
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I've gone from an acre of raised tree beds to an assortment of clay pots. It's amazing what you can grow in a container or in hanging baskets. I got tired of dragging a garden hose from tree bed to tree bed.
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Old 12-13-2018, 09:48 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rodentraiser View Post
I ordered a couple of plants off of eBay and was surprised to find that they thrived when I planted them. One was a mock orange plant and the other was something called blue mist. That should have gone into partial shade, but I planted it in full sun and it had some gorgeous blooms on it.
Hmmm, now you have me curious. I know there's a Caryopteris 'Blue Mist' but caryopteris are happiest in full sun so I doubt it was cited as preferring part shde. I had one four gardens ago but the only full-sun place for it was near the front door steps which didn't work out because of the bees; caryopteris is a bee magnet when in bloom with those blue flowers.

Or you could have Fothergilla 'Blue Mist' which has white bottle-brush-shaped flowers in spring. The cultivar name refers to the foliage. It can take full sun just fine in most places (maybe not the deep south but otherwise it's tolerant of part shade to full sun.) If this is what you have, the full sun probably encouraged some especially nice fall color.
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Old 12-13-2018, 10:48 AM
 
Location: Virginia
3,956 posts, read 2,028,343 times
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Originally Posted by NewbieHere View Post
You can get cheap seeds from Home Depot, about 50c per packet. You can harvest your seeds and reused them the following years. I compost my vegs and all kinds of seeds from previous year pop up voluntarily.
Also, if there's any Master Gardener group in your area, there will be an annual Seed Swap taking place at the end of January 2019. They take place all over the country on the same day. Ours is slated for January 26th, so I guess that is the date for the others as well. Master gardeners bring in seeds that they have saved, bagged, and labeled. Members of the public can attend the event and pick up seeds and exchange any seeds they have as well. There are also free lectures on gardening and door prizes too. It's really a nice event to have in the middle of winter for gardeners.
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Old 12-13-2018, 12:33 PM
 
Location: Backwoods of Maine
7,110 posts, read 8,147,355 times
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Living in zone 4b, I have 2 greenhouses (one is actually a hoop house) and between them, I am able to grow most of the long season crops and even a lemon tree. I use raised beds and something called a garden scooter, which is very he!pful on a daily basis. I rigged up a tool handle for it, so all my garden tools are always at hand.

I have 2 knee replacements, so I'm more comfortable on my feet walking, than crouching down. With poultry and other livestock that require daily chores, I can tend them standing up. One or more of our 3 dogs is always with me, so if I have to wrestle a muddy pig, I can get some help. Haven't yet lost a wrestling match with a pig, though!
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Old 12-13-2018, 01:32 PM
 
Location: SoCal
13,191 posts, read 6,308,074 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nor'Eastah View Post
Living in zone 4b, I have 2 greenhouses (one is actually a hoop house) and between them, I am able to grow most of the long season crops and even a lemon tree. I use raised beds and something called a garden scooter, which is very he!pful on a daily basis. I rigged up a tool handle for it, so all my garden tools are always at hand.

I have 2 knee replacements, so I'm more comfortable on my feet walking, than crouching down. With poultry and other livestock that require daily chores, I can tend them standing up. One or more of our 3 dogs is always with me, so if I have to wrestle a muddy pig, I can get some help. Haven't yet lost a wrestling match with a pig, though!
I have a book from a guy in Maine, he wrote something related to 4 seasons gardening, this after he visited France, which he got the inspiration.
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Old 12-15-2018, 03:27 PM
 
Location: Washington state
5,431 posts, read 2,758,123 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Clemencia53 View Post
you can do it!

One of our older church members has MS. She uses a cane and drags one foot. Moves very slowly. She does drive though.

She had to move to a housing apartment but they allow you to grow flowers etc. She has transformed her small yard into a small paradise. She is out there slowly weeding and planting. Looks very nice.
Thank you! I need the encouragement.

Quote:
Originally Posted by BBCjunkie View Post
Hmmm, now you have me curious. I know there's a Caryopteris 'Blue Mist' but caryopteris are happiest in full sun so I doubt it was cited as preferring part shde. I had one four gardens ago but the only full-sun place for it was near the front door steps which didn't work out because of the bees; caryopteris is a bee magnet when in bloom with those blue flowers.

