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Old 12-13-2018, 08:38 AM
 
Location: Charleston, SC
1,362 posts, read 764,777 times
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Just thinking out loud here.....

I'm really in the Asset Protection Phase now in Retirement, and looking at the Stock portion of my Allocation. For broad-based Market Exposure, it's either the SPY ETF or Fidelity's FZROX Total Mutual Fund.

The Mutual Fund is down to Zero Expense Ratio -- it's free of even a 0.01% fee.

The ETF is a Commission-free trade at Fido. I think the only benefit is the fact that you can buy/sell ETF's during the trading day, where the Mutual Fund is settled at the close. A minor thing, to be sure. I have Cash on the sideline and may increase the Stock exposure of my allocation soon.


Anybody have thoughts on the subject on the Subject ??
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Old 12-13-2018, 08:44 AM
 
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the fidelity fund follows it's own index . you really have to see if the allocation is what you want . they may use non typical allocations between all the market segments .
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Old 12-13-2018, 08:52 AM
 
Location: Charleston, SC
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They call their FZROX a "Total Market" Index, not exactly sure what the weighting would be.
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Old 12-13-2018, 08:59 AM
 
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rather then pay to license the standardized index's used . fidelity came up with their own indexes which are not directly comparable

Last edited by mathjak107; 12-13-2018 at 09:59 AM..
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Old 12-13-2018, 09:19 AM
 
Location: Ypsilanti, MI
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I know I am an outlier with this opinion, but why buy an Index Fund which is so broad that it includes guaranteed losers? The S&P 500 currently includes companies which have seen a 40% decrease in their stock prices this year.


I prefer other Mutual funds where the Managers are attempting to outperform rather than match the market, and where data is available which indicates their past success at achieving this feat.
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Old 12-13-2018, 09:35 AM
 
Location: Florida
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A benefit of the ETF is they trade like stocks which let you set the price you want to buy or sell at. In a mutual fund you have to buy and sell on the day you place the order and at the closing price.
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Old 12-13-2018, 09:59 AM
 
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lately getting that ending price after the late day sell off has been a good thing ha ha ha
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Old 12-13-2018, 10:03 AM
 
Location: Charleston, SC
1,362 posts, read 764,777 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MI-Roger View Post
I know I am an outlier with this opinion, but why buy an Index Fund which is so broad that it includes guaranteed losers? The S&P 500 currently includes companies which have seen a 40% decrease in their stock prices this year.


I prefer other Mutual funds where the Managers are attempting to outperform rather than match the market, and where data is available which indicates their past success at achieving this feat.


Understood. I have some segment of my Allocation for Individual Stocks and Managed Funds, but I'm really in the Asset Protection Phase now. If we ever get back to a generally up-moving Market again, I would increase broad exposure.
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Old 12-13-2018, 01:10 PM
 
Location: Denver, CO
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Fidelity and Vanguard both have some good growth funds that you should look at even at a slight fee. I really don't mind paying for that active management when I'm getting at least at least 3% above index performance year after year. If you have low returns you are not really protecting your assets.
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Old 12-13-2018, 01:20 PM
 
71,463 posts, read 71,652,652 times
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i agree , i have index funds but my fidelity contra , fidelity blue chip growth and fidelity growth co beat them time and time again . i will gladly pay those fees .
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