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Old 12-17-2018, 12:10 PM
 
245 posts, read 79,129 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nanny Goat View Post
I think for many people it's their co-workers that are the most difficult part. Not necessarily the job.
Coworkers and supervisors are often difficult. There are plenty of supervisors who may be decent at their jobs but have no business managing people. If you can't behave like a decent person and support the people who work under you, then you shouldn't be managing. It's too bad that companies often put up with bad managers who destroy morale simply because they are good at what they do. They also need to bring out the best in their staff, which is a big part of their jobs, and many fail at that big time.
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Old 12-17-2018, 12:18 PM
 
Location: Nescopeck, Penna. (birthplace)
12,351 posts, read 7,513,144 times
Reputation: 15950
I learned fairly early-on that most of the micromanagement and office-politicking that makes for a stressful job originates in prime business hours -- mid-morning to late-afternoon Monday-through-Friday. Accordingly, I quickly gravitated to the other shifts, which were usually less-popular anyway.

I quickly learned how to identify and relate to those individuals on other schedules to whom my work was important; found "project"-type duties to which I could devote attention when activity was slow. And although I preferred a late-afternoon start more than an overnight, often took the latter because it afforded an opportunity to work with the "go-getters", who tended to rise and show up early.

And some of the jobs involved answering an outside (800#) phone line; the problems which arose covered a wide variety of issues ,often of spontaneous origin, and I learned to familiarize myself with the available resources; also, that I could usually determine within a fairly short time whether I'd made the right decision.

The biggest downside to this strategy was that prospects for promotion and advancement usually led to the 9-t0-5 swamp (hence, the push for "extra credit" work to filly the slack time and demonstrate ambition; bBut it sure beat the tedium of a back-row desk in a "corporate anthill/henhouse".

Last edited by 2nd trick op; 12-17-2018 at 12:27 PM..
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Old 12-17-2018, 12:20 PM
 
Location: Lakewood OH
21,697 posts, read 23,672,920 times
Reputation: 35449
Quote:
Originally Posted by Blue Wave View Post
Coworkers and supervisors are often difficult. There are plenty of supervisors who may be decent at their jobs but have no business managing people. If you can't behave like a decent person and support the people who work under you, then you shouldn't be managing. It's too bad that companies often put up with bad managers who destroy morale simply because they are good at what they do. They also need to bring out the best in their staff, which is a big part of their jobs, and many fail at that big time.
Good point. Some supervisors get their jobs because itís simply the next step up but are really not qualified to be in charge of people. I have had great ones and terrible ones. Mostly mediocre ones.

Itís usually management though that gives workers the most headaches. A good deal of the time they donít know anything about the departments they are in charge of and donít really care about how they work. That doesnít stop them from implementing orders though.
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Old 12-17-2018, 12:25 PM
 
10,355 posts, read 9,385,677 times
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It wasn't the actual job function that was difficult, the problems came from the managers and corporate clowns who made it stressful, and in many cases, a very emotionally toxic work environment.

The closer retirement loomed, I would say to myself as I walked in the door: "One more day closer to retirement!."
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Old 12-17-2018, 02:00 PM
 
Location: Location: Happy Place
3,696 posts, read 1,872,421 times
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I made it to 30+ years of federal service by sheer determination. About 10 years were fun and I loved my work, the rest were pretty boring and unimportant.

I knew there was a decent structured pension and 401k proceeds waiting for me once I hit 62. Very happy I stuck it out, put up with insane bosses, stupid tasks, crushingly boring training. Happy with my pension and feel blessed to have it.
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Old 12-17-2018, 02:34 PM
 
20,143 posts, read 11,172,468 times
Reputation: 20161
Quote:
Originally Posted by Clemencia53 View Post
I loved my military life!

Maybe you need something more exciting.
So did I.

Alas, the military is for the young, so my career could not last as long as I needed to work for a living.
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Old 12-17-2018, 02:36 PM
 
20,143 posts, read 11,172,468 times
Reputation: 20161
Quote:
Originally Posted by AlwaysBeachin View Post
I've come to realize that I've hated just about every single job I've had, and I'm not yet 40. Some of you on here mentioned that you hated your whole work life and couldn't wait until retirement from the beginning of your time in the workforce. How did you get through all those years?

I'm not naive enough to think work should be fun or exciting all the time. We work for an income to pay bills and take care of life's expenses. Some are lucky to be able to follow their passion and it produce an income for them. Most of us just have to accept something tolerable and live with it.

After awhile, it seems that all jobs become mentally (or physically) draining. Changing jobs often helps temporarily; but these days, even if you find something great, it never lasts. There are so many company buyouts, mergers, layoffs, management changes, etc. It can be frustrating to jump around and finally get something that's manageable, get settled; then, due to one of the aforementioned things, it comes to an end. You're left to start over, often taking another job you don't really want.

I know the key is to focus on the good aspects of your life and your life outside of work. The problem is that we spend the majority of 5 out of 7 days of our waking lives at work. How did you push yourself through long enough for retirement? We really have no choice, but how did you make it bearable?

As I get older, the more I want to live below my means, have 0 debt except the mortgage, etc. Money buys options if it can't buy happiness. Options give you flexibility to continually change your situation to maintain happiness. Living for Friday afternoons gets old, and the deep Sunday night blues get old too.
The vast majority of people doing the 9-5 have never and will never be doing anything engaging or fun or exciting or interesting. There isn't that much engaging, fun, exciting, or interesting work to go around.
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Old 12-17-2018, 02:38 PM
 
Location: Central Ohio
613 posts, read 251,683 times
Reputation: 1165
Quote:
Originally Posted by Minervah View Post
Good point. Some supervisors get their jobs because itís simply the next step up but are really not qualified to be in charge of people. I have had great ones and terrible ones. Mostly mediocre ones.

Itís usually management though that gives workers the most headaches. A good deal of the time they donít know anything about the departments they are in charge of and donít really care about how they work. That doesnít stop them from implementing orders though.
I agree with this 100%. Managers and supervisors can make work a joy or a living hell. I was in the same position for many years supporting managers/supervisors. With a good manager, the job was a breeze, with a bad (evil) manager it was hell on earth. Over the years, I enjoyed most aspects of every job I held, and generally enjoyed my co-workers...in my mind, unless the job is truly horrendous, like cleaning up crime scenes or something, it's managers and upper level people who create the stress and misery.
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Old 12-17-2018, 02:51 PM
 
2,243 posts, read 1,106,098 times
Reputation: 9128
Alcohol was helpful at times.

Otherwise, looking forward to the weekend, to vacations, and focusing attention on family and friends can be helpful when you get fed up with your job.
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Old 12-17-2018, 03:01 PM
 
Location: New Mexico U.S.A.
25,331 posts, read 41,448,410 times
Reputation: 29410
Quote:
Originally Posted by AlwaysBeachin View Post
I've come to realize that I've hated just about every single job I've had, and I'm not yet 40. Some of you on here mentioned that you hated your whole work life and couldn't wait until retirement from the beginning of your time in the workforce. How did you get through all those years.
It was a matter of surviving. I liked some jobs more than others. I saw it as a necessity...

In the end, I did ok, and now retired...
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