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Old 12-17-2018, 09:45 PM
 
20,227 posts, read 11,210,470 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jrkliny View Post
I would disagree. I can find numerous occupations that I would find engaging and interesting. Some are exciting, few would be considered fun. It is all a matter of finding what interests you and preparing for it. With virtually zero unemployment that is easier than ever.
You are not the vast majority of people doing 9-5.

As I've already mentioned, I adored my military career, and adore working as a photographer now.

But I'm not the vast majority of people doing 9-5 either.

The top three job opportunities in the US are all in the retail industry: sales clerks, cashiers, and fast-food workers. There are two million people in the US alone working for Walmart. I suspect only a minority of them find it "engaging and interesting" or "exciting" or "fun."

The reason employment is low is that people are finally doing the jobs they never wanted to do, not because they are finding excitement or fun.
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Old 12-17-2018, 10:14 PM
 
6,319 posts, read 4,762,537 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ralph_Kirk View Post
.....

The top three job opportunities in the US are all in the retail industry: sales clerks, cashiers, and fast-food workers. ......
These jobs are the bottom of the employment ladder requiring almost no skills, knowledge or experience. Sometimes these are referred to as "entry level" but that implies the ability to advance to better jobs later. That is rarely possible for a sales clerk, cashier or fast food worker. Even HS grads usually have skills that prepare them for better jobs. About half the population goes on to get a degree or at least some college and are on the way to getting much better jobs.
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Old 12-18-2018, 12:13 AM
 
Location: Whereever we have our RV parked
8,835 posts, read 7,732,605 times
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The jobs I liked, I stayed with for a long time. A few jobs I hated and didnt stay long.
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Old 12-18-2018, 12:18 AM
 
605 posts, read 189,962 times
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I agree with MightyQueens post- I never expected my job to be great but just pay the bills

The concept of enjoying work has eluded me my entire life. I am now 50 years old! And will be working until I am 72 years old without choice. After that, we will have choices that mean i can reitire and live ok. Keep working a bit longer and retirement planning is what I want it to be
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Old 12-18-2018, 01:17 AM
 
Location: Tucson/Nogales
17,451 posts, read 21,283,365 times
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I did it by dangling lots of large, bright orange carrots in front of my eyes!

Every work day: Hang in there, in X amount of time you're on a plane to South America for 2 weeks!
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Old 12-18-2018, 04:24 AM
 
12,313 posts, read 15,224,755 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jrkliny View Post
There seem to be plenty of complaints about bad bosses. First step is to avoid accepting a job if you don't like the company culture or your specific boss. The number of bad bosses should be an encouragement. If those are the best that companies can hire for management positions, it should be easy to advance and become the boss.
A lot more easily said than done. My worst boss made a good impression during the interview and even the first month. I thought it was just me who didn't get along with him. Then I found out other previous employees didn't either.
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Old 12-18-2018, 05:33 AM
 
Location: We_tside PNW (Columbia Gorge) / CO / SA TX / Thailand
22,689 posts, read 40,050,764 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 2nd trick op View Post
I learned fairly early-on that most of the micromanagement and office-politicking that makes for a stressful job originates in prime business hours -- mid-morning to late-afternoon Monday-through-Friday. Accordingly, I quickly gravitated to the other shifts, which were usually less-popular anyway.
....
^^

The "work / J-O-B" was the EZ part...

Inept Managers and "cry-baby" ('day shifters') were the miserable part of employment.

Learned that at age 15 and it served me well for 40 yrs

Off-Shift =
More money (shift premium)
Free Lunch (less hours required away from home)
Unlimited Overtime
Nice co-workers... usually farmers / people trying to make ends meet (all were 'purposed'! and no BS! / office politics) (only axe murderers and alcoholics work nights (or SO my boss ranted every day...))

SO nice to get so much DONE!!! no phones, no bosses, no interruptions ... no BS. (boss changing your priorities every 10 minutes)

I did production management (in my night shift free time) and was always happy to see 'off-shifts' HIGHLY outperform the herd on dayshift (whiners).

Best job (for me) No bosses / no co-workers... appreciative clients.

Night shift weekend Trucking in WY, NE, SD, CO. But I came upon a LOT of fatal crashes (Era of "age 18 alcohol use"). (downside)

Ironically, in Aug I made a late night WY road trip to see meteor showers (identically on my old trucking route).
Witnessed a fatal accident < 10 minutes into my trip (as a reminder... it's still happening)...)
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Old 12-18-2018, 05:41 AM
 
6,319 posts, read 4,762,537 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pvande55 View Post
A lot more easily said than done. My worst boss made a good impression during the interview and even the first month. I thought it was just me who didn't get along with him. Then I found out other previous employees didn't either.
There is a message here. If you want to advance your career, you need to be able to handle an interview and make a good impression. That rarely comes naturally but like many other skills comes from practice. BTW, if you want to advance that most often means changing employers. Once you are cast in a particular level it is harder to advance. Plan on interviewing numerous times at different places so the process becomes as easy as possible. There are plenty of opportunities to also develop public speaking skills which are related to interview skills.
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Old 12-18-2018, 05:59 AM
 
Location: Scottsdale, AZ
7,751 posts, read 4,764,587 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jrkliny View Post
There is a message here.
Indeed there is.

It's "Don't listen to people who are talking out their [redacted]."
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Old 12-18-2018, 06:00 AM
 
20,227 posts, read 11,210,470 times
Reputation: 20238
Quote:
Originally Posted by jrkliny View Post
These jobs are the bottom of the employment ladder requiring almost no skills, knowledge or experience. Sometimes these are referred to as "entry level" but that implies the ability to advance to better jobs later. That is rarely possible for a sales clerk, cashier or fast food worker. Even HS grads usually have skills that prepare them for better jobs. About half the population goes on to get a degree or at least some college and are on the way to getting much better jobs.
My point is that most people in the US do not and will not have "rewarding" jobs.

These are the jobs most people in the US are doing:

1. Retail sales clerks
2. Cashiers
3. Office clerks
4. Fast workers
5. Registered Nurses
6. Food servers
7. Telephone customer service representatives
8. Janitors and cleaners
9. Freight, stock, and moving laborers
10 Secretaries and administrative assistants

https://www.ranker.com/list/most-com.../american-jobs

Most people are not going to have an inherently fun and exciting job. Ever.

It's going to be what they make of it.
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