Or you could have Fothergilla 'Blue Mist' which has white bottle-brush-shaped flowers in spring. The cultivar name refers to the foliage. It can take full sun just fine in most places (maybe not the deep south but otherwise it's tolerant of part shade to full sun.) If this is what you have, the full sun probably encouraged some especially nice fall color.
I don't remember much about it except that it didn't bloom until about September and the flowers looked like blue rhododendrons. I remember thinking that that's why I should have planted it in shade. It really was gorgeous and I left it when I sold the house. Naturally, the new owners pulled it out.
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Old 12-18-2018, 09:32 AM
 
Location: Backwoods of Maine
7,110 posts, read 8,147,355 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NewbieHere View Post
I have a book from a guy in Maine, he wrote something related to 4 seasons gardening, this after he visited France, which he got the inspiration.
Yes, that guy is Eliot Coleman, who lives down on the coast next to Helen and Scott Nearing's old property. In fact, he bought his land from Helen and Scott. He is retired now.

Our land is quite a bit north of his, so we have more challenges to deal with. But it's all possible with good timing and good management.
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Old 12-18-2018, 04:51 PM
 
Location: VT; previously MD & NJ
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Quote:
The only that is hard is lugging the bags of soil. Its a bit much for me.
Keep your eye out for a children's wagon at yard sales and flea markets. Can use it to bring in groceries from the car too.
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Old 12-18-2018, 05:16 PM
 
Location: VT; previously MD & NJ
2,185 posts, read 1,340,059 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jrkliny View Post
This sort of topic typically will only attract those who are interested in the activity. I thought I would post a balancing point of view. I really dislike gardening and all sorts of yard work.

Well, you don't have to like what I like. That's fine.


Vegetable gardening is a very expensive, time consuming endeavor. Years ago I thought I could save some money growing vegetables. Anyone who has tried it knows better. Now I do like the taste of fresh picked vs the stuff that was picked days and days before and shipped from California. No problem. The local farmers market provides a great alternative. The food is fresh, low cost, and I get what I want, when I want it. In my neighborhood, I have not seen anyone attempting any sort of serious vegetable gardening.

backyard vegetable gardening is not expensive, even if you buy the plants rather than starting everything from seed. Actually, if you use seed, you may end up with many more plants than you want to care for. And lots of stuff to give away. My money seems to go on perennial flowering plants... that may or may not make it through the winter here in VT.


There are those who want the manicured lawns, shrubbery and flower gardens. In fact about half of the yards are well manicured. Few homeowners do it themselves but there are endless numbers of "landscapers" coming and going on a daily basis. Spring cleanups, mowing, and the big Fall cleanups can cost well into the thousands of dollars. I fall into the other group with "rustic" style yards. We have lots of trees so little concern about trying to grow grass in the shade. Instead we have a lot of ground covers. We do have some areas of grass but fortunately we also have the variety of those beautiful yellow flowers that break up the monoculture. When it finally comes time for dealing with the Fall leaves and debris, I have a powerful leaf blower and I blow the leaves to the back of the yard for natural composting.

I would argue that hiring landscapers to keep a manicured lawn and flower beds is not gardening. I would also argue that planting groundcovers and other self-sustaining, low maintenance plants is not gardening either... it's a one and done with a little cleanup in the fall.



Instead of gardening, I do other activities instead, including lots of travel.
Travel is a lot more expensive than vegetable gardening.
Thanks for providing the alternate view.
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Old 12-18-2018, 08:33 PM
 
Location: We_tside PNW (Columbia Gorge) / CO / SA TX / Thailand
22,537 posts, read 39,914,033 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ansible90 View Post
Thanks for providing the alternate view.
avid gardener here (Who could not care LESS about lawns (ick)... what a WASTE! water / time / space / gas.. tho on farms you often of Acres of (lawn) grass between you and the road)

I really enjoyed our RTW trip (every election yr) and focus on Ag / gardening / botanical gardens / farm stays.

I travel to learn (gardening included), so will stay on farms (worldwide) in 2020. Making arrangements now.

Garden and travel... on yrs I travel, my garden gets to rest. (Jubilee yr every 4!)

I pick up produce / fruit from gleaning events.

I have a REALLY big pantry and Chest freezer (s) .

Do lots of food drying (for travel enjoyment, + we give dried (homegrown) fruits to our hosts)

Edible landscape is handy! and very productive. (in our climate)

The deer sure think so!
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