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Old 12-12-2018, 05:15 PM
 
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An analytical look at retirement communities:


The Long Last Act: The Future of Aging
By Kim Tingley

All brands cultivate their image, but building communities for seniors typically requires a special degree of staging. “Architects are basically set designers,” David Dillard, the president of D2 Architecture, a senior-housing firm, told me. “We fight to diminish any icons of this being a senior place. We literally hide things. Inside the community — this is part of our struggle — you don’t want to see your future.”

https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/...ritaville.html
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Old 12-12-2018, 05:32 PM
 
Location: Sierra Nevada Land, CA
8,392 posts, read 9,136,940 times
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If some people chose to live in a newly developed retirement community why not! Others, like us chose to live in a real town that has been around since the 19th century. We live in an area that is a retirement destination. To each their own.
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Old 12-12-2018, 05:49 PM
 
Location: Omaha, Nebraska
7,310 posts, read 4,151,370 times
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Thanks, that was an interesting article. It seems to me that, faced with an unprecedented demographic change, it's going to take creative experimentation to figure out the approaches that will work best to make the "golden years" as happy as possible. But "You don't want to see your future" is something that will have to change if our society is going to handle aging more gracefully.
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Old 12-12-2018, 05:58 PM
 
378 posts, read 226,641 times
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Be careful are about these senior communities. I found that cliques to be the norm. Gossip and petty competitions are commonplace. Drinking alcohol, political/HOA discussions, and talk about people's sick care issues are the norm. People seem to make friends who came from the same state or same country. A lot of bragging about stuff they buy or cruise ship travels they went on. I found that it was like high school, but worse.
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Old 12-12-2018, 07:06 PM
 
Location: Arizona
5,940 posts, read 5,297,242 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by slowdude222 View Post
Be careful are about these senior communities. I found that cliques to be the norm. Gossip and petty competitions are commonplace. Drinking alcohol, political/HOA discussions, and talk about people's sick care issues are the norm. People seem to make friends who came from the same state or same country. A lot of bragging about stuff they buy or cruise ship travels they went on. I found that it was like high school, but worse.
How terrible! People drinking alcohol!

Nothing you say is true in any of the 55+ communities that I am familiar with. Except the alcohol. We do drink and we like it!
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Old 12-12-2018, 07:31 PM
 
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The article cited by the OP states the below:

"Fewer than 14 percent of Americans 75 and older occupy some form of senior housing today. Three-quarters of those over 50 say they would prefer not to move at all. And untold numbers of seniors who might need or want to enter an age-restricted or assisted-living community won’t be able to afford to do so; 30 percent of those 65 and older have an annual income below $23,000....."

The Future of Aging Just Might Be in Margaritaville
https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/...ritaville.html

Since fewer than 14 percent of seniors live in senior housing according to the article, I'm always surprised when people suggest moving to 55+ communities or senior dwellings or to a 'retirement home' (a surprisingly large number of people who are not seniors use the term 'retirement home') to solve isolation, socialization, difficulty finding friends, and to help in finding satisfactory activities,,....when most 55+ communities are out of financial feasibility for at least many, if not most seniors - and just a fraction live in low-income senior apartments which are vastly different than higher-end 55+ senior communities where homes/townhouses are purchased.
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Old 12-13-2018, 09:43 AM
 
479 posts, read 399,299 times
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This will be an issue wherever people congregate. There are always people who want to be told what to do and to think; people whose mission in life is to tell them; and others, who might want human company, but don't want to be dictated to. This third group of people are irritated by, and become irritating, to the kingpins and queen bees, and often get pushed to the side socially. That's what you saw in high school.

Easier to avoid it in the workplace, because everyone has a job and a home/family to go to, but it was still there. Once you're surrounded by other retired people, the same old human patterns become more obvious. I doubt there is any way to avoid it. It's a price that must be paid, to avoid becoming dangerously isolated with age.

Quote:
Originally Posted by slowdude222 View Post
Be careful are about these senior communities. I found that cliques to be the norm. Gossip and petty competitions are commonplace. .... I found that it was like high school, but worse.
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Old 12-13-2018, 11:33 AM
 
Location: equator
3,431 posts, read 1,527,565 times
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Interesting article---thanks! I was waiting to see a pic of Jimmy Buffett though. Now I'll have to Google it myself, SIGH.

I agree with others: it's always high school for the rest of your life, LOL. Difference is, we can avoid who we don't like, for the most part, and concentrate on those we mesh with. Age doesn't seem to change that.
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Old 12-13-2018, 11:59 AM
 
630 posts, read 402,804 times
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I was not able to read the article, as I have already reached my limit of free articles. I have sometimes wistfully considered a mature adult community, but I need to take care of my disabled son, and I love living in the mountains with my goats and chickens and am in the process of building a diferent type of community.

But sometimes I look at the ammenities and think these communities sound wonderful. But, after reading some of the comments about cliques, and it being like high school, that sounds like a nightmare. I like to think that as humans mature they become more focused on character and less on pretentiousness and how much 'stuff'[ or money] they have accumulated.

I was never one of the "popular kids." I was not one of the "average popularity kids." I was not even welcomed into the group of kids who banded together because no one else would accept them. I would never even consider re-entering that type of skewed priority culture, and it makes me so sad to know that so many people have not "grown up" waaaaaay beyond that. At least I am no longer going to daydream about how much easier it would be in such a community, because, for me, I realize now, it wouldn't be.
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Old 12-15-2018, 08:33 AM
 
795 posts, read 211,208 times
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My father lives in a "high-end" retirement community. The business model is about creating a visually stimulating environment, pristine landscaping, upgrading carpeting, lobby furniture, etc. to attract high-end clients on an on-going basis since there is high turnover due residents moving to skilled care facilities and dying. These high renovation costs are passed onto current residents through rent increases. He has had to absorb these increases as his use of the facilities declines and affordability decreases. However, he doesn't want to move so he pays a steep price for companionship.
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